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Beginning Skaters Forum This is the place for beginning skaters to ask questions and share their stories. We would love to hear about your experiences learning to skate. No question is too dumb!

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Old February 1st, 2015, 02:26 AM   #1
Nigel.NoMates
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Default Observations on switching from quad to inlines

Hey gang,
I have question for those of you skate both quads & inlines. I am a long time quad skater who strapped on a pair of inlines at the rink the other day.

The strangest thing I noticed was that when I was skating in the inlines I had to noticeably shift my weight forward as I was skating with the front wheels of my skates not really in contact with the floor.

They were rentals and could have been worn / poorly set up. I'm looking for feedback from those more knowledgable.

NN
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Old February 1st, 2015, 02:34 AM   #2
WJCIV
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That's absolutely a rental thing. I have yet to see a decent pair of rental inlines. If you looked down the wheels were probably completely worn to slant in one direction instead of being symmetric too.

There are setups called "rockered" which have a smaller wheels in the front, back, or both, but that's for specialized use.

I like to tell the kids I coach (speed) to imagine all their weight on the third wheel back on a four wheel skate.
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Old February 1st, 2015, 02:42 AM   #3
Nigel.NoMates
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I skate da45 - front axle under toe knuckle, rear axle under ankle bone, which is why I found the sensation somewhat strange - like I was skating with front wheels in the air. They were definitely worn to one side. ( I looked at that before I put them on.)
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Old February 1st, 2015, 02:57 AM   #4
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The wheels on those things are really cheap and they wear down easily. A lot of non-skaters tend to toe push a lot. You add those two together and the front wheel wears down faster than the others.
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Old February 2nd, 2015, 09:05 PM   #5
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Greetings

Skating quads is mostly balancing on your heels and skating inline is mostly balancing on your toes. It's most noticable when switching directly into one from the other.

I get a kick out of this. For some real fun I have a friend that puts an inline skate on one foot and a quad on the other. I still havent tried this, but he seems to think it's the greatest challenge.

Even if they weren't cheap skates youd notice the same difference.
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Old February 2nd, 2015, 09:28 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by Oicusk82huh View Post
Skating quads is mostly balancing on your heels and skating inline is mostly balancing on your toes. It's most noticable when switching directly into one from the other.
That must be discipline dependent. In speed (and what I have seen of trail/session skaters) the goal is to keep weight more-or-less evenly distributed across the wheels. If anything you want the weight slightly back toward the back wheels on both.

Actually, on quads there is a much debated "toe-flick" at the very end of the stride, but the general consensus is that it is not good on inlines.
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Old February 6th, 2015, 03:41 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WJCIV View Post
That must be discipline dependent. In speed (and what I have seen of trail/session skaters) the goal is to keep weight more-or-less evenly distributed across the wheels. If anything you want the weight slightly back toward the back wheels on both.

Actually, on quads there is a much debated "toe-flick" at the very end of the stride, but the general consensus is that it is not good on inlines.
I do the "toe flick" on both. It has its place, but knowing where to use it and how is the key. If used correctly it can add some top speed or effectively lengthen a stride if you couldn't quite take another stride, say in a race. Flexibility matters with it, if doing any stride starts to challenge your flexibility, you lose speed and power because of muscular restraint on the other side of your activating muscles.

Weight displacement changes as your foot arcs away... Well, not so much as your body must make changes to effectively keep a push 90* from your skates angle. Ideally you'd be kicking straight out sideways from yourself, but since the skate arcs to some degree you have to go with the flow so to speak.

Where the quads vs I lines differ mainly is in the ankles. Inline skate lean is produced more from the knee and hips of a skater than pressures of the foot and ankle movements in quads.

Best way to learn the differences is to skate them regularly at the same sessions a few times for several months. You'll learn to associate each style separately and become a better skater overall. Use sticky skating and go into the deepest possible crossovers. Paying close attention to the way a quad articulates at the ankles vs where an inline would in the knees and hips.

Ice hockey drills on edge control will be your friend for inline transition.

Loads of people will disagree or argue you should completely hang up quads to learn I lines. Its so not true. Thinking of it more like learning a different kicking style, like a roundhouse kick vs a inside-out crescent kick. Either way ya go , if you don't regularly practice one and only practice the other you over specialize and reduce your skills with the unworked skill. Also, your body's ability to adapt goes down. Eventually you should be able to completely differentiate between the subtleties of quad/inline. Its all lateral pushing after all. The differences aren't that much.


In the end just do what works best. If you have to hang one or the other up, maybe its just best for you to do it. But think about Shawn white. He's awesome because he can do a LOT at very similar spots, skateboard/snowboard/surf, though hes known for snowboarding the other 2 skills certainly haven't hurt him
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Old February 6th, 2015, 03:45 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WJCIV View Post
...
Actually, on quads there is a much debated "toe-flick" at the very end of the stride, but the general consensus is that it is not good on inlines.
IMO, the toe flick gives less result than finishing your stroke holding equal weight on toe & heel while pushing out for as long as you can, with good all wheels down pressure and grip, and then quickly into stepping toward your next stroke.

The time wasted on the toe flick, at point in stroke where push force and lateral outward foot velocity are both dropping (not to mention diminished grip), makes for a minimal if any net gain, since the toe flick adds time to the cadence cycle.

Better to skip the toe flick and instead, kick your stroke cadence up a bit, so you can then harvest more energy from the middle of your stroke, where it can give you a lot more than you can gain at the stroke's outward termination point with a toe flick.

The toe flick does, however, move your body mass a little further laterally inward toward the center of the stroke's arc curve, and this centripetal acceleration is the main source of energy gain at higher speeds. So, perhaps the debate still remains inconclusive, and those who know how to work the flick perfectly can make better use of the potential gain of a slightly wider lateral shift of their body mass.

-Armadillo
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Old February 8th, 2015, 12:56 AM   #9
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??? Can't say I have ever noticed that. I too skate a short forward da45. While I do notice that my blades do have a lean forward bias, I don't notice the toe thing. Might have just been those rentals. You tend to find all kinds of weird stuff with rentals. As far as the toe goes, I do not like a full sized toe wheel. Both my blades are set up with a toe rocker. Also when I am skating blades, I tend to be on a hard edge all the time. I love to turn on my da45's, and it is even better on blades.
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Old February 14th, 2015, 07:24 PM   #10
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Thanks for your feedback. During the week I added a set of Roces ( 2nd hand but barely used ) to the stable. I'll see how these feel when they arrive.
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Old February 20th, 2015, 10:42 AM   #11
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Well it looks like it was more an issue with the rentals - the Roces ( with articulated cuff )do not force the strong "front up" feel.
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