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Quad Roller Skating Forum Discussions about quad roller skates and any other quad skating discussions that do not seem appropriate for one of our other forums.

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Old June 26th, 2018, 04:06 AM   #21
campingnut
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Thanks for all the thoughts...I picked up my new skates today and am wearing them with the thinnest pair of socks I own. I tried to post a pic, but I do not think I can make attachments yet...
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Old June 26th, 2018, 11:18 AM   #22
ursle
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I like to wear the thinnest smart-wool socks, they last forever and are warm when wet.
Skatelog doesn't host pictures, postimiage.org works, photobucked started charging so they no longer work.

https://postimages.org/

Again, take it slow breaking in new leather, if you blister or bruise, healing will lengthen the process.
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Old June 26th, 2018, 10:23 PM   #23
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We are doing some shopping this week, so I will see if I can find a thin pair of wool socks to try.

Another question...how do I make sure my wheels are tightened correctly? When I brought the skates home yesterday they had the smallest amount of play (side to side), but they were not binding...is that a good tightness? How often should I check?
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Old June 26th, 2018, 10:29 PM   #24
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Thanks for the post image thingy...here I am last night with my new skates!

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Old June 27th, 2018, 07:21 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by campingnut View Post
We are doing some shopping this week, so I will see if I can find a thin pair of wool socks to try.

Another question...how do I make sure my wheels are tightened correctly? When I brought the skates home yesterday they had the smallest amount of play (side to side), but they were not binding...is that a good tightness? How often should I check?
Lateral play is fine. Just keep it to a minimum, about 1/8th 1/16th of an inch. If you remove the play without a proper spacer setup, you will throw the bearings inner races out of alignment.

The nuts should not back off. They have a nylon ring in them that grabs the axle thread. More commonly known as nylock nuts.

You should inspect your skates every time you skate, before/after.
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Old June 27th, 2018, 02:27 PM   #26
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Any ultra thin sock will work, I like wool, at times on a bicycle, the ability to hold heat when wet works out, but silk or poly also work well, anything but cotton.

Just like bicycle and car wheels, you turn down the adjusting nut until it"s tight, then back it off 1/2 turn +-, with the nyloc nut the adjustment is permanent, but do clean the bearing of grime and dust each use.

With bearing spacers you lock the nut down, you don't back it off, but nobody but possibly figures, figure skaters use them anymore, the nyloc nut made them obsolete.

Think about hard orthotics under foot, they don't take up space and they hold your weight evenly, no pressure spots, no curled toes, no heel slide, better balance.
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Old June 29th, 2018, 06:50 AM   #27
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I bought a pair of thin wool/blend socks and took my new skates out today for the first time (my first time skating outside as well). My first thoughts are: I love these skates and they are not even broken in yet. The wheels did an amazing job going over cracks and small rocks. Wow, skating outside is twice as hard as inside, but super fun!
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Old June 29th, 2018, 07:00 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by ursle View Post
...but do clean the bearing of grime and dust each use.
Are you saying:
1. Wipe the outside of the bearing while still on the skate.
2. Take the wheels off and wipe both sets of bearings.
3. Or remove the bearings from the wheels and clean/oil the races.

Iím asking because Iím into RC racing and we can be a little neurotic about cleaning and oiling our bearings...I have the tools to clean the bearings, but I thought these bearings would not need to be cleaned nearly as often as my RC cars; they are racing in the dirt at high speeds, so they need to be cleaned often.
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Old June 29th, 2018, 05:32 PM   #29
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The outside of the bearings, periodically cleaning and lubing the bearings.

I only skate outdoors, the dust is continual.
BTW, you want outdoor wheels to have a 78-84 durometer so they roll over stuff instead of stopping.
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Old June 30th, 2018, 03:01 AM   #30
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I am using these for outdoors...

https://www.skates.com/Rollerbones-V...iami6580x8.htm

They have a durometer of 78a. I’m not sure what the “a” means, but they are 78. Only one day on them so far, but they roll over stuff well.
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Old July 15th, 2018, 07:21 PM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mort View Post
My boot is full grain leather BTW (before they just went to using top grain)



The whole "support" is kind of misleading as it's not really support, but restriction.

When you begin to immobilize a joint, you increase the stress to other areas when something would go wrong. A joint will not gain strength, however after some time skating your muscles will know what range of movement is normal, and what is not. Flexibility is essential to reduce joint damage when a fall, slip, or unwanted/extreme movement happens. People mistake strength with coordination most often when talking about joints. Once your muscle groups are conditioned well they(ankles) will feel stronger.

Eventually you can run things looser such as suspension, for easier movement and make the skate carve with less effot. This can make it easier to skate for longer periods of time

Lacing lower will help free up your range of motion, but in the same turn your body will need to be ready for the increased range of motion. You essentially need muscle control in the ranges of motion skating uses. That control makes that stability you want. The more range of movement in the knees and ankles from lacing lower, the better you will be able to rock your knees left or right of the plate to gain leverage over the suspension. Stance is part of that as well. Lowering your ride height by bending the ankles, knees, and being bent over very slightly at the hips helps have the body coiled up to be able to make a move. A straight body cannot push. Think of a kid slouching when they give a parent attitude , like that "I don't wanna! " as they drop their height a few inches


Oils and/or lotions are going to usually cause slip, and make your feet slide around inside to your boots or socks. Ideally you want maximum friction, as in, no slip what so ever. The goal is to have a boot become a second skin. There should be enough padding to flex slightly, without causing a slip between your foot and the sock, or the sock and the boots. I disagree with lotions put on before or for during your time skating. The feedback won't be consistent.

Socks... what they are made out of is not nearly as important as a tight fitting sock. Some forum members will recommend rather expensive socks, or certain wicking docs, bunch of bs really. I personally wear regular old padded cotton crew socks from Wal-Mart. Works great. But knowing why is key. I have a size 11.5 to 12 foot. This means the sock is at its upper end of the foot it was made to fit, which for men's socks is size 6 to 12. So there is virtually no way it can bunch up. Many of the "athletic" wicking socks I have tried are horrible. Their friction between the sock and the boot is poor, and feels like my foot is slipping in the skate, which makes me try to dig into the boots some with my toes to keep traction. This can cause foot cramping, or mess with the confidence you have in your skates since your feet wont feel secure. Don't do what I do though,, do what works for you.

Also socks change the volume of your foot. If your feet are different sizes, one foot may feel better with a very thin sock, while the other feels/fits best with a more padded sock. So tight fitting sock, and use the appropriate thickness to augment for your best fit.

In the end, it all comes down to how you want that skate to feel. Thinner socks will result in more feedback, thicker socks, less chance of blisters usually if they fit right, but can Darden the feedback a little, or make the skate feel slightly slower to react.
These are some very good points, observations. Good advice I think.

To the OP: In skating you will realize sooner or later every option, modification or choice of hardware is a tradeoff. You get something, you lose something, in some cases it's only money.

The advice I would give you is not broad. Some choices will have a profound impact on your enjoyment of the sport. At 300 lbs you WILL need a good quality skate. Expect to pay a minimum of $300.00 and more like $400.00. to start. Otherwise your likely to be uncomfortable, disappointed and just quit the sport. You are not too heavy, you can have fun and lose weight, and you WILL! But at your weight good quality skates are a must!

If you stay with metal plates, real leather and a respected names like Riedell, suregrip, etc. you will not go far wrong. You will see many "deals" on skates, but understand no one sells good skates cheap. But many of them are very "good looking.

In other words don't get lost in all these details, QUALITY is going to be by far the biggest factor for you.
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Last edited by netplaceus; July 20th, 2018 at 08:48 PM.
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