S k a t e L o g     F o r u m
Inline Skating and Quad Roller Skating
Forum Hosts: Jessica Wright | Kathie Fry

FOLLOW US: Our Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Email    


Home - Forum Index - Africa Skating - Asia Skating - Europe Skating - Oceania Skating - Pan America Skating - Roller_Rinks - Friend the SkateLog Forum in Facebook - SkateLog Forum on Facebook

Forum Administrators: Jessica Wright and Kathie Fry | Email Us
Access code for buying and selling subforums: "skates"
How To Get a User Account and Posting Privileges in the SkateLog Forum
Use Google to Search the SkateLog Forum

Go Back   SkateLog Forum > Special Interest Skating Forums (sorted by number of posts) > Speed Skating Forum
FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Speed Skating Forum Most of the discussions in this forum will be about inline speed skating but discussions about ice speed skating and quad roller speed skating are also welcome.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old September 21st, 2018, 12:15 AM   #1
ese002
Senior Member
 
ese002's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Mountain View, CA
Posts: 425
Default Do 13.2 inch 3x125 frames actually exist?

I'm partial to 13.2 for the stability but also for personal tradition. Every speed frame I've ever owned has been 13.2. As one with long legs and big feet, it always seemed like the right plan.

But I'm having trouble finding a long frame in 3x125. Clearly, there are fewer manufacturers participating in this generation. Cado Motus has a 13.0 frame but then their online shop shows "out of stock". No one else seems to have it either. I haven't found another manufacturer that claims to make a frame longer than 13.0 inches.

The trend seems to be toward frames even shorter than 12.8. This is somewhat surprising. I would have thought the greater deck height would have people clamoring for more stability.

Last edited by ese002; September 21st, 2018 at 12:30 AM. Reason: Cado Motus offering correction
ese002 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 21st, 2018, 03:18 AM   #2
bjvircks
Major Trouble
 
bjvircks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Iowa
Posts: 1,736
Default

CM has their 13.2 4X110 / 3x125 Comp tr-5 "transformer" frame. I own 2 sets. (might sell a set). It allows me to quickly and easily swap back and forth between 110 and 125 wheels without swapping frames.
__________________
Quando omni flunkus, moritati
bjvircks is online now   Reply With Quote
Old September 22nd, 2018, 01:00 AM   #3
NDSconcept
Senior Member
 
NDSconcept's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 114
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ese002 View Post
I'm partial to 13.2 for the stability but also for personal tradition. Every speed frame I've ever owned has been 13.2. As one with long legs and big feet, it always seemed like the right plan.

But I'm having trouble finding a long frame in 3x125. Clearly, there are fewer manufacturers participating in this generation. Cado Motus has a 13.0 frame but then their online shop shows "out of stock". No one else seems to have it either. I haven't found another manufacturer that claims to make a frame longer than 13.0 inches.

The trend seems to be toward frames even shorter than 12.8. This is somewhat surprising. I would have thought the greater deck height would have people clamoring for more stability.

3wheel The shorter frame length is to fit the entire length of the wheel.

Overall length of 110x4 frames. (Including wheels.)
336 mm + 110 mm = 446 mm
125x3 frame full length. (Including wheels.)
320mm + 125mm = 445mm

This is to produce a short frame to avoid the risk of wheel interference on both feet when the foot crosses while driving.

However, a person's body reacts to the frame length.
You will feel stability at the landing point location point of the frame length.
It is due to habit and seems to be related to the body reaction.
I'm not an ergonomist, so I'm not sure.
This is data that I collected and analyzed past data.

84x5 Frame length: 340mm or 344mm
84x5 Overall Length: 424mm or 428mm (including wheel)

Below is the proper frame length according to foot size.
The chart below is not guaranteed to be accurate.
However, I think it is generally applicable.




You can find long-length frames.
However, it is difficult to find the frame that keeps the function you want.
We have produced frames that maximize user satisfaction.
Please refer to the photograph below.
https://www.facebook.com/NDSconcept?ref=hl



__________________
please understand, English even poor.
NDSconcept is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 22nd, 2018, 02:21 AM   #4
chuckboucher
is skating again. WOOT!
 
chuckboucher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: South Central, MA
Posts: 2,808
Default

I used to have an EO 13.2 3x125mm frame.
__________________
Inline: Simmons Full Custom(2) | LSR Vanquish 4x110mm/EO 3x125mm | TLTF/MPC/Atom | NMB
Outdoor Quad: Bont Carbon Hybrid | Snyder Advantage | Atom Road Hog | Bones Swiss
Indoor Quad: Reidell 911 | Roll-Line Mistral | Corey Super Enforcers | Bones Swiss
chuckboucher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 23rd, 2018, 02:14 AM   #5
MachV
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Houston, Tx.
Posts: 1,184
Default

There is a 13.4 EO 125 frame for sale on Inline Rewind right now.
__________________
Leroy

There's equipment for everybody, but not all equipment is for every BODY.
MachV is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 29th, 2018, 01:00 AM   #6
ese002
Senior Member
 
ese002's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Mountain View, CA
Posts: 425
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by NDSconcept View Post
3wheel The shorter frame length is to fit the entire length of the wheel.

Overall length of 110x4 frames. (Including wheels.)
336 mm + 110 mm = 446 mm
125x3 frame full length. (Including wheels.)
320mm + 125mm = 445mm

This is to produce a short frame to avoid the risk of wheel interference on both feet when the foot crosses while driving.

However, a person's body reacts to the frame length.
You will feel stability at the landing point location point of the frame length.
It is due to habit and seems to be related to the body reaction.
I'm not an ergonomist, so I'm not sure.
This is data that I collected and analyzed past data.

84x5 Frame length: 340mm or 344mm
84x5 Overall Length: 424mm or 428mm (including wheel)

Below is the proper frame length according to foot size.
The chart below is not guaranteed to be accurate.
However, I think it is generally applicable.




You can find long-length frames.
However, it is difficult to find the frame that keeps the function you want.
We have produced frames that maximize user satisfaction.
Please refer to the photograph below.
https://www.facebook.com/NDSconcept?ref=hl



Interesting that even your largest prototypes have an optimal foot size significantly smaller than my 13US. It suggests that I'm on the right track in seeking longer frames.
ese002 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 29th, 2018, 02:50 AM   #7
bjvircks
Major Trouble
 
bjvircks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Iowa
Posts: 1,736
Default

I've long held the belief that leg length (hip-joint to floor) is more relevant to frame length than foot size. There is typically a loose coorelation between leg length and foot size, and so using foot size works a lot of the time.... but not always. A somewhat comical example would be frame length selection for a Hobbit (from Lord of the Rings books/movies). Hobbits are very short, but have very large feet.
__________________
Quando omni flunkus, moritati
bjvircks is online now   Reply With Quote
Old September 29th, 2018, 03:57 AM   #8
NDSconcept
Senior Member
 
NDSconcept's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 114
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ese002 View Post
Interesting that even your largest prototypes have an optimal foot size significantly smaller than my 13US. It suggests that I'm on the right track in seeking longer frames.

In the past, the size of the boots from 250mm~260mm, "Golden Size" was called.
I do not know why, but I know that many inline players have the size of their feet in the past gold medal.
It is assumed that the current frame length is the most appropriate in 250mm~260mm foot size.
Past frame length = 340 mm.

In fact, we saw that players over 275mm had considerable difficulty in frame size.
We have experience managing elite athletes equipment.


The relationship between foot size and frame length is to find the optimal point in the stable sense that the user is passing from the foot to the body at the landing point.

We are establishing a hypothetical theory that occurs at the optimal landing point.
I'm not sure yet, but the current trend is a possible theory.
__________________
please understand, English even poor.
NDSconcept is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 29th, 2018, 03:58 AM   #9
NDSconcept
Senior Member
 
NDSconcept's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 114
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bjvircks View Post
I've long held the belief that leg length (hip-joint to floor) is more relevant to frame length than foot size. There is typically a loose coorelation between leg length and foot size, and so using foot size works a lot of the time.... but not always. A somewhat comical example would be frame length selection for a Hobbit (from Lord of the Rings books/movies). Hobbits are very short, but have very large feet.

This is not a formal provision.
It is generally available.
It applies under normal body conditions, not abnormal conditions.
Is the Hobbit normal?
Normalizing abnormal logic creates an error.

I also think that you can get better results by cross-comparing this content with other criteria.
__________________
please understand, English even poor.
NDSconcept is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 29th, 2018, 04:58 AM   #10
bjvircks
Major Trouble
 
bjvircks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Iowa
Posts: 1,736
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by NDSconcept View Post
Is the Hobbit normal?
Normalizing abnormal logic creates an error.
oh, come on...

the "hobbit" was intended to be a humorous over exaggeration for the purpose of visualization, not a realistic example. All body proportions (and specifically, foot size relative to leg length) vary within certain norms and are different between men and women and age and growth spurts in young skaters. To a certain extent we are all the same... and yet all different.

I've dealt with ice long track clap setups (really long blades), short track blades and road inlines.
__________________
Quando omni flunkus, moritati
bjvircks is online now   Reply With Quote
Old September 29th, 2018, 10:36 AM   #11
NDSconcept
Senior Member
 
NDSconcept's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 114
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bjvircks View Post
oh, come on...

the "hobbit" was intended to be a humorous over exaggeration for the purpose of visualization, not a realistic example. All body proportions (and specifically, foot size relative to leg length) vary within certain norms and are different between men and women and age and growth spurts in young skaters. To a certain extent we are all the same... and yet all different.

I've dealt with ice long track clap setups (really long blades), short track blades and road inlines.

We are looking for the best conditions for adjusting inline frames.
As Ice skates vary in blade length depending on their foot size, I think the inline frame is similar.
However, if the foot size is too large, I can not increase the frame length indefinitely because of physical loss.
__________________
please understand, English even poor.
NDSconcept is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 30th, 2018, 06:26 AM   #12
ese002
Senior Member
 
ese002's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Mountain View, CA
Posts: 425
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bjvircks View Post
I've long held the belief that leg length (hip-joint to floor) is more relevant to frame length than foot size. There is typically a loose coorelation between leg length and foot size, and so using foot size works a lot of the time.... but not always. A somewhat comical example would be frame length selection for a Hobbit (from Lord of the Rings books/movies). Hobbits are very short, but have very large feet.
Two different factors.

Hip to floor would seem to govern clearance for crossovers and similar. Clearance limits the maximum frame length. Shorter is always better for clearance until the whole frame and wheels fit under the foot where it ceases to matter.

Stability is more about contact points in front and behind the foot. Longer is always better for stability but eventually you run up against the clearance problem.

In my case, I have long legs and big feet. With a 36" inseam, clearance is not an issue for any commercially available speed frame short of fringe offerings like the Armageddon. Maybe not even then. I've never skated on an Armageddon. But the current trend toward 125mm frames significantly shorter than my feet gives me pause.
ese002 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 03:39 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.