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Artistic Skating Forum Discussions about any topic related to artistic roller skating including quad artistic skating, inline figure skating, pairs, dance, synchronized skating, and show skating.

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Old July 18th, 2018, 10:04 PM   #1
maggieminor3
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Default New here and questions about skates

Hello! I'm Maggie and I currently am a grad student in Alabama. I have been reading a lot of the threads lately on this page but have not found all the answers to all the questions I have about skates. The current pair of skates I'm skating in I ordered from the internet and I believe they are a size too big but they get the job done. In the fall I'm hoping to get new skates. I'm really trying to do my research this time. Theres no clubs or rinks around me that know anything about artistic skating that I know of. I'm currently skating in a riedell 120 boot on a reactor neo plate. I'm still just doing single jumps but I want to improve (although I'm mostly teaching myself everything). Any advice on what to get and where to shop in the future? I want something better than what I'm currently skating and I want it to fit better which is one of the biggest motivators for upgrading.
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Old July 19th, 2018, 10:19 AM   #2
rwsz
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Originally Posted by maggieminor3 View Post
Hello! I'm Maggie and I currently am a grad student in Alabama. I have been reading a lot of the threads lately on this page but have not found all the answers to all the questions I have about skates. The current pair of skates I'm skating in I ordered from the internet and I believe they are a size too big but they get the job done. In the fall I'm hoping to get new skates. I'm really trying to do my research this time. Theres no clubs or rinks around me that know anything about artistic skating that I know of. I'm currently skating in a riedell 120 boot on a reactor neo plate. I'm still just doing single jumps but I want to improve (although I'm mostly teaching myself everything). Any advice on what to get and where to shop in the future? I want something better than what I'm currently skating and I want it to fit better which is one of the biggest motivators for upgrading.
maybe a rink can help you get the equipment or u can get online with research at a few different places. skates usa have very expensive but good art skates.
a nice plate would be a mid line rolline plate with a toe stop. 120 Riedell is ok or move up to a 220 or a 297 which is a softer boot, 220 better if u want more support. good luck,,,,u are talking at least 600 to 700 for those. get bones swiss bearings also. wheels depend on you and surface u skate on.
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Old July 20th, 2018, 12:30 PM   #3
markwphoto
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Hi Maggie and Welcome!

Boots

I've skated on a few boots over my years of skating. I started with a Riedell which was a 120. It was a horrible boot but it was given to me for free. Fortunately I wasn't in it very long.

I then went to several Risport boots which were the Diamonte and Super Cristallo. They were great boots but I started to get quite a bit of cramping in the toe box of my Diamonte boots. I had these boots since around 1995 and they were still in great condition after I started skating again 3 years ago (had about a 12 year break from skating). I started to get more demanding with double jumps and spins and I felt all kinds of pressure that was causing more pain off skates.

The two Super Cristallo boots I have are used for my figure skates and the other for a pair of artistic inlines. My figure skates still look new and feel great on my feet. I don't skate as much in my inlines at the moment but I know they will need to be replaced if I decide to compete in them again.

Last year at Nationals I got fitted for an Edea Fly. They were sold by US Skates. They are a bit pricey boot but OMG they are the best feeling, most comfortable skate boots I've ever worn! It's like wearing a comfortable pair of tennis shoes and they fit like a glove. They give you all the stiff support needed for jumps and spins.

My wife also got fitted for Edea Suano boots. She uses these boots for figures. It was great getting the boots custom fits because my wife does have a wide foot and they were able to heat mold and stretch the boot exactly to her foot. More on this later! When we go back to Nationals again this year she plans on getting dance boots, probably the Edea Classica.

Now my wife also has a Riedell 120 for dance at the moment that she got when she first started skating. She hates them after skating in the Edeas. My wife and I have almost the same size foot and I've worn both her new skates and old Reidells. What I don't like about the Reidell is they have a slightly lower heel than the Edeas and they flex too much for me. This is the issue I had with my Reidells when I first started skating.

I can say from now on any boot I buy from here forward will be Edeas. They offer some key things that are different than other boots I've worn. The soles are shorter in height and wider allowing more edge control. The boots mount flat to plates. Other boots tend to curl up towards the toe and this leaves a gap between the boot and plate. The boot mounting is super simple and strong. They have a short break-in time. I could go on with more but that's a lot to chew on already.

Plates and Wheels

There's no question that the Roll-Line plates are the way to go right now. I started skating with Atlas plates. They're big, heavy and clunky. I gave my old Atlas plate to my wife to use on her dance boot for now. She will be getting a Roll-line plate for her new dance boots next week. I switched to Roll-Line Mistrals on my freestyle skates last year and I haven't looked back since. The plate has a much quicker response for edge changes than my Atlas plates and they feel so lightweight (that combined with a lighter boot. I plan to get a Roll-Line Giotto Figure plate next week. I'm currently using an Atlas figure plate on my current setup.

The Variant M would be a great start for getting intro freestyle. It's not too expensive and works well.

The Mariner Cup is a step up from the Variant M but adds click action adjustment for the trucks.

Now the Variant plates and Mariner have just about the exact same plate design and the only difference is the click action setup adjustments on the Mariner Cup.

After the Mariner Cup you start getting to the mid and upper tier freestyle plates.

The design of the Mistral, Energy and Energy steel is exactly the same the big difference is the weight and material of the plates/hardware.

The Mistral is a great middle of the road plate and the one I'm using. While it is heavier than the Energy and Energy Steel, it's still way lighter than my Atlas plates used to be. I didn't feel the need to go to the Energy plates just for a little bit of weight savings. They have help up well for my double jumps, spins, and falls.

The top tier plates are the Matrix, Matrix Steel and EVO. If you must have the best than these are the ones to go with!

Personally I think the Variant M, Mariner Cup or Mistrals are really the most that beginner to intermediate skaters need. Unless your working on triples and quads you should be find with these.

I've pretty much been on Roll-line wheels for over 20 years for my freestyle skates. Mustangs seem to be the go to for most freestyle skater. I use a mix of Mustangs and Leopards. The Mustangs provide more grip while the Leopards are used for sliding making it easier on spins. I keep a Leopards on my Right, outer back wheel and Left, outer forward and inner back wheel. This allows me to spin my spins faster but still have the grip of the Mustangs for jumps and general skating.

The only other wheels I've used are Star HD80s and they're on my figure skates. I've played with the Giottos figure wheel from my wife's skates and I love the way the slide but not sure about the grip for take offs.

If you're doing freestyle then the Mustangs are usually recommend to start with.

A note on bearings. They can go expensive to cheap. For years I have only used Bones Reds. They give me more than enough roll to complete two figure circles on one push and keeps me fast enough for freestyle as well. I personally don't see the need for expensive ceramics when Reds have been good for me for many many years.


I would highly recommend US Skates for getting your equipment and service if you want to go with Edea and Roll-line. They are not necessarily the cheapest on the net but they have taken care of us. Now my wife and I both had custom fittings at Nationals and it was an awesome experience. We both had custom heat molding for our boots to make sure they fit perfectly. I know getting a custom fit may not be an option for your unless you drive to their location in Indiana but they do have some other options for a good fit as well. You can take a tracing of your foot and send it to them and they can recommend the size of boot and other options for you.

You can also order everything yourself; boots, plates wheels, etc and mount it all yourself if you want to save a buck or two. After you get your boot you can heat mold it yourself with a high power hair driver. Don't use a heat gun as they get too hot. Mounting skates is not that hard but it does take time ang patience. I've mounted my wife's skates as well as mine for the past 3 years and so far nothing has fallen off. :-D.

I know this is a long post but hopefully this will give you some ideas of how to proceed. Any other questions feel free to ask!
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Old July 21st, 2018, 05:37 PM   #4
larryoracing
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Smile Welcome Maggie!

I think everybody has given you some really good advice. Good luck on your graduate work. I completed my MBA program a few years back..lol.

I don't know much about your current skates, but I did look up the Neo Reactor Plate. It don't look like a bad plate and it seems to get the job done for you. The boots seem a little bit soft. And what I mean by that most people want a "little" stiffer boot after they get better on their skates.

Personally I think you would like a Roll Line Energy Plate and a Reidell 297 boots. It's important that the boots fit perfectly and the plates are the right size (length of plate) for the boots you are mounting to them. So, go to a professional for sizing your boots. Also you can have the boots custom made for each foot for an extra 200 dollars from Reidell. That is the ultimate to have custom made boots for each foot. I truly recommend that.

Are my boots custom made? No. I once had custom boots made and they lasted my whole career skating which was about 10 years when I was a child. Recently I have gone through thousands of dollars in buying boots and came across one brand...Berry, that fit me perfectly. As far as I know Berry Boots do not make custom boots for each foot, but their standard size, made for wide feet, fits me perfectly.

I have lots of other boots that don't fit me well and they are just lying around the house not being used. So I don't have custom made boots for each foot, My Berry Boots fit me perfectly and they are their standard boots off the shelf.

Berry boots off the shelf are made wider to fit American feet and Argentinian feet (Berry boots are made in Argentina) . I have one pair (2 eyelet) boots for dance and a stiffer pair (3 eyelet) pair for figures.

I have a pair of Energy Plates that I use for freestyle, but I have not been jumping and spinning on them for about a year now. On those Energy plates are mounted a pair of EDEA Concerto boots. Those boots are really stiff and I don't recommend them for Beginners.

Most people seem to like, own and skate on the Reidell 297 boots. They are a happy medium boot that most people like and wear and buy ...lol!. So, you can't go wrong buying a pair of Reidell 297 boots. The Reidell Boots 297 seem to be a lot softer than the EDEA Concerto Boots. I have never skated on a Reidell 297 boot. I have skated on a Rediell Gold Star custom boots for about 10 years as a youth. My first and only pair of boots that I owned and skated on for about 10 years as a youth....13- 25 years age.


I have also skated on a pair of Roll Line Giotto plates, which are the same plate as the Energy, but they don't have a toe stop mounting. Which makes them cheaper at about 300 dollars for just the plates. That's a great deal if you can skate without a toe stop? They are a fine plate with a "nominal" truck geometry, which make them really easy to skate on and not too reactive. They are a precise reacting plate and easy to skate on.

That's what I like about the Roll Line Energy plate and the Roll Line Ghiotto Plate. Real "nominal" skating truck geometries that makes you stand up, have full control of your skates and they skate where you point them/skate on them, they go easily and predictably. That's why I recommend them so much.

So, here's the clincher. What plates do I skate on???? For Dance I skate on the Roll Line "Dance" Plate and for Figures I skate on the Roll Line "Ring" plate, which they don't make anymore. The Roll Line "Spin" plate may be the same plate/skate, but I don't know that and have never skated on the Roll Line "Spin" plate.

1) What do I like about the Roll Line "Dance" plate. You barely press on the edge/plate and the skate turns on a dime. Most beginners cannot skate on a plate that turns so easily. That's why I suggest the Energy plate for most people. The Energy is a lot less reactive. You really don't want to jump and spin on a Roll Line Dance plate, but you can. Be careful...lol!

2) For Figures (skating around those black circles painted on the Skating Floor) I skate on/use a Roll Line "Ring" plate. They don't make that plate anymore. It looks just like the Roll Line "Dance" Plate but the truck geometry is less making the "Ring" plate less reactive and more amenable to doing figures. Most people use the Roll Line "Ring" plate to do loops, those really small circles painted on the Skating Floor, but I like the action, it may be too much for doing simple figures on the bigger Black circles painted on the skating floor, but that is what I'm skating on for now doing figures. ...lol.

3) Bearings. I use the Bones Ceramic Bearings. They are about 250 dollars per set. I use those on my Dance skates and my figure Skates. On my Energy, Freestyle skates I use the Regular Bones Bearings that cost about 100 dollars per set. I would recommend the Standard Bones Bearings that cost about 100 dollars per set. You can't go wrong.

4) Wheels, I have been using the Roll Line "ICE" Dance wheels, hardness 90A -97A. For Figures I have been using the Komplex Figures wheels. Yellow/the hardest wheel and for the push wheel the Softest/green wheel.

On my Energy Freestyle skates I use the Roll Line smaller diameter 57mm diameter and hardness 97A

a) So ,for you as a beginner I would recommend the Roll Line "Ice" Dance wheel, 63mm diameter and hardness 95A. That's just a guess. I don't think you would mind those wheels and you may even like them...lol! There are some really good skaters who run that wheel. Roll Line Dance Wheels Roll Line "Ice" Dance wheel, 95A.

b) My Dance skates have a weird combination of wheels on them. Roll Line "Ice: Dance 97A on the outside wheels. Roll Line "Ice" Dance wheel 95A for the inside back wheel and the Roll Line "Ice" Dance wheel, 90A for the inside front push wheel.

I came upon that combination, because the harder wheels 97A tend to flat spot when you drag them on the floor to stop. So I put the hardest wheels on the outside of the skate. The softest Wheels 90A on the inside front, so to resist flatting when stopping/dragging the inside wheel to stop and the 95A on the inside back as a happy medium.


Good Luck,

Larry O
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