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Slalom Cone Skating Forum Discussions about slalom cone skating, high-jump, and other freestyle trick skating. (Note that vert, street, and park skating discussions should be posted in our aggressive skating forum.)

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Old October 4th, 2014, 05:10 AM   #1
Oicusk82huh
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Default shifting/turning on one foot

Question...how do you shift from forward to backward on one foot, or vice versa? Where does your weight go? Or more important, what foundation moves do you need to learn before learning this? Today started practicing Special through cones. I tried to learn Brush today, but I need professional help. About the shifting/turning on one foot, not sure if it's super advanced, or is this something anyone can learn?
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Old October 5th, 2014, 05:52 AM   #2
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forwards to backwards is easily done with pressure exerted on the toe while the heel swings around, backwards to forwards its heel pivots as the toe swings back around. you may produce as much actal lift as you want, or keep it really low to look like a flat shift.

You can do the opposite but its quite a bit harder as the amount of movement required by the pivoting wheel is greatly increased to keep up with even a slow pace/speed essentialy your wheel must preform a "K" turn, and thats taxing on ya.

You can flat shift your feet as well by alleviating pressure off a foot and flipping your foot around. essentailly is a "no height jump" and you litterally keep your foot just resting on the ground while the shift is done just before catching your weight. if done right its almost unseen- the jumping portion of the move that is-

hope that helps.
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Old October 10th, 2014, 08:41 AM   #3
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Thanks, that really helps. I still haven't tried it yet, but plan to tomorrow. The going is slow and robotic, but great with the Special, and I think I'll put off the Brush until my skills are better (maybe next year). Tomorrow I'll try the one foot shifting thing and since I'll be inside I'll work on my footgun (I never mind falling on a nice waxed floor). Any advice would be appreciated there too. Thanks again.
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Old October 11th, 2014, 12:54 AM   #4
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Here's the old thread from April http://skatelogforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=50750

Includes link to instructional video at Depew Roller Rink.
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Old October 23rd, 2014, 10:19 AM   #5
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That video really helped. Now I at least know how to start. Thanks!
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Old January 8th, 2015, 03:17 PM   #6
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There are 2 ways I like to do it. I still need to make it better though. Practice practice!
For miltiple shifts. (the only way I can do it right now)
Coming out of a backward skate to front skate using that force going onto the inside edge making a sharp arc at the end of tha tight arc leaning forward putting pressure on the ball of my foot then rotating my skate and hips to the outside edge of the skate. At that point you will be on the outside edge going into another arc. If you want to do multiple shifts or 3turns as they say in figure skating you will need to keep the acr tight and use your free leg to keep you propelling along with you hips. Where your hips go your shouldrers go.

Another way which is the same but slower and for a single shift. (Just screwing around grooving to the music)
Skating forward....1 foot..... Inside edge making a sharp "c" arc almost coming to a stop but right at the point before stopping you lean on the ball of your foot and again rotate the skate and your hips to the outside edge making a wide arc. You will be leaning quite a bit on the outside edge of the skate which will allow you to propell yourself out of the turn.

Here is a video of some edge work. When I skate I do most of these exercises to warm up. These are the basic foundation moves you asked for.
http://youtu.be/27Vyw_X04Y8. Found this to be the best video for exploring edges.
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Last edited by SVT CAMR; January 8th, 2015 at 04:47 PM.
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Old January 9th, 2015, 09:00 PM   #7
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Default Turns and Ice (yeah, changing the topic a bit)

Ugh! Still can't turn all the way. Front to back okay, but loose steam going from back to front. Sharp arc, weight forward, then rotate edge, skates/hips to outside? I really need to start trying again. Here's one I've been having fun with...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QiZeNK2YPRw

It's really fun, but stationary. Also when I tried ice skating I had an absolute blast doing this one (it was much easier on ice, think I found my new baby).

Do you guys ice skate too? If so, are hockey skates the way to go? The pair I rented looked like hockey, but had a very small tooth at the front. All the slalom moves translated beautifully on ice. Also jumping 360's were SOOOO easy. Loved it!!!

Thanks for the edge control video, those are super good drills, also good to teach kids, so thanks.
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Old January 9th, 2015, 09:46 PM   #8
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I use to ice skate and play ice hockey. Those days are over. Once in a while I pick up a stick with the kids while on inlines. What your describing on the ice skates is a toe pick. This comes on figure skates. Hockey skates do not have the toe pick and are very rockered. I would go with what ever you're comfortable with. Ice skating will make you a better inline skater over all.

Ask the figure skaters to help you with the 3 turn. That is how I learned it. The ice skates will enhance your edge work and will not allow for any sloppiness.

Once you get the single turn down the multiples will come.

What I have realized after reading what some others have said is my wheels are fighting me. The indoor floor has a lot of grip to begin with… then you throw in a grippy wheels and yes you lose momentum and get heavy resistance while trying to perform certain moves. An 88a or 90a may be in my future.

One of my biggest problems is I cannot turn my toes toward each other and be on the front wheels. Coming close but still can't grapevine and do certain freestyle moves because of it. It just feels so unnatural to me. I do not know if it was all the years of hockey but it is taking much longer than I thought it would to basic freestyle. Bottom line you have to live it to get good and if there is no one around to live it with how can you get better. Just keep skating!!!!!

heres one for iceskating (grapevine) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QjPT1x39UCk
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Old January 10th, 2015, 10:18 PM   #9
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I wrote a short guide about this a while back: http://skatelogforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=50686

There are a lot of variations on shift, but the one you most commonly see is generally referred to as the inner shift, where you travel in the same direction as back nelson using your outer edges.

Learning 3-turns and the like will help with learning shifts, but they're not the same. A 3-turn is what you do for rekils, but it'd be very difficult to transition from the end of a 3-turn into the start of a second shift. I'm also unsure how much quad videos would help you. With inlines there's a big emphasis on which edge you're skating on. You don't necessarily have to be on your outer edge for shifts, but the other variants are generally significantly harder, and sometimes take on different names as well (wheeling specials, wheeling brush, etc.)

For inner shifts, you want to always be on your outer edge. Start by going backwards, turn sharply until you stop, travel forwards to pass the cone, turn sharply until you stop again, and repeat.

Shifts aren't overly advanced, but they're not simple either and you need very strong fundamentals to do them well. A few things to practice are:

Generating momentum while standing on one leg. Start at a standstill, and use your hips and upper body to generate speed and go forwards. Do the same for going backwards as well.

One-footed skating in general. Make sure your posture is correct, and that you are always in complete control. One-footed backwards skating is something that is often overlooked and underestimated by beginner-intermediate slalomers. Most can do the trick, but few can do it well, so make sure to practice it until you're able to start, stop, and turn without any problems.

Back nelson, forwards one-foot, backwards one-foot are the three tricks you really need a good handle on for shifts. Learning rekil, footspin, and chicken leg would also help, but those aren't necessarily easier to learn than shifts.
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Old January 15th, 2015, 01:23 PM   #10
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Thank you so much!!! I was looking up those last three things and found this...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DCQ-s0M0qAU

Is that the chicken leg??? I just tried it and it's SO great, because you have the momentum already! Sooo fun!

I always get over my head and end up with a list of 20 things I want to learn at once, but never had so much fun on one little trick. Thanks again. So for now, I'm just gonna work on that new combo I've been learning and that chicken leg in the video above.

Then I'll move onto the other stuff. THANKS!
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Old January 15th, 2015, 04:34 PM   #11
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In the US, we often call that Chicken Toe, as opposed to Chicken foot, which is the same trick, but flat-footed.

I think Chicken Toe a beautiful trick, but not particularly easy. You probably want to have your toe wheeling down OK and also good upper-body control for stuff like J-turn (where you keep the body and head steady instead of having parts progressively lead or lag the trick) before spending serious time learning this one.

If you are just starting learning this, I think the first part of the Sun is a great entry into Chicken toe. Cross cone 1 with the same foot you want to wheel on. Your other foot (the one that will be lifted) goes around cone 2 and then crosses your body as with a j-turn or Screw. As your weight falls to your other foot in this process, you lift the crossing foot, and go up on your toe on the planted foot, using the momentum of the weight shift to drive your toe wheel around the cone. Don't try to get momentum by flinging your body around, as that will cause your upper body to lead the trick, which will end it's execution quickly.

Cool thing about the trick is the same basic steps can be used to do a standing (one-cone) screw. Just don't lift the crossing foot during j-turn entry, but cross the legs and go up on both toes. As with Chicken Toe, solid upper-body position is key. Keep the arms balanced, chest up, and torso solid. You might have better control if you look straight forward while spinning instead of down at the cone, as dipping your chin will also lower your chest and compromise balance.

good luck!
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Old January 15th, 2015, 04:35 PM   #12
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Wow, that was a crap description. Would need to put on some skates and think about it a bit to be more clear. Sorry.
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Old January 18th, 2015, 06:53 AM   #13
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testing...
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Old January 18th, 2015, 07:39 AM   #14
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Okay, that worked. Don't ask. Bwahhhaahhhaa...

Anyhoo...I get it (I mean the description). Only I start with a nelson, into a sun. Yes, trying to explain is difficult. What I like about the chicken toe is that it feels so natural. It's infectious. And really impressive, but I've only done it freestyle and not through cones yet- I'm sure that will be a different experience (like wheeling, yeah the bane of my existence- do we even need to mention that thread?)

Since that thread I took everyone's advice and have been working on foundation tricks. Mainly learning them on my weak side (and thinking I was wasting my time). I was seriously wrong. If you're new to slalom and are reading this PLEASE NOTE: Learning your weak side is really important (I see that now). It will open up a new world.

As soon as I started working my weak side I realized I could do a one footed shift coming out of a sun. It had nothing to do with my weak side, but for some reason it just worked out that way. Wierd right? So now I'll try flat chicken foot and J-turn. I just really hope they are not like the cobra or the brush. I hate those more than wheeling. Are cobra and brush foundation moves? Should I start trying to wheel again? Is that something I should even play around with? Do all roads lead to wheeling??? Ughhh!
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Old January 20th, 2015, 12:31 AM   #15
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Back nelson -> sun -> trick is actually a very common transition move, I see a number of people use it for sevens, chicken foots, seat belts, etc.

One-footed shifts being easier on your weak side isn't really weird either. Most slalom skaters are stronger with their weak side for backwards skating because that's the foot that they use for the standard back nelson. When I first learned shifts I did them with my weak side as well, although I did eventually learn the other side as well(because left-footed wheeling wasn't happening anytime soon).

Cobra and brush aren't really foundation moves. Cobra is a trick that's really more dependent on your flexibility than your skating ability, and brush can be considered an extension of j-turns/swans.

All roads do eventually lead to wheeling tricks, but for the vast majority of US slalom skaters (I'd even argue all) they still have quite a ways to go before they even come close to exhausting non-wheeling tricks. Aside from flat chicken foot and j-turn, there are also swans/screws/reverse j-turns and a myriad of variations on those, rekils, footspins, total cross, x-back, fan volte, sweep/drift, the whole windmill family of tricks (aka seatbelt or baek ban), a number of other one-footed spins, footguns/kasatchok, etc. If you really want to delve into difficulty, there are also things like one-footed brush, spinning footguns, in-cone slides, etc.

Aside from tricks, there are also as many transitions as your creativity and skill will allow to learn and become familiar with. You can start to learn these transitions simply from watching and emulating videos, and eventually you'll find that it isn't really difficult to start making up your own.
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Old January 21st, 2015, 05:10 PM   #16
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The only way to learn wheeling is to actually practice it. I feel that even if you can get all the flat foot tricks down, you will still need to develop your own feel to where to put your weight when wheeling both toe or heel. The pace which you develop your wheeling skill would be dependent on how proficient you are on skates overall (which links to how well you feel about your non-wheeling tricks).

Start anytime, and even if you start wheeling now you can only get better over time

To answer your question about cobra and brush:

I would not consider either of them a foundation trick. Cobra in particular is a flexibility trick with a quite restricted number of entries and exits. Tricks such as Nelson, snake, sun, one-foots have the potential to link into a wide variety of other tricks which is not the case with cobra.

I have not seen brush used enough (nor do I use it often enough) to figure out other links.

That being said, if you are able to learn either of these tricks, you should try to do so anyways since a larger trick arsenal is always a good thing

About learning on your weak side:

It is definitely good practice to learn on your weak side. When you watch videos of Guo Fang doing perfect rides/seatbelts on either feet, it really demonstrates the versatility of always being able to link whatever trick you want without needing to set up a prior trick to change your body position.

I feel the most important weak side trick to learn is Back Nelson. Typically when you learn Nelson, your dominant foot is leading the one foot, and when you learn Back Nelson the same direction is encouraged (dominant foot kicking) because you can link both Nelsons into a trick called Mega. (Other reasons why this direction of Back Nelson is encouraged includes learning Mexican). The Back Nelson on your weak side is one of the easiest entries that can link into more technical tricks on your dominant foot
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Old April 5th, 2015, 10:05 AM   #17
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I just want to tell you guys how helpful this thread and ALL THE LINKS (many links) have been to my skating. I've made SO MUCH PROGRESS! I'm now able to spin like a ballerina (or sort of a drunken ballerina) on one foot.

The ice skating lessons are teaching me to control my upper body, so progress is moving fast now. Still SO MUCH to learn, but thanks.
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Old April 26th, 2015, 01:48 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oicusk82huh View Post
I just really hope they are not like the cobra or the brush. I hate those more than wheeling
It's interesting how differently people feel about moves. Cobra and (Backwards) Brush happen to be two of my favourite moves.
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