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Quad Roller Skating Forum Discussions about quad roller skates and any other quad skating discussions that do not seem appropriate for one of our other forums.

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Old October 14th, 2017, 01:19 AM   #1
FLHANDSTER
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Default Newbie With Questions

My wife and I are looking to possibly get back into Quad Skating some 30 years later.

We have lots of questions such as the following:

1.) With our primary application being outdoors, which QUAD skates would you recommend that would serve us well, yet not require a 2nd mortgage on the house?

2.) Low cuts or the boot version? Your perspective and opinion on going with either of them?

3.) What size and durometer of wheel would you suggest for best results?

4.) Any unique gear recommendations?

5.) Any great dealers that have the best prices and service?


Please stop by with your thoughts ASAP.

Thank you for your time and willingness to share here.
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Old October 14th, 2017, 01:28 AM   #2
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Originally Posted by FLHANDSTER View Post
My wife and I are looking to possibly get back into Quad Skating some 30 years later.

We have lots of questions such as the following:

1.) With our primary application being outdoors, which QUAD skates would you recommend that would serve us well, yet not require a 2nd mortgage on the house?

2.) Low cuts or the boot version? Your perspective and opinion on going with either of them?

3.) What size and durometer of wheel would you suggest for best results?

4.) Any unique gear recommendations?

5.) Any great dealers that have the best prices and service?


Please stop by with your thoughts ASAP.

Thank you for your time and willingness to share here.
IF you are serious about outdoors and haven't skated in that long of a time, now is the time to move to inline. OUTDOORS, inline are your best friend.
However there are some outdoor quad skaters here that can clue you in on quads. YOu probably will end up spending about $250 a pair to have solid well working out door quads. Don't worry so much about bearings like some do, $30 bearings are just fine. There will be good recommendations on outdoor wheels. Wheels on outdoors quads are very important. Metal plates on your skates, not plastic. Lots of low cost plates out there that will get it done.
I skate low boots, changed over years ago and never looked back. They are lighter and since you are starting again, no sense in carrying the extra weight. You will adjust as you start over.
Plates, SG Competitors or something along that line. Strong, easy to work with and inexpensive. Can make small changes along the way to make them better. Cushion changes, kingpin changes and you are pretty much done. Boots are tough, hard to test boots. When I find good fitting boots, I buy several pairs.
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Old October 14th, 2017, 04:25 AM   #3
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3) I would go Atom Road Hogs (fairly inexpensive and great for outdoors)

4) My recommendation would probably be SureGrip Avanti plates (again fairly inexpensive and alloy plates and sturdy)
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Old October 14th, 2017, 11:51 AM   #4
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If there is an indoor rink around, I would suggest trying some indoor skating first. Wrist guards are a must, and you might go ahead and get knee and elbow pads. This would just be a way of getting your feet under you. Outdoor skating WILL be harder and more taxing on the body.

If you are set on outdoor skating, as fierocious1 said, inlines should be considered, as they do better outdoors. Larger thinner wheels go over crack and small debris much easier. Full safety gear, and perhaps a helmet should always be used outdoors.

If you still want quads, Quadline skates might be a consideration. Look them up. They use the taller inline wheels. Good for outdoors.

You could also build some outdoor quads. The price here can vary from a little more expensive than a lowish priced package skate and up. The one reason you would buy parts and put it together is to change the plate length. The front axle of a quad is usually just in front of the ball of the foot. FOr an indoor art skate, it is under the ball of the foot. But for outdoors, you might want a longer plate, with the front axle more forward. This will help mitigate falling forward too easily if you hit a small rock or crack.

So, there are some options.

Oh, and these are kind of interesting:
https://www.cardiffskate.com/product...RoCzpEQAvD_BwE

For the price, pretty low in skate terms, you could just jump into these and see how you do.
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Old October 14th, 2017, 02:03 PM   #5
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The question is, what type of skating will you be doing?
If you want speed get a bicycle, if you want to skate and dance and get exercise, great, the exact same skate can go indoors or outdoors, just change wheels, Iíll never understand why people pay to skate indoors, terrible music, bad air and you pay for it?

Grab some bones(wheels) if you arenít sure of your ability, to start, get some smaller wheels 59mm, normal skate wheels size is 62mm, lots of outdoor wheels are 64-65 and 70mm, the 70mm are for racing, if you want to go fast get on a bicycle.
78-82 durometer is good outdoors, used outdoor wheels arenít such a good idea, they tend to wear out faster, indoor wheels are 90ish to 101ish in durometer, used indoor wheels are a good idea, they donít wear as fast and saving money going used is always good.
A used leather boot, even a high boot is great, quality leather lasts, if you get a high boot you donít have to lace all the way up, just lace to the top of the foot leaving the ankle free to flex. Check eBay, it may take one or two tries to get a good size fit, and the boots will come with plates, and the chances are the plates will simply need new cushions and work like new.
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Old October 15th, 2017, 12:10 AM   #6
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Default I remmember bieing newby at 12 yr old

I went to a rink and was frustrated that i could'nt skate and felt like i was thrown off the deep end.
I would probably do it different and have got a pair cheapies for outside and done an ellen page {laps around the court}.
Yeah the rink is smoother and you have a grab rail but thee days you have so much safety gear available that we didnt have in "76"
Maybe once your confident go to the rink a few times and then buy a pair of rink skates and do outdoor and indoor.
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Old October 15th, 2017, 06:14 PM   #7
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IF you are serious about outdoors and haven't skated in that long of a time, now is the time to move to inline. OUTDOORS, inline are your best friend. However there are some outdoor quad skaters here that can clue you in on quads.
I am about to do BOTH! I hope.

Started on quads only for 25 years, then inlines exclusively for 25 years. Just building up a new pair of quads. Here is why:

I LOVE my inline skates for outdoors EXCEPT when the bike paths are WET. It takes some serious skill to skate inlines on wet surface - skills I have - but very very unnerving. Too small a contact patch with inline wheels, and when you lose your "edge", even for a second, you are down.

My longboards (like a giant skateboard) work GREAT on wet surfaces with those big "quad-shaped" wheels. I can't hardly make my boards slide out, even trying. So I got the idea to try quads again since I don't always feel like using my boards. I hate missing skate sessions just because morning fog or last night's rain dampened my skate surfaces.

Can I switch back and forth between inlines and quads? Give me two weeks to find that out. But if I planned on skating outdoors on sunny, dry days only - inlines hands down. I have also skated rinks with inlines but do prefer quads indoors.

Last thing: If you folks consider yourselves to be "expert" skaters back then on quads, maybe you don't feel like going through another learning curve for inlines. And if your outdoor surfaces are smooth and kept clean, it's a toss up. If you plan to skate out in the real world on nice weather days - inlines.

Cheers!
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Old October 16th, 2017, 03:02 AM   #8
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I am about to do BOTH! I hope.

Started on quads only for 25 years, then inlines exclusively for 25 years. Just building up a new pair of quads. Here is why:

I LOVE my inline skates for outdoors EXCEPT when the bike paths are WET. It takes some serious skill to skate inlines on wet surface - skills I have - but very very unnerving. Too small a contact patch with inline wheels, and when you lose your "edge", even for a second, you are down.

My longboards (like a giant skateboard) work GREAT on wet surfaces with those big "quad-shaped" wheels. I can't hardly make my boards slide out, even trying. So I got the idea to try quads again since I don't always feel like using my boards. I hate missing skate sessions just because morning fog or last night's rain dampened my skate surfaces.

Can I switch back and forth between inlines and quads? Give me two weeks to find that out. But if I planned on skating outdoors on sunny, dry days only - inlines hands down. I have also skated rinks with inlines but do prefer quads indoors.

Last thing: If you folks consider yourselves to be "expert" skaters back then on quads, maybe you don't feel like going through another learning curve for inlines. And if your outdoor surfaces are smooth and kept clean, it's a toss up. If you plan to skate out in the real world on nice weather days - inlines.

Cheers!
Some people can do both. I tried. I actually took apart my quads and skated 2 years on inlines and tried to break old quad habits. I could make decent speed but I felt trapped when coming up on traffic and when in panic mode would go back to quad moves. Dangerous! Had a bad collision with a wrong way skater. Then had some knee problems come up, so I built a new set from some parts of quads and came back. After about 6 months, no knee problems. I did hurt my ankle during that time and so it gave me time to finally machine my new skate frames from scratch instead of modifying quad skate plates. I just could not do both well. After coming back to quad I had some inline habits to ditch, still crops up from time to time. Glad you can do it, I just am set in my ways LOL
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Old October 16th, 2017, 05:01 AM   #9
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Some people can do both. I tried. I actually took apart my quads and skated 2 years on inlines and tried to break old quad habits. I could make decent speed but I felt trapped when coming up on traffic and when in panic mode would go back to quad moves. Dangerous! Had a bad collision with a wrong way skater. Then had some knee problems come up, so I built a new set from some parts of quads and came back. After about 6 months, no knee problems. I did hurt my ankle during that time and so it gave me time to finally machine my new skate frames from scratch instead of modifying quad skate plates. I just could not do both well. After coming back to quad I had some inline habits to ditch, still crops up from time to time. Glad you can do it, I just am set in my ways LOL
I mainly get two problems switching back and forth. When going from inline to quad, not having so much fore/aft stability is an eye opener. It takes a few laps to get used the the short quad wheelbase. Also on inlines, I am more free to lean left, be it forward or backward. This bites me in the azz because my left ankle can't lean left. So I go back to quads, forget, and lean hard left. OUCH. My ankle does not like that. I don't get the knee problems as for some reason, I really use my whole body well with the inlines, which is what you need to do.
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Old October 16th, 2017, 05:04 AM   #10
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Some people can do both. Glad you can do it...
I don't know yet. I never tried to skate on quads one day and inlines the next. Or a week on one and a month on the other. For one thing, I have a mean hockey-stop on inlines. If I revert to that on quads on concrete I'm gonna die. Inlines are not as likely to tip me over my rear wheel onto my keester, or pitch me forward for a face plant.

Also, inlines are dangerous around longitudinal cracks in the surface where quads are trouble around latitudinal cracks. I manage to translate all of that info seamlessly from skateboards to inlines, so I have high hopes I can switch back and forth at will quads to inlines. But Dude.....we just don't know.

I skated quads exclusively for 25 years. Switched to inlines and never even ONCE got back on quads for 25 more years until tonight in my house. Time will tell. But I do know two people who can do both well.
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Old October 16th, 2017, 05:45 PM   #11
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...When going from inline to quad, not having so much fore/aft stability is an eye opener....
^^My biggest concern. Knowing full well that I am going to bounce my arse down the road sooner than later is disconcerting.
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Old October 17th, 2017, 06:08 AM   #12
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Default For outdoors? I LOVE my quadlines!

I can't really comment on inline skates because I've only ever been on a crappy pair of rentals once on challenge I was issued.
Alot of those wheel advantages mentioned in this thread are TOTALLY valid. I like my quadlines outdoors for several reasons:
1) the wheels are 82a duro which is quite a bit softer than what I roll on my indoor quads. This allows me to roll over pebbles and other debris without getting jammed to a stop like I would on my skateboard.
2) the point mentioned above about the narrowness of the wheels ~ 22mm in my case, less resistance from all the odd surfaces; varying degrees of quality of those surfaces, concrete, asphalt, and even grass for short durations between pavements.
3) Diameter of wheels; in my case I'm using 100mm. Large wheels take longer to get going but keep rolling longer with less effort once you've got a speed you like. So, I also get a certain stability with this wider diameter which allows me to try out new *tricks* outdoors before I go back to rink skating. The quadlines are just way more forgiving!

So I use mine for traveling to my sister's house and back, about a 2 mile round trip, I skate bike trails where I really get my exercise on and can get moving at a decent clip and finally, I mess around in nearby parking lots (usually at night) when I'm trying out new stuff. Love-love-love brand new smooth asphalt the best with these. If you scroll almost to the bottom of this page:
http://skatelogforum.com/forums/show...p?t=83&page=76
you can see my setup I'm currently using.
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Old October 17th, 2017, 06:22 PM   #13
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^^My biggest concern. Knowing full well that I am going to bounce my arse down the road sooner than later is disconcerting.
Funny, when I swap, from inline to quad, I immediately start skating backwards. The method to this madness is, I naturally straddle a lot when going backwards which is a lot more stable for a quad. When I am looking over my right shoulder, I will typically have my right foot pushed way back, to open my hips and shoulders making looking back easier. Same on the left side. I don't straddle much going forward which makes the tippy feeling worse.
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Old October 17th, 2017, 07:32 PM   #14
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Funny, when I swap, from inline to quad, I immediately start skating backwards. The method to this madness is, I naturally straddle a lot when going backwards which is a lot more stable for a quad. When I am looking over my right shoulder, I will typically have my right foot pushed way back, to open my hips and shoulders making looking back easier. Same on the left side. I don't straddle much going forward which makes the tippy feeling worse.
During my rink days I skated backwards 90% of the "open skate" time. Backwards on quads is somehow anatomically more correct for a human. I used to know the reasoning behind this but have forgotten the details. Maybe someone has a link or feels like typing up a dissertation on it.
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Old October 18th, 2017, 02:57 AM   #15
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During my rink days I skated backwards 90% of the "open skate" time. Backwards on quads is somehow anatomically more correct for a human. I used to know the reasoning behind this but have forgotten the details. Maybe someone has a link or feels like typing up a dissertation on it.
Wow. I had never heard that about backwards skating. Thinking about it, backwards is mostly quadracep. You lean in, are crouched a bit, then at the right moment you push with the quad. Going forward is more of a quad/glute motion.
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Old October 18th, 2017, 04:00 AM   #16
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Wow. I had never heard that about backwards skating. Thinking about it, backwards is mostly quadracep. You lean in, are crouched a bit, then at the right moment you push with the quad. Going forward is more of a quad/glute motion.
As I recall it has a lot to do with how your weight is placed on the skate wheels, where backwards is like steering a forklift (rear wheel steering) and frontwards skating is like steering a car. When you parallel park your car, you BACK IN, right? Why can't you just pull in forwards? Same reason a skate going backwards steers better. Same reason a fork lift has rear-wheel steering so it can navigate narrow warehouse isles better.

Also, going forward a skater's foot is the main lever with the fulcrum at the ankle. Skating backwards the main lever is the lower leg with the fulcrum at the knee. Or maybe forward the fulcrum is just the knee and backward adds a fulcrum at the ankle as well - nearly doubling efficiency.

As well as the different muscle groups involved as you mentioned.

There is a lot more to it than this, and I do not have those facts perfectly correct, but you get the gist.
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Old October 21st, 2017, 01:48 PM   #17
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My wife and I are looking to possibly get back into Quad Skating some 30 years later.

We have lots of questions such as the following:

1.) With our primary application being outdoors, which QUAD skates would you recommend that would serve us well, yet not require a 2nd mortgage on the house?

Used careeras off Ebay, msrp is 200, and often found for 40 to 50 ish . or other used skater from various fb groups selling derby gear etc. Carreras have plastic plates, Suregrip Probe plates to be exact. Plastic is good for outdoor use as it deadens vibrations a bit more, and is fairly comfortable... However, a word of caution, there are older ones and they don't have the same comfy boots. The good ones are the ones in white, with apparent padding at the ankle.

2.) Low cuts or the boot version? Your perspective and opinion on going with either of them?

What is your normal footwear like? I would start with something that you find comfortable in every day running use. Like a boot that has about a 1/4 inch rise from the ball to the heel of the boot. Pretty standard heel height for the most part.

3.) What size and durometer of wheel would you suggest for best results?

Atom poison slims or wides even. Usually can be found for sale second hand from derby peeps looking to upgrade their wheels. 62x38 or 62x44 would do you well, their duro is 84A.

4.) Any unique gear recommendations?

Buy it, n DIY it. Like...soccer boots, remove cleats, mount your own plates.. (which can be much more of the budget allocation to get good things that matter, such as plates and wheels ), as goodwill or other thrift stores may have a set of cleats in your size for near nothing. Athletic shoes like soccer, football, rugby etc have good reinforcements in the boot and are well suited for the task, also you have a chance to try before you buy for an excellent fit. Break in, if any, is also minimal.

5.) Any great dealers that have the best prices and service?

Depends where you live

Please stop by with your thoughts ASAP.

Thank you for your time and willingness to share here.

There are a lot of options, got a budget for both sets of gear for you 2?
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Old October 23rd, 2017, 05:43 PM   #18
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Carreras are decent enough starter skates, but the ones with the padded ankle are plastic and the padding breaks town pretty easily. The older ones are leather uppers and break in very nicely and will take a serious beating.

Footy boots are also a good outdoor skate. Check the soccer stores or sporting goods stores or places like Marshall's or Ross for closeouts. You can often find nice brand name leather for $20-25. Stick a Super-X on the bottom and never look back.
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Old October 24th, 2017, 07:13 AM   #19
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Carreras are decent enough starter skates, but the ones with the padded ankle are plastic and the padding breaks town pretty easily. The older ones are leather uppers and break in very nicely and will take a serious beating.
All the black boots I've had through my hands were very poor on the padding quality. The whites ones only 1 sucked out of 4. True not many have good ankle padding tho.

I've learned to tell the differences by now mainly, if it looks like a running shoes side wall padding, it's crappy. If it looks thick like the top of basketball shoes, it's a good one.

Only problem I see with most of them is that the boots usually come off the soles due to poor gluing.
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Old October 24th, 2017, 09:53 PM   #20
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All the black boots I've had through my hands were very poor on the padding quality. The whites ones only 1 sucked out of 4. True not many have good ankle padding tho.

I've learned to tell the differences by now mainly, if it looks like a running shoes side wall padding, it's crappy. If it looks thick like the top of basketball shoes, it's a good one.

Only problem I see with most of them is that the boots usually come off the soles due to poor gluing.
I went to inline boots for all the above reasons, Just have to find the right ones that fit.
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