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Old December 12th, 2017, 10:48 PM   #1
Everybodyknows
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Default Roll-Line Magnum vs Ice Wheels Review

One year ago I too up skating again after several years break. I kicked it of by purchasing some new boots: Black Risport Antares on Roll-Line Variant M plates with Roll-Line Magnum 53D ō55mm wheels with NMB bearings.

Here they are after approximately 150 hours of fairly hard family rink skating:





I want to focus on the wheels in this review as I have just changed them for Roll-Line Ice wheels, so this is a perfect opportunity for a comparison...

ROLL-LINE MAGNUM WHEELS

POSITIVES
These wheels are made of hard plastic, which sounds cheap and nasty, but these are actually quite incredible wheels. The larger diameter versions are used for artistic performances and figure loops and although they are at the budget end of the Roll-Line range they are still expertly manufactured.

The rigidity of the solid plastic gives them fantastic roll. I have loved the way that with minimal push I can glide for huge distances and with minimal effort get up really good speed.

I have found them to provide very stable and positive contact so when I turn from forward to backwards skating or vice versa, I can rely on them to immediately provide a firm footing even as I throw my weight onto one foot.

NEGATIVES

Plastic wheels like these are rated on the D durometer scale. 53D is very hard - well above the top of the A scale for polyurethane wheels which tops out at 100A. This makes them slippery on some surfaces. At my main rink (which has some kind of tile-look surface - very good for general skating) I find that I get a little slip at the last part of a push off - when my leg is furthest extended and my weight is just lifting. It's disconcerting, but I have learned to accommodate it so it happens far less often now. On my mid-week polished wooden parquet floor it is far worse and I have had to work hard to keep upright. That said - it was actually quite fun to play with the slip once I got used to it.

These wheels are noisy. Especially on the wooden floor of the village hall on which I skate mid-week. It's almost embarrassing as everyone else glides around in silence. On the main local rink, which has a tiled basketball floor, this is much less of a problem.

Magnums get flats very easily. You can't slide sideways or drag them. Hockey stops are completely out of the question. As is coming to a stop with that satisfying wheel screech - which I used to be able to do so easily years ago on my old red krypton wheels.

The first flat I made was quite bad, and probably from doing a tee stop at speed - fatal. After that it rumbled noisily vibrating my foot badly. I fixed it with a sander which reduced the rumble to a small vibration and over the weeks it slowly wore itself smooth again.

The problem is I love to swerve, throwing my weight right over from left to right on tight edges. Recently after a really great evening of disco dancing at speed I managed to put multiple small flats in several places:

You can see the flats in the close-up above. Simultaneous damage to three wheels left my right boot rumbling like nobody's business. I realised it was time to replace them. I also knew I wanted to try something new, so after a lot of umming and ahhing. I went for these:

Roll-Line Ice, 95A, ō63mm with ABEC 9 bearings






ROLL-LINE ICE WHEELS - FIRST IMPRESSIONS

These wheels have replaced Roll-Line Grease and Super Speed Race wheels. They are the only wheels Roll Line now has in its 'dance' category, but SkatesUS classes them as great for Derby, Recreational, Rhythm and Jam (Not sure what they all are) and good for quad hockey - so I think they will be great for my rinks and skating style.

These wheels are gorgeous to behold. The hubs feel really solid - like they are made of an alloy. The 'thin tyre' of special 'tri-compound' Urethane feels slick and being thin does not compress like urethane wheels without a hub. This should give them a lot of roll - although perhaps not as much as the magnums - but with more grip. They will probably also be more resistant to flats.

The Abec bearings have a yellow dust guards which match the cushions on my plates - that was a lucky coincidence, and I think it looks nice.

An interesting thing about the wheels - which I think has been mentioned somewhere else on this forum - is the shape of the inside of the wheels - they are chamfered, which keeps the tread narrow for better roll. Also, the printing is on this inside chamfer, leaving the visible outside face of the wheel clean and smart.

Compared to the magnums these feel like a step up in quality. Not sure if the additional height / diameter will affect my skating or how long they will take to get used to. I'm hoping that I will gain some additional grip without losing too much roll. Will soon see.

I have only given them a go around the kitchen so far and they felt fantastic - smooth, silent and agile. Once I have given them a couple of hours at the rink I will post an update.

Last edited by Everybodyknows; December 13th, 2017 at 08:10 PM.
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Old December 13th, 2017, 01:45 AM   #2
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Looking forward to your review!
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Old December 13th, 2017, 02:53 AM   #3
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Those Magnums look like they pick up a lot of dirt. I think you will be much happier with the Ice wheels.

I skate on Roll Line Formulas and love them. They are more gripping (88A) than the ones you have, but the floor I skate on is rather slippery.

The next set of wheels I get is going to be Scott Corey's. Everyone here reommends them so they must have something going for them.
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Old December 13th, 2017, 02:36 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Everybodyknows View Post
I love to swerve, throwing my weight right over from left to right on tight edges.
Same here.

It takes some serious effort to flatten a wheel that hard.

I skate a fairly hard wheel since I do a lot of twists and turns and have some moves where I drag my wheels.

I'm slowly moving to a softer wheel as I gain more strength and experience.

I have not had a flat since I was 13. But I haven't T-stopped since then either. And the harder wheels help.
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Old December 13th, 2017, 07:58 PM   #5
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Same here.

It takes some serious effort to flatten a wheel that hard.

I skate a fairly hard wheel since I do a lot of twists and turns and have some moves where I drag my wheels.

I'm slowly moving to a softer wheel as I gain more strength and experience.

I have not had a flat since I was 13. But I haven't T-stopped since then either. And the harder wheels help.
Iím not so sure about that. I used to skate on krypton wheels which were really soft, but they were impossible to flat, even with T stops (which is where I learned the bad habit!). I think it depends on the polymer. Urethane, I suspect, has more resistance to abrasion. The durometer (Shore hardness) scales measure the degree of flexibility or rigidity. When we say 95A is Ďharderí than 85A it really means the 95A is Ďless compressibleí. That means it flexes less and so wastes less energy - hence you can roll faster. I suspect that even though plastic wheels are much harder (less flexible) than Urethane, they wear more easily being a different material.

Yes! Iíve found a graph that shows it:



ďThe outstanding abrasion resistance of cast urethane elastomers has benefited hundreds of applications where severe wear presents a serious problem such as ore mining and sand and gravel processing. Field applications have proven open cast polyurethanes provide a definite wear advantage due it its superior abrasion-resistant properties. In working service, molded polyurethane has outworn rubbers and plastics, as well as steel and even ceramics. often by a factor of 10 to 1. The table below provides a comparison of abrasion resistant properties of open cast polyurethane with rubber and plastics.Ē
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Old December 14th, 2017, 12:22 AM   #6
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Did you skate the krypton indoors or outdoors?
Indoors harder wheels work great but donít go over grains of sand, and yes, hard wheels go fast on hard surfaces, while outdoors soft wheels absorbe pebbles and sticks and just roll over them, the outdoor Douro range is 78-88,I prefer around 82, and I prefer roll line helium wheels, they have the same DELRIN hub as the ice but not covered with chrome, I notice roll line says it ships wheel spacers with its plates, I say it doesnít, bought a set of matrix plates, no spacers.
Anyway it say it wants spacers installed with roll line wheels to keep the bearings from being pinched, and it explains that by using newer nuts with nylock itís not nesessary to snug the nuts as much, but roll line still recommends wheel spacers, many discussions about spacers here on the log, the consensus is they are rubbish, figures. The consensus about bearings is to use the cheapest possible, so obviously, any advice here is to be mixed with salt
Spacers, my last two sets of helium wheels have severe wheel bite when leaned on at low speed, so, Iím going to try spacers, Iím very familiar with them and used them for years, to be exact, I used them until I ran into the log, err skatelog
Iím also going to grab a set of ice in an 88a, 63mm, with the new Tri Compoung polymer Formula, Ha, the helium are urethane, and possibly the formula, but my money is on the ice being a mixture of urathane and plastic, roll line doesnít really say.
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Old December 14th, 2017, 07:38 PM   #7
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Did you skate the krypton indoors or outdoors?
Indoors. I inherited them from a mate who skated on them outdoors for years back in the 1980s. I used them throughout the 2000s in a rink when my kids got into rink skating. Eventually the boots fell apart! Here they are at the end:



Quote:
Indoors harder wheels work great but donít go over grains of sand, and yes, hard wheels go fast on hard surfaces, while outdoors soft wheels absorbe pebbles and sticks and just roll over them...
Yes, the magnums stopped dead on the smallest bit of grit - threw me over more than once at my mid week venue as people before us brought it in on their shoes.

Quote:
I notice roll line says it ships wheel spacers with its plates, I say it doesnít, bought a set of matrix plates, no spacer...
I made a point of asking my suppliers to provide spacers and instal the bearings for me when I ordered them. The spacers were free.

Quote:
many discussions about spacers here on the log, the consensus is they are rubbish, figures. The consensus about bearings is to use the cheapest possible, so obviously, any advice here is to be mixed with salt
Spacers, my last two sets of helium wheels have severe wheel bite when leaned on at low speed, so, Iím going to try spacers, Iím very familiar with them and used them for years, to be exact, I used them until I ran into the log, err skatelog
Can't comment on that. I've used spacers with the Magnum and Ice. No issues for me. I guess that the Helium wheels are quote flexible, so the spacers are more necessary than in a stiffer hub like Magnum and Ice. As for bearings my Speed Race Abec 9s were not cheap, but they look cool!

Quote:
Iím also going to grab a set of ice in an 88a, 63mm, with the new Tri Compoung polymer Formula, Ha, the helium are urethane, and possibly the formula, but my money is on the ice being a mixture of urathane and plastic, roll line doesnít really say.
Yeah, who knows? Perhaps the plastic element (if it's in there) will make them more prone to flats ... I assume you are in the US where a set of ICE cost over $110. Here in the UK I can get them for £60.
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Old December 14th, 2017, 08:05 PM   #8
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The chemical mix of the wheels will determine how resilient the wheel is to flattening. Ran that test a long time ago. Scott's wheels did not flatten, much less get damage from anything I threw at the 2 sets I tested. Had those wheels for about a month. I was told to beat them up by the owner, the wheels laughed.... and are still laughing.
Bearings, not the cheapest, but no need in spending more than $50 on bearings. But spend as you like, Id rather buy wheels. Wheels make way more impact on your skating than bearings ever will.

Last edited by fierocious1; December 14th, 2017 at 09:46 PM.
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Old December 17th, 2017, 02:39 AM   #9
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I like ice wheels, but many find they flat on t-stops, etc. Mine did, of course it depends on floor too.
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Old December 17th, 2017, 02:07 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by netplaceus View Post
I like ice wheels, but many find they flat on t-stops, etc. Mine did, of course it depends on floor too.
I agree with this, a grippy floor can flat spot a wheel quickly. Less grip, less chance of damage. With Anabolix "The Tire", I put on a new set of tires one weekend, went to Dairy Ashford rink and found a piece of junk on the floor. I was skating a new set of tires for about 10 minutes, hit the debris, badly flat spotted a tire in an instant.
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Old December 23rd, 2017, 01:39 AM   #11
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So how about the Ice wheels?
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