S k a t e L o g     F o r u m
Inline Skating and Quad Roller Skating
Forum Hosts: Jessica Wright | Kathie Fry

FOLLOW US: Our Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Email    


Home - Forum Index - Africa Skating - Asia Skating - Europe Skating - Oceania Skating - Pan America Skating - Roller_Rinks - Friend the SkateLog Forum in Facebook - SkateLog Forum on Facebook

Forum Administrators: Jessica Wright and Kathie Fry | Email Us
Access code for buying and selling subforums: "skates"
How To Get a User Account and Posting Privileges in the SkateLog Forum
Use Google to Search the SkateLog Forum

Go Back   SkateLog Forum > General Interest Skating Forums > Beginning Skaters Forum
FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Beginning Skaters Forum This is the place for beginning skaters to ask questions and share their stories. We would love to hear about your experiences learning to skate. No question is too dumb!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old December 24th, 2014, 01:50 AM   #1
BullHorn
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 8
Default First time skating in 10 years - insights and questions

Hey guys,

It feels like I'm the only one making threads here! I guess there aren't many new-comers here...

Anyhow, I just did a 20km ride around in Tel Aviv with a bunch of skaters and cyclists dressed like Santa Claus.

Surprisingly, my brand new (and way overpriced) pair of Seba SX skates returned home with some damage to the scotch-strap's buckle, as well as the smart-buckle. I'll probably write a review about this skate in a while, once I've used it for at least 200km.

Questions I have so far:
1) A lot of skates come without the brake. 10 years ago I had a pair of Salomon skates with a brake and it was AMAZING, it let me stop from my top speed to 0 in less than 3 meters of skidding. But now, I no longer have the privilege...
Why are brakes disliked by so many people? And why is it normal for a skate above 'beginner' or 'intermediate' to not have a brake? Obviously, you can use all kinds of other brake methods but they are all a lot more expensive ($10 piece of rubber brake vs. ~$80-120 set of wheels)!

2) While going downhill, I was usually burning down my wheels by T-Stopping just to control my speed. At some point, I decided to just let it go as fast as I could and when I reached my top speed, both my skates/feet started shaking! I immediately engaged into T-Stopping to slow down and luckily wasn't hurt.
I've seen people going faster than me without issues. It could be technique or strength, but could it also be an issue with the skate? How can I know if the axles are not misaligned or not over-tightened?
I also noticed that I was picking up speed faster than most other people without doing anything - It might be a combination of new and decent quality bearings and thin-profile wheels ("ROLLERBLADE HYDROGEN 80MM/85A"). It's easy to assume that the wheels thickness/shape has a big role in stability while going quickly...

Anyhow, I'd love to hear your thoughts and suggestions.
Thanks!
BullHorn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 25th, 2014, 04:18 AM   #2
MANY_SkatingDave
Skating = Tear RIFF ic
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Massachusetts: N. Central & NE
Posts: 4,650
Default

Hi Bullhorn,

Just caught your note as I was leaving this site.

First Off Happy End of Year, and the Holiday you celebrate.

1)Braking with InLines.
- First off I never learned how to do that, since when I skated on InLines no one taught me how to brake. Everyone I watched in the 90s did it wrong. So I gave up and used other stopping techniques on my first set of blades. I actually wanted to chop it off.

I do not know that the back brake is disliked. It seems from watching and riding with real skaters the opinion varies, which is good. Some like it, use it and some don't. BTW our Kathie from this list likes it, and probably knows how to use it.

1a) I do have long time friends that use it well

1b) I was trying to tell some young parents recently about how to use that brake, yet they thought it better for their kids to learn the crash and fall.. Oh Well

Gone for now, yet I only answered your Question 1, Sorry

Yours in Skating, MA/NY Skating Dave
P.S. Please no one PM me, I am at 100% and don't seem to have the time to clean it out.
__________________
InDoor Quads: Witch Doctor Wheels, Bones Swiss/Qube-Gold Bearings, Older RollerBlade Wrist Guards -| InDoor Clothes: Cargo Shorts, Sweat Towel
MANY_SkatingDave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 26th, 2014, 12:04 PM   #3
Derrick
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Northeastern Indiana
Posts: 1,322
Default Sounds like you need the break

I don't inline much anymore, but when I do it's on a flat pad or driveway. I take the break off only because it hits unexpectantly when I go backwards. I like dancing around insted of traveling the roads. So, it's very dependant on what you want to do. If I was going up and down hills, I'd put the break back on.
Derrick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 26th, 2014, 04:29 PM   #4
BullHorn
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 8
Default

Yeah, that's not common where I live. Most people are either into aggressive or just skating on the roads and streets where having to go up and down hills is not negotiable...
BullHorn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 26th, 2014, 05:42 PM   #5
WJCIV
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: London
Posts: 1,098
Default

Brakes can get in the way. If you go over a bump or curb they are liable to hit. Since they don't roll that causes a jolt. Also, when crossing over that's extra distance you have to move your foot forward to avoid hitting the opposite toe. And if you are in a pack your skates get pretty close to other skaters', so it's more of an opportunity to click skates. If I'm going to add another two inches to my frame it's to either put on bigger wheels for more roll or to lengthen the contact patch for more stability.

Stepping stops or rolling to a stop are not hard on the wheels. T-stops and hockey stops are, but that's not how I slow down or stop most of the time. I just roll until I'm slow enough to take a couple of steps with my toes turned out or in.

It's quite possible that your new bearings are in better shape than the people who haven't cleaned theirs in 6 months. Your wheels are new too, and might be higher quality than the skaters around you. That means they will roll without absorbing as much energy. There's also a question of how straight up you were standing to catch the wind.

As you get more used to inlines your stabilizer muscles in your ankles, knees, and hips will get stronger and allow you to control your shaking at higher speeds. If you get a longer frame that also provides more stability, so there isn't as much shaking. Frame alignment does play a part, as does wheel profile (shape). Axle alignment is not a problem, and overtightening is back for the equipment, but won't cause issues with your skating (you have spacer, right?). Once you get a feel for how tight axles should be there isn't a problem with checking them before each outing. If you don't have someone who can show you how tight that it you can get a torque wrench that will not allow you to overtighten them.

I would recommend you control your speed earlier rather than waiting until an emergency t-stop is necessary. Turn your toes very slightly in our out to create just a bit of dragging from the top of the hill. You can even do this with just one foot. Another option is what I would call scissoring - the feet go out to either side, then come back together. If you push on the way out you push yourself forward and speed up, but if you apply the power on the move back together you are pushing backwards and slowing yourself down instead.

It's not what Eddy Matzger calls scissors in this video with multiple different ways to control your speed. I forget what to current term for what I call scissors is.
__________________
You don't improve by training until it hurts; you improve by training after it hurts.

I love the phrase "I quit". It beats more of my opponents than I do.
WJCIV is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 27th, 2014, 02:02 AM   #6
BullHorn
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 8
Default

Here's a map of our skate session last week: https://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&t=m...sic&dg=feature

As you can see, it's full of steep hills. Your recommendation of controlling the speed earlier really isn't possible because you go from 0km/h to 25km/h in less than 10 seconds... So you end up having to apply all kinds of braking methods the entire time... But mind you, there's about 200 more inline skaters all around you wooshing and weezing all over the place. :P

But I see what you're saying and that video and scissor method can be really useful when it's not crowded.

Thanks
BullHorn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 27th, 2014, 03:44 AM   #7
MANY_SkatingDave
Skating = Tear RIFF ic
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Massachusetts: N. Central & NE
Posts: 4,650
Default Eddy's Scissors called Something Other

Hi Again,

That was a good video from Eddie and WJCIV. That move is made for high control inside of crowds and in difficult places. Tis a bit of the high speed Hockey Stop and some side sliding with your InLines. Much like a Power Slide, Hockey Stop and Other.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BullHorn View Post
Here's a map o - o As you can see, o - o Your recommendation of controlling the speed earlier really isn't possible because you go from 0km/h to 25km/h in less than 10 seconds... o - o But mind you, there's about 200 more inline skaters all around you wooshing and weezing all over the place. o - o
Other than Eddie's method which is Quite Advanced on big blades, You might try keeping your feet together as you go down the hill and swizzle left and right as you go down keeping your blades close to parallel and doing a little of what Eddie/WJCIV shows. I am not going to find it for you, yet we had an Australian do a nice video of how to control speed down steep hills. Also notice how he gets down low to sit back on his butt.

In situations like steep downhills using the brake is crazy, and dangerous unless you want to go down hill like a turtle. SO Advanced planning when a down hill approaches is key.

Good Luck, Hey Now I know why you are anti Brake. Your terrain does not lend itself to using the brake as the only stopping mechanism. No Flat roads for you.

Yours in Skating, MA/NY Skating Dave
__________________
InDoor Quads: Witch Doctor Wheels, Bones Swiss/Qube-Gold Bearings, Older RollerBlade Wrist Guards -| InDoor Clothes: Cargo Shorts, Sweat Towel
MANY_SkatingDave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 27th, 2014, 04:27 AM   #8
WJCIV
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: London
Posts: 1,098
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MANY_SkatingDave View Post
swizzle
That's the term. What I learned as scissors are what other people call swizzles. And once I had that term a quick search found that other people call it a lemon because that is the path your feet travel. It's really confusing because my team calls a slalom move swizzles, and that move is really close to the scissors in the video.

I can't find any good videos of swizzles being used for speed control. They all seem to show it as a way to increase speed because you apply the power to the part where you push your feet apart. However, you can coast your feet apart and push when bringing them together. It's hard to explain without a video, but watch the Matzger video I linked again when he's drawing with the chalk as to the part of the push where you apply power on the scissor. It's the same idea. Any move you make where your feet aren't pointed directly down the hill is going to help you not speed up as much. Any extra surface area you face into the wind (by standing up or wearing bulky clothing or the similar) will help as well. Certainly don't get right behind someone, since they will push air out of the way and give you a draft.

Scissors don't have to be as exaggerated as Eddy showed. He was going downhill with someone pushing him and overdoing it to make sure you could see it on camera. If you practice you can do it is a pretty confined side-to-side space.

If you can't slalom or scissor down the hill, could you turn your toes out and walk like a duck for the first half, then roll the rest? You might get some funny looks, but it is better to be safe and have people laughing at you than to run headlong into a bus.

There are aftermarket brakes you can add to your skates if you really want to.

25kph isn't really all that fast for an experienced skater. If your skates fit and you tie them properly you shouldn't have any problems with that in about a month. There's a hill in the A2A "race" that is long and steep. One year skaters were bragging about hitting 60mph, so the next year the organizers brought a radar gun. The fastest they actually clocked was 59.5mph (96kph). That had to be someone crazy. The fastest I have gone is probably on the order of 40mph (64kph).
__________________
You don't improve by training until it hurts; you improve by training after it hurts.

I love the phrase "I quit". It beats more of my opponents than I do.
WJCIV is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 27th, 2014, 04:53 AM   #9
slowsk8
Senior Member
 
slowsk8's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Tukwila, just south of Seattle
Posts: 1,940
Default

Note, when Eddy says scissor he is just talking about one foot in front of the other. Looking at the legs from the knees down they look like scissors. He is saying scissor the legs and turn sharp, always the leg on the inside of the turn in front.
Just so you know the turn is not called a scissor.
slowsk8 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 11:34 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.