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Beginning Skaters Forum This is the place for beginning skaters to ask questions and share their stories. We would love to hear about your experiences learning to skate. No question is too dumb!

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Old January 22nd, 2015, 02:57 AM   #1
Kittywolf13
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Question Feeling frustrated with my new-ness

So I just got back from the rink and I'm feeling frustrated. Last week was my first time on quads and I loved it. While not complelty stable, by the end of the night I was feeling fairly confident. So today I was chomping at the bit to go out there again. We get there, I lace up and we do a few laps but I feel very uneasy on the skates. It felt like the wheel was wobbling in and out. Not from being loose but from being worn out unevenly. So I exchanged the skates. These were better, though I think one had more give then the other for turns and the like. But I kept at it. I was doing fine, able to make sharper turns and then they switched directions. Now this just felt super weird to me and the skates (or me.) seem to try turning in or out on themselves. I ended up falling and scuffing my knees and such decently. (I sound like such a wuss.) this upset me and it was basically the end of our night.

So now I'm feeling frustrated and a little frightened. How do I know if it's me? Or bad skates? (Rentals obviously) what can I do to help me (short of paying for someone to teach me.) I'm afraid now that if I buy my own skates that they might be "too much" skate for me to handle if I can't stay stable on rentals.

I'll add that I don't know how to stop and tried t stopping a few times and for some reason I'm not getting the drag or something right.

Also I'm not sure but there are parts of the rink that are not as smooth as the rest. It's made of wood but the rounded corners of the rink, the wood panels are in a different pattern so when you roll over them you totally can feel the unevenness which makes me stumble a bit.

I just don't get it?? I'm missing something simple and elementary it seems. I understand the motions and sometimes I get going and everything is smooth and good and then the next minute I feel my feet turn either in or out, towards or away from each other and it throws me off. It feels dumb to say but I'm not sure how to control my feet?? Do I need more pressure? I dunno.

So uh help! Maybe someone can help with just text or whatever.
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Old January 22nd, 2015, 05:24 AM   #2
WJCIV
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Rental quality varies quite a bit. It could be a wheel wear problem. It could be a couple of the bearings are "crunchy" (too much grit) or an axle nut is overtightened and slowing down particular wheels. It could be the plate is not aligned properly.

The good news is that when you get your own skates you will get used to any quirks rather than having to readjust each time out. If you get a decent set they should react better than the rentals.

You also need time to build up your stabalizer muscles. There are little muscles in your knees and ankles that aren't worked as much in everyday activity as in skating. As you do more they will build up and you will gain more control. Are you warming up and stretching at all?

I can't tell without seeing your floor if it is uneven. If the roof was ever leaky or you are in a particularly damp area it is certainly possible. Water damage causes wood to warp.
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Old January 22nd, 2015, 05:27 PM   #3
Kittywolf13
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Rental quality varies quite a bit. It could be a wheel wear problem. It could be a couple of the bearings are "crunchy" (too much grit) or an axle nut is overtightened and slowing down particular wheels. It could be the plate is not aligned properly.

The good news is that when you get your own skates you will get used to any quirks rather than having to readjust each time out. If you get a decent set they should react better than the rentals.

You also need time to build up your stabalizer muscles. There are little muscles in your knees and ankles that aren't worked as much in everyday activity as in skating. As you do more they will build up and you will gain more control. Are you warming up and stretching at all?

I can't tell without seeing your floor if it is uneven. If the roof was ever leaky or you are in a particularly damp area it is certainly possible. Water damage causes wood to warp.
Thanks I had an inkling it wasn't complelty my fault that it felt so weird. I couldn't explain it to my husband so he couldn't help too much. I also was unnerved a little cause there were more folks at the rink then last time. So I was nervous.

Well I ordered a pair of skates from someone. They are used but I'm not a 100% sure they will fit. But well see.

This is the rink: http://www.gobamboozles.com

Not sure if that would help you at all to see the floor. Probably not.

Are there any exercises I can do to help those muscles and flexibility. I don't even know how to stop.
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Old January 22nd, 2015, 06:46 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by Kittywolf13 View Post
Thanks I had an inkling it wasn't complelty my fault that it felt so weird. I couldn't explain it to my husband so he couldn't help too much. I also was unnerved a little cause there were more folks at the rink then last time. So I was nervous.

Well I ordered a pair of skates from someone. They are used but I'm not a 100% sure they will fit. But well see.

This is the rink: http://www.gobamboozles.com

Not sure if that would help you at all to see the floor. Probably not.

Are there any exercises I can do to help those muscles and flexibility. I don't even know how to stop.
One would doing one foot squats, any thing that works on one foot balance.

When you get you skates you will need to make sure they are set up right for you.
The big nuts on bottom need to be right.
To tight and the skates will not want to turn, to lose and they will turn when you don't want them to.
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Old January 22nd, 2015, 09:35 PM   #5
Kittywolf13
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One would doing one foot squats, any thing that works on one foot balance.

When you get you skates you will need to make sure they are set up right for you.
The big nuts on bottom need to be right.
To tight and the skates will not want to turn, to lose and they will turn when you don't want them to.
yeah ive been doing squats and stuff at work, since i do a lot of bending and squatting to look things at work. so some times i just stay squatted to see how long i can stay like that. hahaha.

im learning so much from everyone! keep up the good work!
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Old January 22nd, 2015, 09:50 PM   #6
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If you are doing anything more vigorous than a brisk walk you should warmup then stretch to minimize your chances of injury. In this case it isn't as much about increasing flexibility as getting the muscles ready to workout. Do a quick warmup (~3-5 minutes, which at a rink is conveniently the length of one song). Then do the stretches you remember from gym class. Ideally you should do one or two stretches for each major muscle group and hold each one for 15-20 seconds. Remember that you want only a mild discomfort when you stretch - not full on pain. Also note that the ones I linked to are "static" stretches. You push the pose to the point it should be held and hold it. Don't bounce.

On to strength exercises for the ankle and knee. Simply skating will build up the strength in time. Other exercises will do it faster.

One legged squats are great, but I find that without some goal many people don't go down far enough, so I'm going to tell you to touch your knee to your ankle. Start by standing on one foot. Make sure your knees are next to each other and put the other toe on the ground, which will be about a foot behind the weight bearing foot. Don't put any weight on it - it's just for balance. Then squat until you can touch the knee of that second foot to the ankle of the first. When you get really good at this you can do it by holding the second foot in the air without touching the ground. Do a handful on one leg, then switch to the other. If you spend 10 minutes a day you will be surprised how much progress you make.

For the ankles you can spell the alphabet with your toes. While sitting at a desk lift one foot off the ground. Now form each letter in the alphabet as large as you can with your toes without moving the part of the leg between the knee and ankle.

The best combination of strength/balance/stabalizers/flexibility without too much gear is probably yoga. If you can hold a deep eagle pose for any length of time you are likely going to have few problems skating. There are plenty of 20 minute routines on YouTube. Many of them focus specifically on balance, strength, weight loss, etc., but in reality most of them will address all those points to some extent. 20 minutes each morning isn't too onerous, and it will help.

If you are willing to buy kettle bells, resistance bands, hand weights, a balance board, a weighted vest, etc. there are many more exercises you can do. Since you're only worried about fitness I don't think any of them really offer anything more than what you can do with your body weight. They would offer more variety if you get bored.
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Old January 23rd, 2015, 03:20 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by WJCIV View Post
If you are doing anything more vigorous than a brisk walk you should warmup then stretch to minimize your chances of injury. In this case it isn't as much about increasing flexibility as getting the muscles ready to workout. Do a quick warmup (~3-5 minutes, which at a rink is conveniently the length of one song). Then do the stretches you remember from gym class. Ideally you should do one or two stretches for each major muscle group and hold each one for 15-20 seconds. Remember that you want only a mild discomfort when you stretch - not full on pain. Also note that the ones I linked to are "static" stretches. You push the pose to the point it should be held and hold it. Don't bounce.

On to strength exercises for the ankle and knee. Simply skating will build up the strength in time. Other exercises will do it faster.

One legged squats are great, but I find that without some goal many people don't go down far enough, so I'm going to tell you to touch your knee to your ankle. Start by standing on one foot. Make sure your knees are next to each other and put the other toe on the ground, which will be about a foot behind the weight bearing foot. Don't put any weight on it - it's just for balance. Then squat until you can touch the knee of that second foot to the ankle of the first. When you get really good at this you can do it by holding the second foot in the air without touching the ground. Do a handful on one leg, then switch to the other. If you spend 10 minutes a day you will be surprised how much progress you make.

For the ankles you can spell the alphabet with your toes. While sitting at a desk lift one foot off the ground. Now form each letter in the alphabet as large as you can with your toes without moving the part of the leg between the knee and ankle.

The best combination of strength/balance/stabalizers/flexibility without too much gear is probably yoga. If you can hold a deep eagle pose for any length of time you are likely going to have few problems skating. There are plenty of 20 minute routines on YouTube. Many of them focus specifically on balance, strength, weight loss, etc., but in reality most of them will address all those points to some extent. 20 minutes each morning isn't too onerous, and it will help.

If you are willing to buy kettle bells, resistance bands, hand weights, a balance board, a weighted vest, etc. there are many more exercises you can do. Since you're only worried about fitness I don't think any of them really offer anything more than what you can do with your body weight. They would offer more variety if you get bored.
thank you i will try some of those exercises.
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Old January 23rd, 2015, 04:56 AM   #8
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Hi,

Well I won't do my usual since you have so many issues and concerns. I will just do a little and hopefully Slow and W gave you lots.

Rentals are a blast, yet you better know if they are bent or off tracking. Skated them longer, several times a week, than probably anyone. Now that was DUMB since you can buy OK skates in the range of 99$

^ So since you have had a problem on Rentals, we just don't know if it is a real problem or an equipment problem. Knew a guy who bought rentals at .99c a pop from the closing rink days. Never thought he checked them for straightness.

T-Stop: A lot of mis_informtion exists on SLF about T stops on quads. Check out what I have wrote, on Regular and under Derby and sometimes I am nasty to T_Stop not knowers. . https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y6Sxv-sUYtM. T_Stops are great when you know how to modify them to the The Working Point, not Theory

Yours in Skating, MA/NY Skating Dave
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Old January 23rd, 2015, 12:44 PM   #9
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Default Just don't give up

When I first returned to skating, I was Ok, but it took me over an hour each session to really feel I had my skates under me. I would wish for longer sessions. Now my skates are right there everytime.

Music is my cure for frustration. Just imagine what you want to do off skate. And dance it to the music. It will all come together in time if you don't give up.

I finnaly after year or so own a couple of three turns, but I'm still trying on the one footed spins.

My goal upon return was a spining camel. I can camel on either foot forward and backwards now. I can turn sharp, but I'm still a long way from a spinning camel. So, I learn this and that and never give up.

I'm not usually a goal oriented person at all, but, I find it helps in my skating to have short and long term goals. But if I feel frustrated just have fun, that's really what it's all about.

If it doesn't feel quite right for an hour or so, no big deal, it will come in time.

Keep Rolling
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Old January 24th, 2015, 04:16 AM   #10
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so i ended up haveing a lengthy discussion with a member and purchased a pair of used skates. they came in today:

Roller skates! by kittywolf13, on Flickr

Bont Quad Racer, plate: Bonte Ignite NTS and Velocity Race wheels

so now i need to buy some safety gear so when i wipe out again its not as painful... but to be honest im a little terrified of the "upgrade."
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Old January 24th, 2015, 05:02 AM   #11
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Don't worry. You will likely do better with these. And better still, as you go from session to session, you will have a skate that acts in a consistent manner, and not a different feel all of the time.
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Old January 24th, 2015, 01:52 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by rufusprime99 View Post
Don't worry. You will likely do better with these. And better still, as you go from session to session, you will have a skate that acts in a consistent manner, and not a different feel all of the time.
That is what I'm hoping for. That the consistency will make up for some things. :P
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Old January 25th, 2015, 03:18 AM   #13
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Hi Again,

First off the picture looks nice to me. You might notice that the laces are laced to point a certain way for the left skate and the right skate. Since I am OCD kind of on doing the same string up I noticed that right away. SO I took a cheer for the former owner for knowing about lacing. Also the laces and the upper boot looked good, and broken in. I know too much for you now, yet great for me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kittywolf13 View Post
so i ended up haveing a lengthy discussion o - o
so now i need to buy some safety gear so when i wipe out again its not as painful... but to be honest im a little terrified of the "upgrade."
Wrist Guards are a Must for older new skaters that are IFFY
^ The straight arm collapse on the floor will break a wrist
^ You learn the straight up some time late in teens, so it is a risk
Helmets are even higher on priority if you are that kind of faller.
^ Had a Black Grandma I sat next to a Sunday ago and she for sure
^ needed a helmet to protect her. Husband, Son, kids did better yet she was
^ STIFF as all get out. I tried to encourage them to try out ChezVous, or
^ many of our other skate places in Mass. And I did help her to find out how
^ to use the rug to get used to walking/rolling on skates

Add other Safety stuff as you see or even feel A Risk.
OK time for France's full suited roller boy going down a car garage. Sorry can't find the video right now, yet it is here on SLF and Kathie has met him. Talk about fear..
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D8T1Nnmw4hA

NOW for me: I skate with cargo shorts unless I don't. No knee pads, It gives me more knee freedom. I skate with Wrist Guards after my wrist break doing so so little compared to what I do. It is just a protection. I skate OK without them when I forget them yet I do prefer them

Yours in Skating, MA/NY Skating Dave.
Edit-01: Added one clip on our Frenchman Rollerman, Just like other stuff the UK commentator got it wrong about Rollerman. He is or was a good engineering student
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Last edited by MANY_SkatingDave; January 25th, 2015 at 03:25 AM. Reason: Rollerman added
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Old January 25th, 2015, 03:26 AM   #14
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Quote:
Don't worry. You will likely do better with these.
Totally agree with rufusprime99 here.

I came to quad skating from ice skating where I'd been doing entry level freestyle - fairly consistent on all edges, solid waltz jumps, starting one foot spins and back three-turns (though it'd been about two years since I did that consistently). On rental quads, I couldn't even do forward crossovers, and I had the same feeling of the wheels wanting to turn in different directions.

So it was a bit of a leap of faith to go out and spend a bunch of money on nice roller skates.

But it was definitely worth it! Immediately I could do forward crossovers in my "good" direction, plus forward outside and inside edges. Some things, such as spins and three turns, are very different on quads and I still can't do them; other things like spirals seem easier somehow. I won't go into detail on ice/quads differences as that doesn't seem to be your situation, but suffice to say that rentals/own skates differences can be huge.

Are there group skating lessons at your rink? This will give you some more confidence, and basic skills that will be a good groundwork for going on to speed, artistic, derby, hockey or rink skating.
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Old January 26th, 2015, 03:18 AM   #15
Kittywolf13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MANY_SkatingDave View Post
Hi Again,

First off the picture looks nice to me. You might notice that the laces are laced to point a certain way for the left skate and the right skate. Since I am OCD kind of on doing the same string up I noticed that right away. SO I took a cheer for the former owner for knowing about lacing. Also the laces and the upper boot looked good, and broken in. I know too much for you now, yet great for me.



Wrist Guards are a Must for older new skaters that are IFFY
^ The straight arm collapse on the floor will break a wrist
^ You learn the straight up some time late in teens, so it is a risk
Helmets are even higher on priority if you are that kind of faller.
^ Had a Black Grandma I sat next to a Sunday ago and she for sure
^ needed a helmet to protect her. Husband, Son, kids did better yet she was
^ STIFF as all get out. I tried to encourage them to try out ChezVous, or
^ many of our other skate places in Mass. And I did help her to find out how
^ to use the rug to get used to walking/rolling on skates

Add other Safety stuff as you see or even feel A Risk.
OK time for France's full suited roller boy going down a car garage. Sorry can't find the video right now, yet it is here on SLF and Kathie has met him. Talk about fear..
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D8T1Nnmw4hA

NOW for me: I skate with cargo shorts unless I don't. No knee pads, It gives me more knee freedom. I skate with Wrist Guards after my wrist break doing so so little compared to what I do. It is just a protection. I skate OK without them when I forget them yet I do prefer them

Yours in Skating, MA/NY Skating Dave.
Edit-01: Added one clip on our Frenchman Rollerman, Just like other stuff the UK commentator got it wrong about Rollerman. He is or was a good engineering student
Thanks for the info. The only thing I'm missing now is a helmet. Which I figured I could wait till I go out door skating. But I have a hole in my knee at the moment so I find knee pads will be a must for now and yes I've worn wrist guards from day one. I have weak wrists so I don't feel like risking it one bit.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunny_Hop View Post
Totally agree with rufusprime99 here.

I came to quad skating from ice skating where I'd been doing entry level freestyle - fairly consistent on all edges, solid waltz jumps, starting one foot spins and back three-turns (though it'd been about two years since I did that consistently). On rental quads, I couldn't even do forward crossovers, and I had the same feeling of the wheels wanting to turn in different directions.

So it was a bit of a leap of faith to go out and spend a bunch of money on nice roller skates.

But it was definitely worth it! Immediately I could do forward crossovers in my "good" direction, plus forward outside and inside edges. Some things, such as spins and three turns, are very different on quads and I still can't do them; other things like spirals seem easier somehow. I won't go into detail on ice/quads differences as that doesn't seem to be your situation, but suffice to say that rentals/own skates differences can be huge.

Are there group skating lessons at your rink? This will give you some more confidence, and basic skills that will be a good groundwork for going on to speed, artistic, derby, hockey or rink skating.
Yes the rink offers classes. 50 bucks for 4 days/Saturdays, I think 2 hour sessions? I dunno. I have a friend who does derby so I'm hoping she can give me some pointers in the mean time while I decide if I want to do lessons or not. And I should be able to clock in more time now that I have my own skates capable of going outside.
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Old January 26th, 2015, 03:26 AM   #16
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Kittywolf - As for safety gear, I totally agree with MANY_SkatingDave. I wear a helmet and knee, elbow and wrist protection outdoors. I used to not use kneepads outdoors and I whacked my poor knee so much it still hurts six months later (!!). At most I wear wrist guards indoors - I used to wear a helmet indoors too but as I'm doing artistic now, the club doesn't allow it, which I am kind of :/ about. But as you can see, I do need a LOT more protection to feel comfortable outdoors, as there is so much more risk of a fall, and risk that a fall will be serious.

Oh, and make sure your wheels are suitable for outdoor use.

Outdoor skating is a great idea; I do it a lot because it's free and I don't have consistent access to a rink (my skate club meets in a sports hall once a week). Make sure you find somewhere really smooth and flat to start out. Outdoor concrete netball/basketball courts can be great - a lot of parks around me have these, and you don't have to hire or pay to use them. Better to go at a time when people won't want to use them for netball/basketball though.

Good luck! I hope you have fun skating!
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Old January 26th, 2015, 03:34 AM   #17
Kittywolf13
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Kittywolf - As for safety gear, I totally agree with MANY_SkatingDave. I wear a helmet and knee, elbow and wrist protection outdoors. I used to not use kneepads outdoors and I whacked my poor knee so much it still hurts six months later (!!). At most I wear wrist guards indoors - I used to wear a helmet indoors too but as I'm doing artistic now, the club doesn't allow it, which I am kind of :/ about. But as you can see, I do need a LOT more protection to feel comfortable outdoors, as there is so much more risk of a fall, and risk that a fall will be serious.

Oh, and make sure your wheels are suitable for outdoor use.

Outdoor skating is a great idea; I do it a lot because it's free and I don't have consistent access to a rink (my skate club meets in a sports hall once a week). Make sure you find somewhere really smooth and flat to start out. Outdoor concrete netball/basketball courts can be great - a lot of parks around me have these, and you don't have to hire or pay to use them. Better to go at a time when people won't want to use them for netball/basketball though.

Good luck! I hope you have fun skating!
Yeah out door skating is more convient for me. As the rink is 40min away from me. I'll try the basketball courts but their usually full when I get there. And yes gear is a must outside. And at least wrist and knee indoors. At least for now.
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Old January 26th, 2015, 06:26 AM   #18
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I've also been doing more research on helmets and skating, and I think if you're allowed to wear a helmet doing what you're doing (i.e. if you're not doing artistic at a club that bans helmets), it is probably a good idea to. You can definitely hit your head indoors too - I saw this happen several times at ice skating, and also to someone at a roller rink. I am still pondering what to do about artistic skating, as to whether it's worth the risk of skating without a helmet.
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Old January 26th, 2015, 05:11 PM   #19
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I've also been doing more research on helmets and skating, and I think if you're allowed to wear a helmet doing what you're doing (i.e. if you're not doing artistic at a club that bans helmets), it is probably a good idea to. You can definitely hit your head indoors too - I saw this happen several times at ice skating, and also to someone at a roller rink. I am still pondering what to do about artistic skating, as to whether it's worth the risk of skating without a helmet.
Yeah it's probably worth it.
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