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Roller Derby Forum Discussions about banked-track and flat-track roller derby events, teams, skaters, and training methods.

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Old July 19th, 2014, 02:45 PM   #1
Lily Pad
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Default Derby Endurance

So I'm just starting out in derby. My league takes everyone, since they're a startup, no matter your skill level. Mine's very low (confident forward skating) and so I go to practice and do what I can. What's killing me is my lack of endurance. I'm okay with doing dumbed down drills or struggling through them but my body just can't keep up -- whether it's a pace line drill or the pace of practice.

I skate as hard as I can, until my body collapses or I'm dry heaving, and I'd rather not struggle so hard or keep taking breaks. Are there any drills that will help get my endurance up?
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Old July 19th, 2014, 08:16 PM   #2
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im coming from the same thing at the moment, for the past few months ive been a high rotation jammer typically jamming 1 out of 3 sometimes 1 on 1 off and i have had a hard time keeping that pace.
so far ive found dropping some of the extra weight i was carrying has helped, are you carrying additional weight you could do without? if so i can tell you that diet is 80-90% of the battle any exercise we get is icing on the cake (we shouldnt eat).
if its purely a aerobic conditioning issue i advocate a resistance training program with High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) 3 times per week. the reason i advocate this method is as follows;

1. the resistance portion of the program will have you stronger and more stable as well as less likely to be injured.

2. HIIT is the most relevant mode of "cardio" in my opinion as you get conditioned to changing intensity and should yield both aerobic an anaerobic gains, another benefit of HIIT is that due to the high intensity you get the work out done faster as opposed to steady pace long distance.

it really depends how serious you are about it, i personally started at the gym to improve for derby but now ive developed a fondness for resistance training and get a lot of joy from it but it took me about 4 months of regular training to get that point prior to that it was fueled by the desire to loose weight (dropped 20kg/45lbs in 3 months), if you dont feel you could gain from resistance training then taking up running is good be sure to mix training modes.
there are many options available i personally like the HIIT as i can rock out to my music, run hard and be done in half an hour.
i personally wouldnt get hung up on doing specific drills it really comes down to conditioning your body to operate constantly at the elevated heart rate, sure you can run grape vines etc and that helps with agility...sort of but really you want to get your body used to working with that load on it.
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Old July 19th, 2014, 08:26 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by Lily Pad View Post
Are there any drills that will help get my endurance up?
Hi, Lily!
Yeah...remember when I referred you back to that earlier post? There were a couple in there (cariocas and lateral crossovers done in specific ways). Something else we (hockey players) do, off ice (or off skates, if you please) that builds play-endurance are short sprints. Start out by sprinting 5-10 seconds and then walking for at least three-times as long as you sprinted (but for no longer than one minute). If you look at the way hockey is played (skating portion only), it is very similar to the way derby is skated (a lot of cruising with more than occasional "taking-off"). This is one of the best ways to train for hockey or derby endurance. Of course, other aerobic activity (cycling, zoomba, or whatever) is going to be very helpful also. Now...the Nurse in me wants to make sure that you know... Don't push it too hard/too often just starting out. Look into target heart rates applicable to the type of training you wish to do in order to make the gains you wish to make. I will also strongly urge you to consult with a medical professional, in person, (if you haven't already) so that you may have recommendations toward what you will tolerate regarding a training regimen--they call us individuals for a reason.

Last edited by Kiepur_Inlein; July 19th, 2014 at 08:29 PM. Reason: Damn that Siri!
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Old July 20th, 2014, 05:12 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by Lily Pad View Post
I skate as hard as I can, until my body collapses or I'm dry heaving, and I'd rather not struggle so hard or keep taking breaks. Are there any drills that will help get my endurance up?
Yep. Don't go all out. You can do this with a heart rate monitor and heart rate zone training. The cheaper option is to go at an effort that just barely gets you breathing heavily. It's easier to figure out what I mean by "heavily" if you do the heart rate zones with a monitor a couple of times, but not necessary. Hold that level of exertion for 1-2 hours.

I actually do this on a bike. It's training your heart to be more efficient and increasing your red blood cell count, which means more oxygen to the muscles. So the type of exercise doesn't really matter.

You can also go longer if your technique is better. I see a lot of people working really hard just to keep up, and their form is terrible. Bad form means you waste a lot of energy just moving body parts around rather than propelling yourself forward. So take the time to do things right.

You can do both these things on your own time. You can still go all out at practice. Obviously don't expect things to change in the first week, but if you keep at it things will get better.
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Old July 20th, 2014, 06:20 AM   #5
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You can do both these things on your own time. You can still go all out at practice. Obviously don't expect things to change in the first week, but if you keep at it things will get better.
So this response will be whining, but this point here nails my issue on the head.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Daveho
are you carrying additional weight you could do without?
Yes. I started a journey of losing 70 pounds before roller derby (really, before skating). I lost 11 before I heard about the league and had been skating 2-3 times a week as exercise. Then, I could only go for 30 minutes and that was just doing laps.

I haven't weighed myself in a while, but still, I have 59 pounds that I'm carting around and that's not going to fall off overnight. Derby will certainly melt it away if I keep eating as well as I normally do, but it's not disappearing that soon. (45 pounds in 3 months? Seems a little much. I average 1-2 pounds off a week)

But to WJ's point, this isn't going to change over night and I recognize that. My league is almost all veterans, with only one other fresh meat player who has been in it for five months. She's got more endurance than me and our skill levels are about even. But she's not always there, so I'm fighting to keep up with veterans. I keep hearing over and over, "Don't worry, it'll get easier with time" but when they decide to run paceline drills and I can't keep up at all, what's the point? Most of the drills aren't geared towards fresh meat, and I get why. The head coach tells me that it's normal to not be able to do everything at first, but I get so self-judgmental that all I do is watch other skaters while I mentally kick my own ass for not being good enough. This is totally defeating and a mental issue I'm trying to cope with.

What's worse, I can barely make an hour at practice before needing to sit down because I'm either faint or nauseous. They keep telling me that taking breaks is fine, but I feel like I'm wasting their time. And let's face it, I don't WANT to be faint and nauseous. Part of me believes that I should just stop attending practices and work on endurance/basic skating skills on my own, but I don't know if that's a cop out.

So part of me wonders if I can even cut it. I started roller derby because of I love to roller skate and am in a period of my life where I have to prove to myself that I can be great (I work a job that can be demoralizing at times, so I need this). But it's proven to be more frustrating. Is this something that passes with more time and harder work?

Like I said, whiny.
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Old July 20th, 2014, 01:12 PM   #6
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Hi, Lily...
Please don't quit skating... I do wonder though... How close do you live to everywhere you need to get daily? You would not believe what just 2-3 miles a day of walking will do...in just a few months. Also, do you drink as much water as would be recommended for your size? Toward that end, you should really (at this stage of your life) be drinking nothing else. What you drink (or don't drink) is a commonly overlooked hindrance to better health. Even diet drinks are a bad idea. Did you know that there have been studies which cause many in the medical community to believe that sucralose aggravates insulin response and can actually help to cause diabetes? Now the jury is still out a bit, but I can tell you that most who're touting it as completely safe have interests on the NYSE--it's hard to beat Mother Nature. Now I'm not saying this is you, but it never seems to amaze me at how many people I meet who will wonder why they they don't look or feel healthy, as they put crap into their bodies ("I feel sluggish...I need a can of <nearly pure acid> Mountain Dew. How am I supposed to exercise and loose all of this weight if I constantly feel like this? Oooh...12-packs of Dr. Pepper are on sale..."). Sugary and/or diet drinks are among the very top of the problems with public health.

Last edited by Kiepur_Inlein; July 20th, 2014 at 01:14 PM. Reason: %#¥!! Siri!
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Old July 20th, 2014, 01:32 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by Lily Pad View Post
...
So part of me wonders if I can even cut it. I started roller derby because of I love to roller skate and am in a period of my life where I have to prove to myself that I can be great (I work a job that can be demoralizing at times, so I need this). But it's proven to be more frustrating. Is this something that passes with more time and harder work?
...
And yes...it will pass with time and hard work. Loosing 70lbs requires a nearly complete lifestyle change, so you may be surprised by which "work" will prove be the hardest.
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Old July 20th, 2014, 03:04 PM   #8
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Hi, Lily...
Please don't quit skating... I do wonder though... How close do you live to everywhere you need to get daily? You would not believe what just 2-3 miles a day of walking will do...in just a few months. Also, do you drink as much water as would be recommended for your size? Toward that end, you should really (at this stage of your life) be drinking nothing else. What you drink (or don't drink) is a commonly overlooked hindrance to better health. Even diet drinks are a bad idea. Did you know that there have been studies which cause many in the medical community to believe that sucralose aggravates insulin response and can actually help to cause diabetes? Now the jury is still out a bit, but I can tell you that most who're touting it as completely safe have interests on the NYSE--it's hard to beat Mother Nature. Now I'm not saying this is you, but it never seems to amaze me at how many people I meet who will wonder why they they don't look or feel healthy, as they put crap into their bodies ("I feel sluggish...I need a can of <nearly pure acid> Mountain Dew. How am I supposed to exercise and loose all of this weight if I constantly feel like this? Oooh...12-packs of Dr. Pepper are on sale..."). Sugary and/or diet drinks are among the very top of the problems with public health.
I actually don't live close to anything. Almost everywhere I go is a 20-30 minute drive. To that end, I had no clue how hard derby practice would be. It's not the individual drills themselves; it's the pace. There are no breaks in between and that's the part that's killing me. Like I said before, I don't mind being bad at a drill; I mind not be able to even try it.

As far as my weight loss efforts, everything is moving along swimmingly. A lot of my weight is from drinking (both sugary drinks and alcohol) and not so much bad eating habits (though it's there, too). I started this journey in late April, so it hasn't been too much time (I only weigh myself once a month, since I think weighing yourself once a week is not a good measurement of success, especially in women, since we have so much cyclical flux. Also, the scale is a horrible measurement of fitness. It doesn't tell you anything about bodily changes, like muscle growth). I gave up sugary drinks and I drink water primarily, then tea (no additives) and the occasional Coke Zero (I know, it's bad, but I maybe have one of these maybe once or twice a month). The weight comes off pretty easily, especially when I track what I'm eating.

But lowering weight will not help endurance. Yes, it'll put less strain on my body, but I see people half my size having just as hard of a problem. That said, I'm taking your words to heart; I can't always skate, but I do want to work on general endurance, so I want to work on the Couch to 5K program. I have a treadmill in my house. This will not have the start-stop endurance, but I can learn that via skating and practice. I have to get my heart willing to work for longer stretches than 10 minutes at a time.

It's a long battle. For me, eating better is WAY easier than getting fit, while I know a lot of others are the opposite. I'm good at being strict with myself with food.
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Old July 20th, 2014, 04:05 PM   #9
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I keep hearing over and over, "Don't worry, it'll get easier with time" but when they decide to run paceline drills and I can't keep up at all, what's the point?

<snip>

Part of me believes that I should just stop attending practices and work on endurance/basic skating skills on my own, but I don't know if that's a cop out.
<snip>

So part of me wonders if I can even cut it.
I'm a speed skater. I did it for years growing up, but I stopped the year before I went to college because there was just too much else going on, and the closest team was over an hour away. I didn't restart until a couple of years into grad school, so that was an 8-9 year break.

When I went to my first few practices it was almost embarrassing. No 25 year old wants to be beaten by the 11 year olds. They weren't just beating me either - they were destroying me. After every drill I was lying on the floor gasping for air. That lasted for months. A couple of years later I was the fastest person on the team, hands down. Now I've been back for 4 years, and the 15 year olds are catching me again, but that isn't so bad. I'm competitive at a national level for my age division.

Fitness takes time. If you really like what you are doing don't be discouraged unless it is doing harm. Just be smart about your workouts. Don't go hard every day of the week, because then your muscles don't have the necessary recovery time. Mix up endurance and sprint workouts. And work on the technique. Believe me, that goes a long way. I can lap people in better shape because they wear themselves out with poor form.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lily Pad View Post
(45 pounds in 3 months? Seems a little much. I average 1-2 pounds off a week)
2 pounds a week is what I have seen as the maximum recommendation for losing weight while maintaining or increasing fitness. Much more than that and your body starts eating muscles to burn energy, making things counterproductive. Of course, I am sure the actual number depends on your personal body composition.
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Last edited by WJCIV; July 21st, 2014 at 02:36 PM. Reason: typo - loosing to losing
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Old July 20th, 2014, 09:19 PM   #10
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i believe the recommendation is up 3lbs per week max, when i was cutting weight i was probably eating more then most, the difference is that it was from whole foods, a heap of fresh veggies, clean meats, nuts,some fruit and protein supplement (post workout) but i wasn't tracking my food intake, the energy in them was just so much lower then the "typical"diet of today. weight loss happens in the kitchen, not the gym.
i would urge you to do your own research into HIIT training, the effects of steady long distance running, cardiovascular conditioning etc prior to making any decisions about your fitness goals, following a general plan like couch to 5km or what have you is like riding the bus, sure your going somewhere but is it where you wanna go? read up, theres lots of good sites out there, if your interested im happy to answer any questions i can.
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Old July 21st, 2014, 01:01 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lily Pad View Post
I skate as hard as I can, until my body collapses or I'm dry heaving, and I'd rather not struggle so hard or keep taking breaks. Are there any drills that will help get my endurance up?
While it COULD be you general endurance, I don't know you so it is hard to guesstimate, it could also be that you, compared lets say to someone like me, just need to exert yourself hard because skating is not yet wired in your brain. Skating for me is so easy, muscle memory, it is not a workout unless I go HARD.

So, if your general endurance is not bad, you may still experience a lesser skating endurance until you build muscle memory, break that awkward threshold, and skating becomes easy.
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Old July 22nd, 2014, 06:36 AM   #12
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How much do you sweat going all out at Derby practice.
You may easily be triggering electrolyte imbalances during strenuous physical activity, especially if you sweat much. You may want to look at hydration concerns.

Balance Electrolytes for Better Health -
http://w3.newsmax.com/newsletters/br...nce0714_75.pdf

Eliminating useless calories is a fast track to weight loss, but adding missing minerals can be very important for endurance. 80% of americans are magnesium deficient, even ones taking supplements. Too many americans are also iodine deficient, affecting thyroid function. Our farm soils have been "mined" of their minerals for decades, but only the N-P-K (nitrogen, potassium and phosphorous) get any attention for replacing them, while other key soil nutrient minerals are just ignores and are steadily becoming more depleted.

Taking highly absorbable magnesium citrate has helped me a lot this year to go from up 15 to 20+ nonstop miles with my outdoor quad speed workouts three times a week this year, and I feel less pooped when I finish now too.

Another thing to realize is that fresh meat skaters with less than optimum skater form will often expend a lot more effort skating with a lot less speed resulting from that effort. Have less focus on driving yourself so hard, and more attention on perfecting your form. The speed & endurance will emerge more quickly following that path.

Key things to work on:
1) spend more time skating with only one foot down and rolling - more centered below you.
2) skate lower to the floor and extend your strokes out wider, while moving your body further inward.
3) Keep a similar amount of weight on both front and rear axles at all times.
4) At faster speed, push straight out to the side - NOT REARWARD - and move your body inward more with each stroke
5) Widen your crossovers & pushunders as you learn to skate lower and gain confidence pushing strokes while rolling with just one foot down more of the time (except in lateral pushing battles).

-Armadillo
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Old July 22nd, 2014, 01:45 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by rufusprime99 View Post
While it COULD be you general endurance, I don't know you so it is hard to guesstimate, it could also be that you, compared lets say to someone like me, just need to exert yourself hard because skating is not yet wired in your brain. Skating for me is so easy, muscle memory, it is not a workout unless I go HARD.

So, if your general endurance is not bad, you may still experience a lesser skating endurance until you build muscle memory, break that awkward threshold, and skating becomes easy.
This!

I have watched so many people sweat like they're in a sauna while I can't even get warmed up.

Proficiency is everything in skating. I skate with some out-dated inlines and don't have problems keeping up with anyone reguardless of their gear.

A friend of mine went skating for the first time in 20 years, and he was never good to begin with, also hes not much of a athletic person. He was sweatting balls after 1 lap. 3 minuites of hardcore wiggle wobble motion around the rinks wall killed him. lol


Lily, you gotta have time to just go skate. A time where the ONLY focus is your skating and how it feels. where you can spend a few minuites on different skills, and come back to a certain skill that was giving you problems 20 minuites ago.

Sessions are great if you can find someone to watch. learning how they use their feet and transfer their weight to manipulate their inertia helps so much. Most of the time you can't do thyis in derby because your occupied learning tactics or watching more than just the skating.

just imagine never ever running or walking, then deciding your going to go play track and field games... how successful that would be. Go skate :P

Like Dillo said , Diet is important too!
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Old July 22nd, 2014, 05:41 PM   #14
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So these were all great and I have responses for each of you, so here goes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by WJCIV
When I went to my first few practices it was almost embarrassing. No 25 year old wants to be beaten by the 11 year olds. They weren't just beating me either - they were destroying me. After every drill I was lying on the floor gasping for air. That lasted for months. A couple of years later I was the fastest person on the team, hands down. Now I've been back for 4 years, and the 15 year olds are catching me again, but that isn't so bad. I'm competitive at a national level for my age division.
So this still applies to me. When I first started skating, I was so slow that the kids and teenagers flew by me at the rink. Now, not so much. But at practice, it's an entirely different story; I am the slowest by far. I think the issue is not just endurance, but technique, like you said. I am working harder to do something than they are, and I think it all comes down to get low and making sure I get the most of my stride, but I'm glad to see I'm not the only one who has had this issue.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Daveho
i believe the recommendation is up 3lbs per week max, when i was cutting weight i was probably eating more then most, the difference is that it was from whole foods, a heap of fresh veggies, clean meats, nuts,some fruit and protein supplement (post workout) but i wasn't tracking my food intake, the energy in them was just so much lower then the "typical"diet of today. weight loss happens in the kitchen, not the gym.
i would urge you to do your own research into HIIT training, the effects of steady long distance running, cardiovascular conditioning etc prior to making any decisions about your fitness goals, following a general plan like couch to 5km or what have you is like riding the bus, sure your going somewhere but is it where you wanna go? read up, theres lots of good sites out there, if your interested im happy to answer any questions i can.
45 pounds in three months is more like 4 pounds a week, but weight loss does flux. Be that as it may, I've heard both from medical journals and others with experience that 2 pounds is the max, so please be careful. I totally agree that weight loss starts in the kitchen but weight loss really isn't my issue here. The weight is coming off in a steady stream. As far as HIIT, totally agreed, but HIIT is dangerous if you're not basically fit already, which I am not. Getting there, but not quite. Currently, for fitness, I also run the C25K program, which is an endurance builder. I will add HIIT down the line once my body is in better shape.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rufusprime99
While it COULD be you general endurance, I don't know you so it is hard to guesstimate, it could also be that you, compared lets say to someone like me, just need to exert yourself hard because skating is not yet wired in your brain. Skating for me is so easy, muscle memory, it is not a workout unless I go HARD.
Totally nailed it. Completely. I'm halfway to skating becoming natural, and I will tell you, I am worse when I have time to think. When I don't, my skating isn't much of an issue, I'm sweating less and the minute I start thinking, I fall apart again. Which leads me to...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mort
This!

I have watched so many people sweat like they're in a sauna while I can't even get warmed up.

Proficiency is everything in skating. I skate with some out-dated inlines and don't have problems keeping up with anyone reguardless of their gear.

A friend of mine went skating for the first time in 20 years, and he was never good to begin with, also hes not much of a athletic person. He was sweatting balls after 1 lap. 3 minuites of hardcore wiggle wobble motion around the rinks wall killed him. lol


Lily, you gotta have time to just go skate. A time where the ONLY focus is your skating and how it feels. where you can spend a few minuites on different skills, and come back to a certain skill that was giving you problems 20 minuites ago.
I understand this and pretty sure we've talked about this before. I DO skate, but the issue is that I can't keep up. Session skating is not necessarily conducive (in my area at least) for practicing derby skills. Sure, it's great for agility, but if I want to practice laps, I can't because there's some kid on the floor. If I want to practice stops, I can't, because someone is flying through the area I'm practicing in or some kids decide to sit on the floor playing on their phones. I'm about to give up on rinks, because it costs too much money considering how dirty they are, how horribly they're managed and the fact that I am fighting to just practice something. My own league doesn't even use rinks; we use basketball courts and an outside roller hockey rink.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mort
just imagine never ever running or walking, then deciding your going to go play track and field games... how successful that would be. Go skate :P
Maybe I misrepresented something along the way, but if you think I am just skating at practice, that is entirely not true. I've been skating before derby and I skate outside of derby. When I skate by myself, at my own pace, I am doing great. The issue is not that; the issue is keeping up with veterans. Which maybe I shouldn't try and just keep up with my own pace (which means forget pacelines or contact drills -- which will NOT work at practice).

Overall, I think WJ and Rufus nailed my problem: better form, fuller strides and MORE FLUIDS. I notice the crazy sweating happens after I don't drink enough and soon after, I'm on the bench, trying not to vomit.
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Old July 22nd, 2014, 05:46 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by Armadillo View Post
Taking highly absorbable magnesium citrate has helped me a lot this year to go from up 15 to 20+ nonstop miles with my outdoor quad speed workouts three times a week this year, and I feel less pooped when I finish now too.

Another thing to realize is that fresh meat skaters with less than optimum skater form will often expend a lot more effort skating with a lot less speed resulting from that effort. Have less focus on driving yourself so hard, and more attention on perfecting your form. The speed & endurance will emerge more quickly following that path.

Key things to work on:
1) spend more time skating with only one foot down and rolling - more centered below you.
2) skate lower to the floor and extend your strokes out wider, while moving your body further inward.
3) Keep a similar amount of weight on both front and rear axles at all times.
4) At faster speed, push straight out to the side - NOT REARWARD - and move your body inward more with each stroke
5) Widen your crossovers & pushunders as you learn to skate lower and gain confidence pushing strokes while rolling with just one foot down more of the time (except in lateral pushing battles).

-Armadillo
Argh! I thought I nabbed this bit in the post above, but I did want to point out that this seems helpful and I'm going to try, especially with the better form. I noticed on my last practice session that there was a certain point where I got low and I "got" derby form. I was low, felt rigid, the weight on my skate was evenly over the wheel and I didn't feel like I could fall forwards or backwards. Then, when pushing and bringing my wheels closer together without clipping, I was ZOOMING.

That's not yet natural; I have to think, "get lower" or "get your feet closer" but I think I'll be fighting much less with my body if I can get this natural. As Mort pointed out, more practice will get me there.
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Old July 22nd, 2014, 09:06 PM   #16
Daveho
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the point i was making with HIIT is that in also builds strength through the legs which obviously is beneficial for derby as opposed to long slow distances, when you do start on HIIT that its whats intense for YOU as opposed to say Tabata training and if you are concerned do consult with your health care pro, but point is just get your heart rate up there and keep it up there, the body dosnt have a choice but to adapt. as for my weight loss really i wasnt trying that hard.. still ate everything i love but just controlled portions..
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Old July 23rd, 2014, 02:00 AM   #17
rufusprime99
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Originally Posted by Lily Pad View Post
What's worse, I can barely make an hour at practice before needing to sit down because I'm either faint or nauseous. They keep telling me that taking breaks is fine, but I feel like I'm wasting their time. And let's face it, I don't WANT to be faint and nauseous. Part of me believes that I should just stop attending practices and work on endurance/basic skating skills on my own, but I don't know if that's a cop out.
You aren't going to be able to keep up with a bunch of vets. You need to take breaks. I don't know the structure of your practices, but if you are doing x activity for 15 minutes, take the last 5 minutes off. Then when you do the next activity for 15 minutes, again take the last 5 minutes off. If you are completely fatigued every time you start a new activity, you can't think. Your mind is wasted, and WHATEVER you are doing will be less effective. You will be going through the motions, but possibly, not getting the point of what you are doing, or do it sloppily courting injury as you go.

You can also step back from practice. 1-2 hours of medium intensity will do MORE for your endurance than this blood and guts practicing you describe. Do 30 minutes of forward crossovers in a circle, 10 laps one direction, 10 laps the other, and then 1-1.5 hours of just skating along enough to get your heart rate up. Just 3 or 4 weeks of this will build yourself a base of fitness. You will notice quite a difference when you go back to practice. Oh, and also some plyometrics, like fast feet. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=paGlPSs_Y9o

Drink ice water to aid in calorie burn as much as is practical.
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Old July 23rd, 2014, 02:55 AM   #18
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Drink ice water to aid in calorie burn as much as is practical.
But not during workouts. During workouts have room temperature water to avoid cramps. Also don't gulp water, since that can lead to cramps as well.

The rest of the day cold water is great.
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Old July 23rd, 2014, 06:50 AM   #19
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I'm not saying you don't skate, but there are so many transitions you can do during session as yo maneuver around people.

A lot of drills require certian skating strengths. This is a prime time to work on skating the compliments drills.

Basicly session is a playground, its usefulness is what you make of it. Theres so many things that matter.
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Old July 23rd, 2014, 09:39 AM   #20
Kiepur_Inlein
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...
4) At faster speed, push straight out to the side - NOT REARWARD -...
-Armadillo
Armadillo has a great post here for you, Lily, I just wanted to add a little to his point number 4 (as it's so fundamentally important to your skating). I would say that regardless of your speed, once you're rolling, you want to try to do a disciplined, efficient stroke when it comes to your stride. It's just as he said, push straight out to the side...
A lot of people just starting out think you have to angle your skate in order to keep propelling yourself along. It's funny... When I went to my wife's first fresh-meat practice, the fresh-meat instructor actually said to the group, "...you wanna hold your foot at about a 45-degree angle..." and I said, "Ah...can I interject here?" (I did not make friends with the fresh-meat coach that day, but now <no longer the fresh-meat coach> she asks for my advice here and there). When you do angle your skate on initiation of the stroke, you quickly plateau regarding energy in your stride...well before you're going as fast as you can physically go. This is because you soon become unable to push back at a rate that exceeds your forward motion. Now, when you do push your skate out to the side, you have the means to re-engage propulsion potential with each stroke and your speed will continue to build until you no longer have the strength to accelerate (we all have our limits). So, with your feet about shoulder-width apart, and knees bent, shift your weight about 90% away from your "glide-foot" and start your push straight out to the side, keeping your skates as close to parallel as anatomically possible as you initiate the push. Understand that you are transitioning that weight to your glide foot (about 50% mid-stroke tapering to 100% of the weight on your glide foot by the end of the stroke). Also understand that the "push" skate will not remain parallel through the whole stroke (it'll actually start to angle pretty quickly), but your job is to try as hard as you can to keep that skate as close to parallel as possible, minimizing the angle through the stroke. A less scary-sounding truth about the ease of a disciplined stroke is that if you hold at simply trying to keep the push parallel, your foot will fall away (naturally) once you've gotten out of it all there's to be had regarding propulsion. Then it's time to do it with the other leg.
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Last edited by Kiepur_Inlein; July 24th, 2014 at 06:59 AM. Reason: Brain flatulence (I was always a better "demonstrator" than "explainer"...
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