S k a t e L o g     F o r u m
Inline Skating and Quad Roller Skating
Forum Hosts: Jessica Wright | Kathie Fry

FOLLOW US: Our Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Email    


Home - Forum Index - Africa Skating - Asia Skating - Europe Skating - Oceania Skating - Pan America Skating - Roller_Rinks - Friend the SkateLog Forum in Facebook - SkateLog Forum on Facebook

Forum Administrators: Jessica Wright and Kathie Fry | Email Us
Access code for buying and selling subforums: "skates"
How To Get a User Account and Posting Privileges in the SkateLog Forum
Use Google to Search the SkateLog Forum

Go Back   SkateLog Forum > General Interest Skating Forums > Main Skating Forum
FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Main Skating Forum General discussions about all types of skating, including how to skate, places to skate, skating events, skating equipment, and any topic that does not fall under one of our other skating forums.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old February 4th, 2009, 10:28 PM   #41
Poobah
Senior Member
 
Poobah's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 4,272
Default

Here's some feedback.

There's a skating rink I know of in another town that wants $300/hour to use their rink for roller derby practices. Apparently, someone isn't aware that their labor costs would really be limited to someone who can unlock the door, turn the heat/AC on and do the same stuff at the end of the practice. If they could get the costs down to something reasonable, they might have chances to get some big Saturday paydays that'd probably last until that league is ready to move on to an arena.

They COULD be capitalizing on a sport that is revitalizing interest in quads and skating in general. They COULD be making some scratch on skaters who need their overpriced wheels right now for Saturday's bout.

Instead, they focus on the birthday parties and worry that association with something cool and interesting will scare off parents. Interestingly, what they are REALLY missing out on is what the rise of kid's derby leagues could mean to their bottom line.

Has anyone read the Rinksider mag article on something like "What Roller Derby Can Mean to Your Bottom Line." Apparently the January issue that just shipped to RSA members (rink owner's assn) features an article called "Think Roller Derby."
__________________
*~[
Grand Poobah
Stats Geek
Poobah is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 5th, 2009, 02:06 AM   #42
Bill in Houston
Not Low Enough
 
Bill in Houston's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Houston, Texas, USA
Posts: 6,032
Default

Kids derby leagues? Really? I typed more, but deleted it...
Bill in Houston is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 5th, 2009, 03:33 AM   #43
BackofthePack
Someone has to be last
 
BackofthePack's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: SoCal USA
Posts: 554
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Poobah View Post
Here's some feedback.

There's a skating rink I know of in another town that wants $300/hour to use their rink for roller derby practices. Apparently, someone isn't aware that their labor costs would really be limited to someone who can unlock the door, turn the heat/AC on and do the same stuff at the end of the practice. If they could get the costs down to something reasonable, they might have chances to get some big Saturday paydays that'd probably last until that league is ready to move on to an arena
What would you consider something reasonable? And are we talking dead rink time or a time slot where they would be open for something else?

Rinks cost money to operate, ans as much as it might sound simple to you it's far more complex than just having someone there to unlock the doors. To heat a building that size is not cheap. Insurance is not cheap. City fees, taxes, utilities, etc., all have to be paid. If something breaks, someone has to be paid to fix it. $300 is pretty cheap to rent much of anything for several hours nowadays. You get 30 Derby skaters paying $10 bucks each and you just covered your 2 hour practice. That's about the price of a movie. Sounds reasonable to me. Especially if it's dead rink time. How much cheaper do you want it?

Now if you want to talk a prime time slots that's a whole different ball game. Skating may be on the ropes, but the last thing you want to do is give up a bread and butter session to take a chance on a derby practice. Those b-day parties you speak up can go for $150 a pop and some rinks are still running 3 or 4 of them on a Saturday pretty easily. That could mean an extra $600 on top of your session. And when they leave they will probably have chipped in for some additional pieces of candy, a glow stick or two, and a few rounds of video games. You got to sell a whole lot of Derby wheels to beat that. Even on a slow Saturday.
BackofthePack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 5th, 2009, 04:01 AM   #44
retread
Senior Member
 
retread's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 575
Default

Many reasons, all valid. Now, we as skaters need to support our rinks. Talk to your friends and neighbors, spread the word skating is still around. Right now I'm leaning on the Baltimore media to cover the nice organ session my rink has. I DON'T WANT TO LOSE MY RINK!!!

Bob
retread is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 5th, 2009, 11:14 AM   #45
Bill
Junior Member
 
Bill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Silicon Valley, CA
Posts: 2,573
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dj S Anthony View Post
Why do skating rinks close their doors for good? Is it because of insurance, lack of attendance, operating costs, ect..? Whats your input?

I've done searches of closed rinks and why they closed but I can't find too much info on the net. My local rink closed on 2004 and I'm doing research to attempt to open it back up again.
I was told by a unconfirmed source that insurance was a big issue back in the 90's not sure how that was fixed but it did cause a few to close. actuall most rinks have a pretty low over head but when you have a 40000sqft building with parking in prime comercial area
some big box chain or almost anyother comercial bussiness will be willing to pay a lot more for the space. my rink closed in 2000. it was located near several major car dealers. they were doing great back then when the property owner died his boys saw $$$$ and good bye rink and hello auto detail shop, another became walgreens, you get the idea movie theaters are smaller but can make more$$, back in the 70's when many rinks in the sanjose area were started land was a lot cheaper, and there was still land available. now it's worth 10-20x in value in the bay area comercial property in prime location, command a premium. the only rink that is doing great they own the property. but would also do great as a theater or walmart or costco. even if a rink is paid offif developed you could fit 20-30 condos in the space a rink occupies @ 500k here in san jose thats a huge payoff for the property owners. but not the same numbers in other parts of the country...,
Bill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 5th, 2009, 11:19 AM   #46
Bill
Junior Member
 
Bill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Silicon Valley, CA
Posts: 2,573
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dj S Anthony View Post
Why do skating rinks close their doors for good? Is it because of insurance, lack of attendance, operating costs, ect..? Whats your input?

I've done searches of closed rinks and why they closed but I can't find too much info on the net. My local rink closed on 2004 and I'm doing research to attempt to open it back up again.
I was told by a unconfirmed source that insurance was a big issue back in the 90's not sure how that was fixed but it did cause a few to close. actuall most rinks have a pretty low over head but when you have a 40000sqft building with parking in prime comercial area
some big box chain or almost anyother comercial bussiness will be willing to pay a lot more for the space. my rink closed in 2000. it was located near several major car dealers. they were doing great back then when the property owner died his boys saw $$$$ and good bye rink and hello auto detail shop, another became walgreens, you get the idea movie theaters are smaller but can make more$$, back in the 70's when many rinks in the sanjose area were started land was a lot cheaper, and there was still land available. now it's worth 10-20x in value in the bay area comercial property in prime location, command a premium. the only rink that is doing great they own the property. but would also do great as a theater or walmart or costco. even if a rink is paid offif developed you could fit 20-30 condos in the space a rink occupies @ 500k here in san jose thats a huge payoff for the property owners. but not the same numbers in other parts of the country...,
Bill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 5th, 2009, 07:21 PM   #47
Nathan_
Senior Member
 
Nathan_'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Appleton Wi, & Austin Tx.
Posts: 758
Default

Operating cost is huge, lots of overhead.

Insurance falls under the same category as 'theme parks', as for exact cost I can not remember what I was paying, but I do remember my over head being 14,000-16,000 a month depending on time of year.

I know 5 rink owners that have closed there doors in the past 3 years. 4 out of 5 closed due to other business opportunities being the property is worth more than the business. It becomes more logical to rent the business out for other uses or turn it into storage units.

I know one guy who just made the change to storage units, he had 200-350 of friday nights and the ONLY roller hockey program in a market of 800,000. He was doing strong, but as Ive heard him say "why work so hard when you can collect rent and still be just as wealthy".. 1st thing I learned in business, 'guaranteed money is the best type of money'
__________________
Check us out @ http://www.Derbysmack.com
Nathan_ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 5th, 2009, 07:28 PM   #48
Bill
Junior Member
 
Bill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Silicon Valley, CA
Posts: 2,573
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nathan_ View Post
Operating cost is huge, lots of overhead.

Insurance falls under the same category as 'theme parks', as for exact cost I can not remember what I was paying, but I do remember my over head being 14,000-16,000 a month depending on time of year.

I know 5 rink owners that have closed there doors in the past 3 years. 4 out of 5 closed due to other business opportunities being the property is worth more than the business. It becomes more logical to rent the business out for other uses or turn it into storage units.

I know one guy who just made the change to storage units, he had 200-350 of friday nights and the ONLY roller hockey program in a market of 800,000. He was doing strong, but as Ive heard him say "why work so hard when you can collect rent and still be just as wealthy".. 1st thing I learned in business, 'guaranteed money is the best type of money'
in San Jose rinks never close they just become condos...
to add injury to insult on a whim I googled my rinks address and it poped up on a cimercial realestate website.: *****(
Bill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 5th, 2009, 08:14 PM   #49
Bill
Junior Member
 
Bill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Silicon Valley, CA
Posts: 2,573
Default

mhttp://local.yahoo.com/slideshow.php?id=21575532&start= my old rink is a carwash now

Bill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 6th, 2009, 02:04 AM   #50
BackofthePack
Someone has to be last
 
BackofthePack's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: SoCal USA
Posts: 554
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill View Post
in San Jose rinks never close they just become condos...
to add injury to insult on a whim I googled my rinks address and it poped up on a cimercial realestate website.: *****(
Bill that may or may not be for the reason you are thinking.

Many real-estate agencies will place addresses online even though they don't actually have the listing. They are merely fishing for offers which they will then take to the business owner in the hopes that they can lure them into selling with the right number. The tip-off is usually a picture of just the outside of the building with very basic info gleamed from tax records or such.

Same thing in the boat business. Boat brokers go thru marina's taking snapshots of boats at random and then toss them up on a website. Owners may not even know their boat is online.
BackofthePack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 6th, 2009, 02:50 AM   #51
Bill
Junior Member
 
Bill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Silicon Valley, CA
Posts: 2,573
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BackofthePack View Post
Bill that may or may not be for the reason you are thinking.

Many real-estate agencies will place addresses online even though they don't actually have the listing. They are merely fishing for offers which they will then take to the business owner in the hopes that they can lure them into selling with the right number. The tip-off is usually a picture of just the outside of the building with very basic info gleamed from tax records or such.

Same thing in the boat business. Boat brokers go thru marina's taking snapshots of boats at random and then toss them up on a website. Owners may not even know their boat is online.
Thanks for the positive spin. it is 2 acres of prime realestate.I was toldin the past the building has archetevture intrest the massive headder beam for the 200 ft long floor was trucked from Oregon they had to shut down I5 to get it here. it was such a special piece of wood that in the title there is a clause that they can't rebuild the building. so that is probably why it is still a rink. there is a medical offices next door and they would like the property for parking.

visited another old rink that closed in the 80's.. gossip is the owner had substance issues and owed money to the wrong people so had to skip town. the building is now an Indian grocery store. and still has a huge open floor
space. the ice rink next to it became a pizza restraunt in the front and an auto repair bussiness in back.
visited my old rink/detail shop. they added roll up doors, but could easily become a ink again floor looked serviceable, and inside wasn't gutted. or walled in. heck wiith alittle money could be made even better then old. the baturds were using it to park cars.it asover flow for the new car dealerssuch a waste. speaking of waste another ild rink was vaxent for 5 years... they planed to build a retirement home in its place, but it was located on the hayward faultm so that never got started, it sat empty until it burned down last year. what a waste. it could have perhaps stayed a rink. for a few more years and it had a nactive artistic club.
Bill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 18th, 2009, 12:43 PM   #52
Poobah
Senior Member
 
Poobah's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 4,272
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BackofthePack View Post
What would you consider something reasonable? And are we talking dead rink time or a time slot where they would be open for something else?

Rinks cost money to operate, ans as much as it might sound simple to you it's far more complex than just having someone there to unlock the doors. To heat a building that size is not cheap. Insurance is not cheap. City fees, taxes, utilities, etc., all have to be paid. If something breaks, someone has to be paid to fix it. $300 is pretty cheap to rent much of anything for several hours nowadays. You get 30 Derby skaters paying $10 bucks each and you just covered your 2 hour practice. That's about the price of a movie. Sounds reasonable to me. Especially if it's dead rink time. How much cheaper do you want it?
Dead time. And it's not all that reasonable when you consider that leagues tend to vary between six to nine hours of practice a week. So what you're suggesting is $45 per skater per week, or ~$180 per month.

It's the only rink in town, which I think is the bulk of the problem. The owner had been approached numerous times about this. Tried to factor in pizzas as part of the deal. Can you say "doesn't get that this isn't a birthday party?"

Most leagues pay considerably less than this for practice. Even with the gas prices they've found cheaper space to skate in the next county. And this place sits empty, not making money during those times.

Inline hockey venues are generally a good bit easier to work with. Their business model is all about sports leagues (and this is one they can make FAR MORE money from at game time), they're used to USARS, and less squeamish in general.
__________________
*~[
Grand Poobah
Stats Geek
Poobah is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 18th, 2009, 12:57 PM   #53
Poobah
Senior Member
 
Poobah's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 4,272
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill in Houston View Post
Kids derby leagues? Really? I typed more, but deleted it...
Usually it's basically WFTDA-rules derby but with only positional blocking allowed. At least one league has a "skater tots" program for five to ten year olds which does it in a roundabout way involving flags.

There's currently ten to twelve kids derby leagues around the U.S. More forming up every day. There's an association of leagues that's been in the process of getting formed up for a while now. The nearest one to you is the Austin Derby Brats. What's amazing about the league is that the two women's leagues (which formed from a rather hostile split a few years back) actually work together to support it.

The oldest and most successful league would be Tucson Derby Brats. Their first skater recently graduated to Tucson Roller Derby when she turned 18, already made the travel team and is likely to become the Rookie of the Year. I'm looking forward to seeing how she does in this weekend's tournament in Colorado.

Almost every established adult league in the Pacific Northwest has a junior league as well. Once their kids get too old for the junior leagues, either their adult leagues or leagues around the country (wherever they attend college) are likely to gain some VERY EXPERIENCED new skaters.
Poobah is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 4th, 2009, 03:38 AM   #54
OffTheEdge
DjC Rockin' The Beat!
 
OffTheEdge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Winder, GA
Posts: 1,750
Default

My local rink opened in 81 0r 82 called "The Skate Place" located in lawrenceville GA. It closed in the early 90's but was bought out by the "Sparkles" chain. They put in a wood floor and things looked good. A few years later they closed to remodel. When they opened back up, they shortened the floor and added a playground. Now I hate the play ground ( because they say im too old to go in LOL ) but the floor is still pretty big. They have a Friday night "teen night" from 7-12 and its packed! Probably 300 people. Saturday is open all day from 11 - 11. They have 5 party rooms, 1 VIP party room and they stay booked. I asked once how many people come on saturday and I was told over 600, in shifts. Some come early, mid day and then night. But you can go all day for $8.50. Not a bad price for 12 hours. They give you an arm band so you can leave to go to dinner and come back! I am 42 and I skate good enough though I am not the best skater there by far, but good enough to be able to avoid the kids while shuffle / shadow skating with my friends. I think they are successful because of the hours and the rules. You can eat and drink anywhere you want. You don't have to stay in the snack bar area. Jam skaters can skate in the middle and do all their moves without being told not to. They will ask the jam skaters to stay on one end so parents can take their small children in the middle on the other end which is a good idea. You can skate backwards when ever you want. I went to a rink a few weeks ago and when I did a turn and skated backwards for a few feet the floor guard told me " no backwards skating allowed during an all skate" so we left. The DJ takes request. They have 2 "jam/shadow skate" songs every session for advanced skaters only. They have 2 speed skate songs every session. They have a blackout skate where you have to have a lighted item. They just do it right to keep people comming back. They have adult night sunday and have a good turn out. The manager, Dianne just knows how to run a rink.
__________________
Factory Authorized Riedell Dealer
Sales & Service @ www.eastcoastrollersports.com
www.facebook.com/eastcoastrollersports
OffTheEdge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 4th, 2009, 07:21 AM   #55
BusterT
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Australia
Posts: 39
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by OffTheEdge View Post
.......The manager, Dianne just knows how to run a rink.
I'd have to say that this probably has lot to do with it; the program that they run. There's a couple of rinks where I am, and I would rather travel to the furtherance ones because the closest one just doesn't have a decent program &/or little variety.


Quote:
I went to a rink a few weeks ago and when I did a turn and skated backwards for a few feet the floor guard told me " no backwards skating allowed during an all skate" so we left.
I just think that's retarded. I mean, what's the point . Should of taken your skates off, and put them back on backwards & skated that way .
BusterT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 5th, 2009, 12:46 AM   #56
Footwork
Ray Ninness Bedford, NH
 
Footwork's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Bedford, NH
Posts: 1,544
Thumbs up ZACTLY

No one has the time, there are so many other interests and distractions. When I was acively skating and competiting. I regularly skated seven days a week, Saturdays and Sundays I usually skated a couple of times a day..I had a key to the rink, and no my parents didn't own it..

Today kids and adults just have too many influences in their lives and the nember of peole willing to try skating is just shrinking..



Quote:
Originally Posted by gem View Post
Surely times have changed and internet, iphone, etc are now a part of everyones life to some extent and to many their life is totally consumed by technology. Incredible the addiction that technology has on so many people. Having said that, there are people who crave other things and being part of a sport(not TV) is part of that life as is with most on this site. Granted we all have different reasons for skating but in the end a most enjoyable sport of whichever type of skating do. As to get the other people aways from their addiction of technology, maybe WIFI, with the standard items would help?
__________________
Ray Ninness
Bedford, NH
http://www.F8Photos.com
Footwork is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 5th, 2009, 04:34 PM   #57
retread
Senior Member
 
retread's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 575
Default

From the I could have told you so department:
The new 4 million dollar rink in Woodlawn MD (kissing the Baltimore border) is currently closed. 2 shootings. From what I understand, just prior to the shootings, the new, state of the art rink was completely trashed.

Bob
retread is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 6th, 2009, 01:33 AM   #58
7Skaters
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Ohio
Posts: 1,312
Default

I think it's a bit of everything...

Location - you don't want to be out in the middle of nowhere, but you don't want serious competition from another rink that's all of 2 minutes away, either.

Rules - if they're too strict, people won't come. If they're too loose, the good skaters will head outside or to another rink. Some are fine with the "no backwards skating whenever you feel like it" during session, others prefer to be allowed to do what they want, when they want...have sessions for both types of skaters. Kids who are constant trouble makers should be banned, maybe one week for first offense, by the third time or so, it's a permanent ban or the like...weed out those who are there to cause trouble to get the good skaters, who want to be there, to come back. There is a VERY distinct line between ruling with an iron fist and not caring at all...but there has to be some balance of the two.

Cost - including everything...insurance, admission, consession, etc.

You want to make SOME profit, of course, so high insurance with few skaters can tank a rink.

I also think even $6 for a 2 1/2 - 3 hour session is a bit steep, though that could be due to having a family of 7 skaters.

When skating, kids (and most adults) WILL get hungry/thirsty...the consession stand prices CAN be lowered a bit.

I mean, pop is generally around $1 or so now (at BOTH rinks - maybe someone was reading from the other rink I go to LOL)...but we buy that $1 pop to share between the 7 of us then just use the cup and get "refills" of water at the drinking fountian.

If they could slash the cost a bit...40 cents, maybe even up to 50 cents, people would be more likely to get more. We easily go through 3 drinks per session. $3 for a 3 hour session, 1 drink per hours...not TOO bad. However, if we did get them all as pop for 50 cents, I'd gladly get each kid - as well as the hubby and I - at least one round of our OWN drinks...which would mean paying $3.50...spendign an extra 50 cents to get our "own" would also mean more for each person and fewer trips to the drinking fountain for all of us.

I don't know much about the price of fountain drinks, but buying in bulk and such (candy, pop, even the hot dogs and pizza, etc.) the cost "per cup/slice/whatever" is a lot lower and I'm sure rinks COULD charge less while still making a profit, since more would be willing to buy that extra slice of pizza or one more piece of candy.

"Specials" - anymore, they're needed to reel people in. Adult nights, Dollar Nights, Charity Skates, etc. are all helpful, but if an owner/manager (especially for a new rink) doesn't want to do them, the rink is "almost" sunk from the get go.

Right now, Birthday Parties and the School Skating Parties are where they make the most money, plus the video games/novelties. If rinks had more stuff catering to specific demographics throughout the week, and during weekend sessions, they could nix the games/novelties and possibly get more to care about the rink, maybe even making a bigger rink once the games and crap are taken out.

I cringe every time I see a glow stick or kids spending all their allowence in the game room (and whatever "extra" mom or dad gave them for the day). I've seen kids go in, put on skates, and spend the entire session on the games, trying to get enough tickets to get that "prize" that they need hundreds (or a even a thousand) tickets to "buy", never once even getting on the floor.

Music - again, that's ONE of the reasons I prefer "my" rink over "hubby's" rink. "His" rink plays nothing but the new stuff. "My" rink has a bit of everything.

Session "Specials" - "Dances" like the Hokey Pokey and such are great for kids, but never ONCE have I seen an adult go out there, at either rink we go to, which isn't that big of a deal, since "my" rink, even during session skates, often have an adults only time, a time for kids under a certain age or between certain ages, they still do the stoop skate, etc.

Owners/Managers - those who don't care...it shows. Those who do care...it also shows. Crabby and "mean" in a bigger rink with OR without the trouble makers will always send me to a smaller rink where the wokers are more laid back and friendly, preferably with those who know how to follow the rules, but a couple bad apples doesn't ruin it for me, as long as they're taken care of when needed. Those who've been doing it for a while and/or those who truly love skating, USUALLY make better owners and/or operators...they care about what's going on, they want to reel in the better skaters who play by the rules. Those who are in it just to make money often go out of business faster, but when you allow "anyone" in, it's the price you pay.

MOSTLY, I'd say it's the money issue, but even the little things DO matter to many skaters.
7Skaters is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 7th, 2009, 03:03 AM   #59
Dennis Lauer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Northwest Ohio
Posts: 329
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by 7Skaters View Post
I think it's a bit of everything...

Location - you don't want to be out in the middle of nowhere, but you don't want serious competition from another rink that's all of 2 minutes away, either.

Rules - if they're too strict, people won't come. If they're too loose, the good skaters will head outside or to another rink. Some are fine with the "no backwards skating whenever you feel like it" during session, others prefer to be allowed to do what they want, when they want...have sessions for both types of skaters. Kids who are constant trouble makers should be banned, maybe one week for first offense, by the third time or so, it's a permanent ban or the like...weed out those who are there to cause trouble to get the good skaters, who want to be there, to come back. There is a VERY distinct line between ruling with an iron fist and not caring at all...but there has to be some balance of the two.

Cost - including everything...insurance, admission, consession, etc.

You want to make SOME profit, of course, so high insurance with few skaters can tank a rink.

I also think even $6 for a 2 1/2 - 3 hour session is a bit steep, though that could be due to having a family of 7 skaters.

When skating, kids (and most adults) WILL get hungry/thirsty...the consession stand prices CAN be lowered a bit.

I mean, pop is generally around $1 or so now (at BOTH rinks - maybe someone was reading from the other rink I go to LOL)...but we buy that $1 pop to share between the 7 of us then just use the cup and get "refills" of water at the drinking fountian.

If they could slash the cost a bit...40 cents, maybe even up to 50 cents, people would be more likely to get more. We easily go through 3 drinks per session. $3 for a 3 hour session, 1 drink per hours...not TOO bad. However, if we did get them all as pop for 50 cents, I'd gladly get each kid - as well as the hubby and I - at least one round of our OWN drinks...which would mean paying $3.50...spendign an extra 50 cents to get our "own" would also mean more for each person and fewer trips to the drinking fountain for all of us.

I don't know much about the price of fountain drinks, but buying in bulk and such (candy, pop, even the hot dogs and pizza, etc.) the cost "per cup/slice/whatever" is a lot lower and I'm sure rinks COULD charge less while still making a profit, since more would be willing to buy that extra slice of pizza or one more piece of candy.

"Specials" - anymore, they're needed to reel people in. Adult nights, Dollar Nights, Charity Skates, etc. are all helpful, but if an owner/manager (especially for a new rink) doesn't want to do them, the rink is "almost" sunk from the get go.

Right now, Birthday Parties and the School Skating Parties are where they make the most money, plus the video games/novelties. If rinks had more stuff catering to specific demographics throughout the week, and during weekend sessions, they could nix the games/novelties and possibly get more to care about the rink, maybe even making a bigger rink once the games and crap are taken out.

I cringe every time I see a glow stick or kids spending all their allowence in the game room (and whatever "extra" mom or dad gave them for the day). I've seen kids go in, put on skates, and spend the entire session on the games, trying to get enough tickets to get that "prize" that they need hundreds (or a even a thousand) tickets to "buy", never once even getting on the floor.

Music - again, that's ONE of the reasons I prefer "my" rink over "hubby's" rink. "His" rink plays nothing but the new stuff. "My" rink has a bit of everything.

Session "Specials" - "Dances" like the Hokey Pokey and such are great for kids, but never ONCE have I seen an adult go out there, at either rink we go to, which isn't that big of a deal, since "my" rink, even during session skates, often have an adults only time, a time for kids under a certain age or between certain ages, they still do the stoop skate, etc.

Owners/Managers - those who don't care...it shows. Those who do care...it also shows. Crabby and "mean" in a bigger rink with OR without the trouble makers will always send me to a smaller rink where the wokers are more laid back and friendly, preferably with those who know how to follow the rules, but a couple bad apples doesn't ruin it for me, as long as they're taken care of when needed. Those who've been doing it for a while and/or those who truly love skating, USUALLY make better owners and/or operators...they care about what's going on, they want to reel in the better skaters who play by the rules. Those who are in it just to make money often go out of business faster, but when you allow "anyone" in, it's the price you pay.

MOSTLY, I'd say it's the money issue, but even the little things DO matter to many skaters.

7skaters I like your thinking on this, now how do we find rinks that fit your description, or better yet influence rink owners to change over to this way of thinking?

Dennis Lauer
Dennis Lauer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 7th, 2009, 03:47 AM   #60
7Skaters
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Ohio
Posts: 1,312
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dennis Lauer View Post
7skaters I like your thinking on this, now how do we find rinks that fit your description, or better yet influence rink owners to change over to this way of thinking?

Dennis Lauer
Go to your local rink(s) often...as many different sessions as possibe...get to know the people: guards, consession stand workers, managers, owners, and be aware of who's there at which sessions.

Once you're a regular fixture, and know the demographics in the area, start throwing out suggestions. Get others there to get on board, especially talking to other adult skaters and parents of the children who go. Maybe even start a petition for what you feel is important to your rink(s). There is power in numbers. If you get more who want a change, the more likely you are to get the change(s) you desire.

Baby steps first...rinks that have the fewest problems...since the fewer the problems, the more likely it is that they care and will listen. If the owner/manager lets it go in one ear and out the other (that "vacant" expression, keeps checking his/her watch, general fidgeting, etc.), move on to another rink that has some problems, but is still overall generally good. Save those that need the most help for last...or skip them all together. ONE good rink in your area is all you really need...but the more, the better.

Also, don't just say "You should really do something about those kids over there."...have a possible solution (ban them for a week, call their parents to come pick them up "now", etc.). Have some suggestions to help the problems you see.

As a whole...everyone on this board, reading this thread (and those who do could try to get the word to other rink skaters)...who would do this could vastly help rinks across the nation. And possibly even the world, with as many fellow skaters here who aren't in the USA.
7Skaters is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 01:47 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.