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Artistic Skating Forum Discussions about any topic related to artistic roller skating including quad artistic skating, inline figure skating, pairs, dance, synchronized skating, and show skating.

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Old December 30th, 2019, 08:28 PM   #1
netplaceus
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Default Different hardness wheels on the same skate

I currently have Roll-line Panthers on all 8 wheels (95A). I am wondering if I might get better spins (toe-toe) with a combination of Mustang's (97A) or Leopard's (99A) with my Panthers?

I have not experimented with hardness combinations before, I sakte mostly freestyle on wood floors.

Looking for advice. What are the the pros and cons of mixing it up?

What combinations do you recommend and how would you arrange them on the skate?

Thanks for your help!
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Riedell 336 Boot , Roll-Line Energy plate, Roll-Line Panther wheels -95A, Me: 165 lb, 6'2"
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Old January 1st, 2020, 12:24 PM   #2
larryoracing
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Default For whatever it worth...gives me a chance to show off my new skates

https://ibb.co/7nvzr6T

the above link is for my new skates....Energy plate..painted gold...Berry Freestyle/Figure boots, which I painted black and gold..they were originally white...got a good deal on them..half price sale from Patricia at Berry Skates..and I have not skated on these wheels in a while but they are the Roll Line 99A wheels on all eight wheels...the Berry boot is from Argentina and very stiff...has taken me six months to break in.

the harder the wheel, you would think the easier it is to spin...I'm using Bones 103A for everything..real loops, forward dances, freestyle and turn figures...on all 8 wheels...on my freestyle skates that I was using before the change I was using the Roll Line 99A wheel on all 8 wheels..I did not checker board my wheels..did not know how or the theory for checker boarding??????

I think most people "checkerboard" their wheels with the grippier wheel on the wheel you spin on..for instance if you were doing LIB (left inner back) Spin I would think the LF (left front inside) ,like your Roll Line 95 A wheels..going to the 97A or 99A wheels to the other 3 wheels?

Let's say most people do LOF (left outer forward) spin, .... the LOB (left outer back) wheel would be your 95A grip wheel. and lets say you also do a LIB (left inner back spin) then you LIF (left inner forward wheel) would be your gripper wheel...on the left skate you would have a grippier 95A wheel on the LOB (Left outer back wheel) and the grippier wheel 95A on the LIF (left inner forward wheel)...hence the "checker board" pattern of wheels on the left skate.....I would assume the same idea applies to the right skate doing the ROB (Right Outer back) spin and the ROF (right outer forward) wheel would be your grippier wheel..hope that helps a little bit???????????????????? and good luck...
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Old January 2nd, 2020, 10:40 AM   #3
Oicusk82huh
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Default

It seems that a lot of figure skaters have 3 hard wheels on each edge and then one softer "push" wheel on both front inside wheels.

Toe-toe spins are easier on harder and smaller wheels.

What plate are you on?
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Old January 2nd, 2020, 11:54 PM   #4
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Than you all so much for your replies , very useful information!
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Old February 11th, 2020, 06:46 AM   #5
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I don't think the hardness of wheel matters much if at all for spins that are toe/toe or heel spins, because you are not experiencing the friction of an edge spin, and are just pivoting around on two wheels (or 4 if you're doing a 2 foot spin). A wheel that is smaller, which lowers your center of gravity should help with balance though. When I used to jam skate I used very soft wheels, and did toe and heel spins with no issue.
However, if you're doing an edge spin, then the hardness of wheel would matter. You would want the harder wheel to be the wheel that is sliding on the floor, and the softer wheel as the pivoting wheel, or any wheel that is not the slide wheel, to allow you better grip for spotting the spin. For artistic skaters that rotate in the CCW direction, doing the standard edge spins, Larry's advice is spot on, that is the right idea.
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Old February 13th, 2020, 07:58 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slinkydog View Post
I don't think the hardness of wheel matters much if at all for spins that are toe/toe or heel spins, because you are not experiencing the friction of an edge spin, and are just pivoting around on two wheels (or 4 if you're doing a 2 foot spin). A wheel that is smaller, which lowers your center of gravity should help with balance though. When I used to jam skate I used very soft wheels, and did toe and heel spins with no issue.
However, if you're doing an edge spin, then the hardness of wheel would matter. You would want the harder wheel to be the wheel that is sliding on the floor, and the softer wheel as the pivoting wheel, or any wheel that is not the slide wheel, to allow you better grip for spotting the spin. For artistic skaters that rotate in the CCW direction, doing the standard edge spins, Larry's advice is spot on, that is the right idea.
Thank you so much! This is awesome detailed advice!
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Old February 21st, 2020, 12:03 AM   #7
Sir Aaron
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Quote:
Originally Posted by larryoracing View Post
https://ibb.co/7nvzr6T

the above link is for my new skates....Energy plate..painted gold....
You painted it yourself? That's pretty cool. I've wanted to paint mine black.
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Old February 21st, 2020, 12:16 AM   #8
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Your preferred wheel setup will be decided by which spins you are doing. However, for those who spin in counter clockwise pattern (virtually everyone) the typical setup is a "checkerboard pattern." You just remember it this way. Since most of your spins will be a LIB variety, then the soft wheel goes on the left big toe. Then you just fill in the checkerboard from there.

Hard - Soft Hard - Soft
Soft - Hard Soft - Hard
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Old February 24th, 2020, 04:05 PM   #9
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Depends on what is comfortable for you. The pros are I notice that slicker wheels take the pressure off your joints when doing spins, pivot moves and makes it so you don't have to work so hard, and you are less sore and tired after skating. The cons are you may not be able to perform a lot of different moves you could do with your other wheels and you'll find you hit the floor harder and more often ().

My set up is the Roll Line Dance plate, Edea Classica Boot, 3 All American Plus wheels (103A - 2 in the front and one in the back on the outside), and 1 Fomac wheel (Way slicker than 103A - back inside). I can spin in the CW or CCW direction, whether it is toe-toe, heel-toe, heel-heel, one-foot toe spins, flat-foot/one-foot spins or two-foot spins, etc. When I had those 96A wheels, I found I was a lot more tired and my joints were crazy sore after sessions at the rink. Switched the wheels and never looked back!
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