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Quad Roller Skating Forum Discussions about quad roller skates and any other quad skating discussions that do not seem appropriate for one of our other forums.

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Old June 7th, 2018, 06:12 AM   #1
campingnut
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Default Returning to skating after 20+ years...

Hello everyone-

I am returning to skating after more than 20 years and am looking for advice on a set of skates (quads). I am a big guy (300 lbs), and not young any more...lol. If possible, I would like to have a set of skates I could use both indoors and out. I have started to research, but there are so many options, it is quite overwhelming. I like to cruise and dance on skates, I do not jump. I am not into speed. I really just want a good all around set I can take to the park or rink.

I have seen skates beginning around $150 (not sure if they are any good) all the way up to a set of Berryís...I do not have a set budget, but I want something that is reasonable (although I am not sure what is reasonable...hehe).

Thank you for the advice.
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Old June 7th, 2018, 09:33 PM   #2
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Hello everyone-

I am returning to skating after more than 20 years and am looking for advice on a set of skates (quads). I am a big guy (300 lbs), and not young any more...lol. If possible, I would like to have a set of skates I could use both indoors and out. I have started to research, but there are so many options, it is quite overwhelming. I like to cruise and dance on skates, I do not jump. I am not into speed. I really just want a good all around set I can take to the park or rink.

I have seen skates beginning around $150 (not sure if they are any good) all the way up to a set of Berryís...I do not have a set budget, but I want something that is reasonable (although I am not sure what is reasonable...hehe).

Thank you for the advice.
@300 My recommendation would be a metal plate. Keeping expenses down with metal makes it an invader or competitor plate by suregrip. You can have skates built @ conniesskateshop on the net. Use euro sizing to get close for boots. The Sure Grip stuff is tough enough for the outdoors. Then you should run 2 sets of wheels, one for indoors and the other for outdoors. Keep things basic and you might get a decent pair of skates for around $300, give ot take.
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Old June 7th, 2018, 09:46 PM   #3
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Lots of skate groups on FB with good used gear.

I'd look for a used set of rollerbones turbos 97A or so for the indoor wheels, and maybe atom poisons for outdoor, also used if possible.

Almost all boot manufacturers have the "last" size listed(the fake foot their boot is built around). Find one that fits your size foot. Know what width length and to some degree , circumference your feet are.

Sometimes people sell very nice gear for cheap. More so the very large or very small sizes. So you could be in luck there.
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Old June 9th, 2018, 12:00 AM   #4
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Default and dont discount ebay

or gumtree if you get that in your location.
if your not needing a high boot you can save big dollars by using soccer boots with the stops cut off.purpose built skate boots are around $200 alone new for a decent pair
Second hand plate trucks and wheels, sure grip stuff is good value for money.
Even the older stuff like wallaby plates can be bought back to life cheaply.
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Old June 10th, 2018, 03:00 AM   #5
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Thanks everyone for the info. Iím going to research what you have posted and let you know what I come up with...
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Old June 10th, 2018, 04:48 AM   #6
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So I have found this...

https://www.skates.com/Sure-Grip-37-...sg37bkcroc.htm

They are made by SureGrip and they have a metal plate. Are there any negatives you could see with this set?
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Old June 10th, 2018, 04:52 AM   #7
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Now that I look at them closer, I do not think the plates are metal.
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Old June 10th, 2018, 04:55 AM   #8
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if your not needing a high boot...
What is the difference between a high and a low boot? I have only ever skated with a high boot (rental).
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Old June 10th, 2018, 05:49 AM   #9
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A high top boot generally has more ankle support than a low top boot. The high top boots also tend to have higher heels, which shifts you onto your toes more than a lot top boot would. It's mostly personal preference, personally I skated on low top jamskating boots that didn't have a heel at all (Flat sole) for a year before switching to stiff high top freestyle boots to provide extra support for jumps. The main difference for me was that I was used to a ton of lateral ankle flexion with the lower boots that allowed more flexibility and when switching to the high tops I couldn't do certain tricks like the iceberg. (Video I found for visualization purposes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z8vyJAu4uH4)
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Old June 11th, 2018, 05:05 AM   #10
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I think I want high tops for the extra support.

Any thoughts on vinyl vs leather boots? Besides the obvious...leather will outlast vinyl, are there other advantages vs disadvantages to each?
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Old June 11th, 2018, 06:32 AM   #11
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Default Im a bit late on the answer

Quote:
Originally Posted by campingnut View Post
What is the difference between a high and a low boot? I have only ever skated with a high boot (rental).
The heel and high ankle is restrictive if you want to do speed and full hockey stops ,but if you like to do spins and jump the high boot is preferred.
I tried inline boots on quad plates at first but i ended up just buying $49 soccerboots and they are comfortable from the get go.
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Old June 12th, 2018, 01:47 AM   #12
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Quote:
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What is the difference between a high and a low boot? I have only ever skated with a high boot (rental).
On a high top boot, you are restricted in movement. It helps maintain your angle when coming down from a jump so that the skate doesn't suddenly turn or your ankle turn. Some people like the high tops but leave them loose.

Low tops give you more freedom of movement for sudden direction changes and ankle articulation. Less rub on the sides of your legs and ankles if you do a lot of turns and cutting through traffic.

When I started skating, I was in high tops. It took a while to get used to low tops. So buy the right boot and you will be happy. Boots are very important to your feet.
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Old June 18th, 2018, 04:25 AM   #13
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Okay, so I finally went into the local skate shop, Skates on Haight, and ordered a set of skates...I ended up with:

Riedell 120 Fitness Deluxe boots (they really fit my foot shape well)
Plates...Iím not sure, but I ordered metal, double action
Wheels, 2 sets...outdoor...Suregrip Boardwalk 65mm
indoor...Rollerbones 62mm, 101a
Bearings...Bones Reds

They are going to build them for me. I am super busy this week, but I should be able to pick them up next weekend.
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Old June 23rd, 2018, 05:00 AM   #14
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Now that I have the skates (Iím picking them up in the next few days), I need some advice on breaking in a new set of boots. Any and all thoughts are greatly appreciated.
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Old June 23rd, 2018, 03:11 PM   #15
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Quote:
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Now that I have the skates (Iím picking them up in the next few days), I need some advice on breaking in a new set of boots. Any and all thoughts are greatly appreciated.
As soon as you get them, put them on and crank them down(tightly lace them to your feet) while at the house. 15 minuites here and there will help get them ready for the rink. Maybe do the dishes while wearing them. I walked around my house with mine on and watched tv/movies then just unloaded when it got uncomfortable.


Use over under lacing.
https://www.fieggen.com/shoelace/overunderlacing.htm

Lacebite, if you know what it is, can also be prevented(well, pretty much eliminated ) by using this lacing style with a modification. On the last eyelets instead of crossing over from left to right sides, you just keep the laces from crossing on the last wrung. Just bring them up through the last holes on the same side. This gives extra room for the tendon(s) that pull your toes toward your your shin. This mainly applies to lower cut boots where the lacing ends just above the ankles.

I'd also recommend applying a thin film of grease to the moving parts of your skates suspension. Like where the trucks and cushions meet, and where the pivot pin goes into the truck if it is rubber bushed.
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Old June 24th, 2018, 12:11 AM   #16
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Now that I have the skates (Iím picking them up in the next few days), I need some advice on breaking in a new set of boots. Any and all thoughts are greatly appreciated.
The boots are thick leather, your skin is thin leather.
The first several skates should be aimed at just spending time in the boots, the laces should be as loose as possible, just spend time in the boots and let your body heat mold them, not your foot shape, or your feet will blister and bruise and lose the battle, the boots arenít thin stretchable vanilla boots, they are top grain cow hide, 1/2 hours at a time.

I like to use lots of body lotion (coco oil) on my feet to decrease friction, well new boots are all about friction, and the oil is great at softening the leather, better the oil than your blood.
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Old June 24th, 2018, 05:18 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by Mort View Post
As soon as you get them, put them on and crank them down(tightly lace them to your feet) while at the house. 15 minuites here and there will help get them ready for the rink. Maybe do the dishes while wearing them. I walked around my house with mine on and watched tv/movies then just unloaded when it got uncomfortable.
This is a great idea...I see some movie watching in skates in my future...lol

Quote:
Use over under lacing.
https://www.fieggen.com/shoelace/overunderlacing.htm

Lacebite, if you know what it is, can also be prevented(well, pretty much eliminated ) by using this lacing style with a modification.
Any thoughts of lacing all the way up vs only to the ankle? I am a really big guy and I feel I need the extra support for my ankles...
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Old June 24th, 2018, 05:22 AM   #18
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I like to use lots of body lotion (coco oil) on my feet to decrease friction, well new boots are all about friction, and the oil is great at softening the leather, better the oil than your blood.
Do you wear socks with this oil or are you skating without socks?

When I use rentals, I always wear two pairs of socks to prevent blisters.
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Old June 24th, 2018, 09:13 PM   #19
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My boot is full grain leather BTW (before they just went to using top grain)

Quote:
Originally Posted by campingnut View Post
Any thoughts of lacing all the way up vs only to the ankle? I am a really big guy and I feel I need the extra support for my ankles...
The whole "support" is kind of misleading as it's not really support, but restriction.

When you begin to immobilize a joint, you increase the stress to other areas when something would go wrong. A joint will not gain strength, however after some time skating your muscles will know what range of movement is normal, and what is not. Flexibility is essential to reduce joint damage when a fall, slip, or unwanted/extreme movement happens. People mistake strength with coordination most often when talking about joints. Once your muscle groups are conditioned well they(ankles) will feel stronger.

Eventually you can run things looser such as suspension, for easier movement and make the skate carve with less effot. This can make it easier to skate for longer periods of time

Lacing lower will help free up your range of motion, but in the same turn your body will need to be ready for the increased range of motion. You essentially need muscle control in the ranges of motion skating uses. That control makes that stability you want. The more range of movement in the knees and ankles from lacing lower, the better you will be able to rock your knees left or right of the plate to gain leverage over the suspension. Stance is part of that as well. Lowering your ride height by bending the ankles, knees, and being bent over very slightly at the hips helps have the body coiled up to be able to make a move. A straight body cannot push. Think of a kid slouching when they give a parent attitude , like that "I don't wanna! " as they drop their height a few inches


Oils and/or lotions are going to usually cause slip, and make your feet slide around inside to your boots or socks. Ideally you want maximum friction, as in, no slip what so ever. The goal is to have a boot become a second skin. There should be enough padding to flex slightly, without causing a slip between your foot and the sock, or the sock and the boots. I disagree with lotions put on before or for during your time skating. The feedback won't be consistent.

Socks... what they are made out of is not nearly as important as a tight fitting sock. Some forum members will recommend rather expensive socks, or certain wicking docs, bunch of bs really. I personally wear regular old padded cotton crew socks from Wal-Mart. Works great. But knowing why is key. I have a size 11.5 to 12 foot. This means the sock is at its upper end of the foot it was made to fit, which for men's socks is size 6 to 12. So there is virtually no way it can bunch up. Many of the "athletic" wicking socks I have tried are horrible. Their friction between the sock and the boot is poor, and feels like my foot is slipping in the skate, which makes me try to dig into the boots some with my toes to keep traction. This can cause foot cramping, or mess with the confidence you have in your skates since your feet wont feel secure. Don't do what I do though,, do what works for you.

Also socks change the volume of your foot. If your feet are different sizes, one foot may feel better with a very thin sock, while the other feels/fits best with a more padded sock. So tight fitting sock, and use the appropriate thickness to augment for your best fit.

In the end, it all comes down to how you want that skate to feel. Thinner socks will result in more feedback, thicker socks, less chance of blisters usually if they fit right, but can Darden the feedback a little, or make the skate feel slightly slower to react.
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Old June 25th, 2018, 02:41 PM   #20
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Experiment with your socks and lacing pattern. I have nine pairs of skates and I try to use all of them in rotation. This pair for a few weeks and then a different one.

Almost none of my skates have the same boot. My Riedell 195 Grand Prix boots work best with socks that are so thin that they are like super-thin dress socks, but they are a polypropylene and cotton athletic sock. And I have to snug them up as tight as I can from bottom to top.

My Riedell RS1000 boots work best with socks that are thin on the top and fairly thick on the bottom. And all cotton. These boots I lace very tight on the lower half and barely snug on the upper half.

And then I have fiberglass boots that hold their form. I slide my foot in and the laces are almost, but not quite, just there for decoration.

So I have an entire drawer full of skate socks for my different skates. For some boots it is essential to have the right socks and for some other boots it doesn't matter so much. So experiment.

Cotton gets stiff and loses its loft after a certain number of wash cycles. So socks that started out as good for a particular boot may end up being not so good after a while.

Previous comments that are good advice are: You don't necessarily need to go to a sporting goods store to find good socks. On the other hand, you may or may not find good socks at a Job Lots, for instance. Every once in a while they'll have some good ones and the rest of the time you go home empty handed. Other good advice is to wear your new boots around the house. I even put my skates on in the house both times I had a broken arm and couldn't go skating at all. It helps shape your boot, but it helps shape your skater's brain as well.

Hope this helps. Now go out and experiment.
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