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Old January 13th, 2010, 11:54 PM   #21
Dec8rSk8r
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fall Down Go Boom View Post
Would you avoid a roller rink just because it had a cement floor?
It depends, if there was a nearby one with a good wooden floor, that's the one that would get my business. If that was the only rink nearby, I could skate on it.
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Old January 14th, 2010, 02:05 AM   #22
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I think I would look at the overall package. The floor, condition of the floor, atmosphere, etc. A cement floor doesn't bother me a bit as long as it is well cared for.
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Old January 14th, 2010, 02:26 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Malcom View Post
Curious as to what the other 2 are??
For the other priorities it would the music. I have been at rinks where you can't here the sound system at all in places. And others where it sounds like all of the speakers are blown. Also getting a broad selection of genres.

The other would be the rental skates. Broken laces get on my nerves and I have even had one boot that was taller than the other. Obviously different brands. Bad wheels... one toe stop missing... A lot of issues with rentals.
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Old January 14th, 2010, 03:55 AM   #24
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Default No, You don't need concrete underneath

Hi sk82,

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Originally Posted by sk82day View Post
Its actually quite simple. You need a concrete base to lay a wood floor on correct? So if you are building from scratch spend a little more and have the floor laser leveled, seal it, coat it, and skate. You can ALWAYS add a new $175,000-200,000 12,000 sq ft new wood floor over that concrete later.
Although I have seen what you have wrote, the floor I skated in Michigan had a peculiar to me construction with one part over a lake. There was no concrete in the construction of both floors.

Yours in Skating, MA/NY Skating Dave
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Old January 14th, 2010, 04:02 AM   #25
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Default Don't Know Houston

Hi Fall Down,

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Originally Posted by Fall Down Go Boom View Post
That's exactly what I was thinking. But I didn't want to give my future patrons a bad taste in their mouths for my rink because the first thing they see is a concrete floor. o - o - o .
I don't know Houston. If all the good floors in your region are wood and they have all the good skaters THEN you have a marketing problem. You can overcome it by starting an artistic club and other stuff.

Visit all the floors in your area and all the art clubs.

We have learned over the years that skating is quite often local. Anyway a thought...

Yours in Skating, MA/NY Skating Dave
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Old February 3rd, 2010, 07:02 PM   #26
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Default The maple floor

Hello everyone! I'm really new here. I have a lot of questions about the skating rink building, especially the floor. I'm really interested to know why is the maple floor the best to use and what if I want to use the ash-tree floor for example, is there anyone who can help me with the answer?
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Old February 4th, 2010, 03:08 AM   #27
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As for the original question...I skated plenty on concrete, asphalt, etc. as a kid outside. One rink nearby does have a concrete floor, though I've never been to that rink.

As for me, I'm with the others, I wouldn't NOT skate on a concrete floor, even if it has been a while, though I do prefer wood since it's what I'm used to.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fall Down Go Boom View Post
The other would be the rental skates. Broken laces get on my nerves and I have even had one boot that was taller than the other. Obviously different brands. Bad wheels... one toe stop missing... A lot of issues with rentals.
A lot of times, stuff like that happens because the people running a rink either don't care, don't have the cash to invest back into the rink, and/or just plain don't know.

"My" Rink:
Broken laces & Toe Stop Issues: If someone returns a skate saying "This lace is broken" or pointing out a missing toe stop, it's changed immediately and they use the same skates, if the person wants to wait for the change (most usually do, though a handful will just get a new pair so they get get on the floor).

However, the 16 yr. old behind the counter doesn't even look if you simply say "I need a different pair"...he just grabs another pair (often a different size) until you get the right fit.

One Boot Taller: The boots are put in storage, another pair is given out...in the back, the boots eventually find their original mates.

And of course, FIT - and I mean all areas - if something doesn't feel right, skating isn't as fun.

A size 6 shoe doesn't *always* translate into a size 6 skate, and everyone has one foot that's bigger than the other, usually a fraction of a millimeter, but to some, that cane make a difference. We are NOT perfectly symmetrical, so you may have to be prepared for those who are...how to put this..."more out of proportion than others"? LOL

Trucks that are too loose or too tight can be easily adjusted for free.

If something else feels loose (a wheel about to fall off, toe stop coming out), again, offer a free fix, unless the bolt is stripped on the toe stop/plug...then change them, if the stripping has occured IN the skate plate, you'll need to get rid of the skates or change the plates.

Bottom line: You can't fix something/help if you don't know what's wrong. Encourage your customers (when you get that far) to let you know if anything is wrong with the skate so you can take care of it. Also, have a few extra parts on hand for those times when something breaks. No need to go hog wild and have every bit possible for every single pair of skates that come in the rink, but breakdowns WILL happen...eventually. On that note, be sure to have the proper tools as well (and know the correct term for each part of the skate) for any repairs that may be needed. That last thing I'd want to see is some "professional" digging out a bearing with a screwdriver or tightening the plate when I said the king pin was loose.

Only the truly dedicated skaters, like many of us here, actually have our own spare parts and tools.
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Old February 21st, 2010, 01:10 PM   #28
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In my area we have high humidity and a chance of flood if a major hurricane hits us, so in short Concrete is a better option. Maple is so hard to maintain down here.
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Old February 25th, 2010, 08:56 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fall Down Go Boom View Post
Would you avoid a roller rink just because it had a cement floor? All the rinks that I have skated at (indoors) have had wood floors but I was wondering how the skating community felt about cement ones.

I am looking into running a roller rink and comparing the installation and upkeep of the different floor types. I am still at least a year or more out from realizing this dream. I have a lot of research to do and understanding of the business end of rink ownership before taking the plunge.

My theory is that I would upgrade to a wood floor at a later date. Of course, I will need to investigate this to make sure it will cost less in the long run. If just going to a wood floor is more cost-effective, I'll go that route. But, I thought it was still an interesting question and knowing more about how skaters feel about skating can never hurt!
Where are you at in Houston? I live on the north side but have skated most of the rinks in the area. I, by far, like Champion Skate which is run by the Hedrick family. It has a beautiful wood floor and it is obviously run by people who enjoy skating. They do a tremendous business on Friday, Sat and Sun and I would look to them as a model. I actually returned to skating last year as a result of doing the same kind of research you are presently doing. Remember that location is everything and making the place safe is of utmost importance.
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Old February 26th, 2010, 04:20 PM   #30
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Hanger18,

You said that you were doing the same type of research, are you looking into opening a rink?

I'm in west houston and have only been visiting the rinks that are close by. the rink you're talking about is about an hour away. In the photos on their website it looks like very nicely maintained establishment. Is it fairly new? I see that they have a few screens hanging from the ceiling. I will try and stop by this weekend and probably bring a couple of my kids with me.

I am interested in being able to attract an older crowd also so I'll try and make a visit on a Thursday night to see what it's like. I saw your other thread about Thursday nights but I have really cheap skates so I'm not taking a picture of them .
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Old December 19th, 2016, 01:44 PM   #31
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[I have skated on Cement floors traza, marble floors---which do I prefer the ones that are maintained in a high quality by the owners!!QUOTE=Fall Down Go Boom;352565]Would you avoid a roller rink just because it had a cement floor? All the rinks that I have skated at (indoors) have had wood floors but I was wondering how the skating community felt about cement ones.

I am looking into running a roller rink and comparing the installation and upkeep of the different floor types. I am still at least a year or more out from realizing this dream. I have a lot of research to do and understanding of the business end of rink ownership before taking the plunge.

My theory is that I would upgrade to a wood floor at a later date. Of course, I will need to investigate this to make sure it will cost less in the long run. If just going to a wood floor is more cost-effective, I'll go that route. But, I thought it was still an interesting question and knowing more about how skaters feel about skating can never hurt! [/QUOTE]
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Old December 20th, 2016, 01:24 AM   #32
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There is a variety of floors in the Houston area.
1. Sport court sux! Bear Creek
2. rough wood sux! Katy
3. Small floors sux! Humble, but very sticky!
4. Smooth wood floors are nice, Almeda and Brenham, Silverwings
5. Coated cement can be good(earlier version of Bear Creek and another rink out of business now. Also a rink in the Lufkin area long ago). The Bear Creek rink was originally cement, but was very wavy.
6. Wavy wood floors not good either, another Lufkin rink. Medium grip.
7. Well coated smooth wood floors feel the best(Champions), some floors also have cushioning under the wood(Champs in Lexington KY).
8. Well coated smooth cement is fastest but also give the most feedback to the skaters as it has not give at all.

The wood floors give a little and are easier on figure skaters and derby skaters by being softer than cement. Cement gives the best roll by far. Some rinks even though they are making money, will take it all out and not put any in. Dirty floors, dirty concession area, no floor coating, dirty bathrooms etc.

IMO The best floors to skate on in the Houston and surrounding areas are #1 Champions, #2 Rainbow in conroe, #3 Almeda Houston, #4 Brenham(very smooth wood floor but no floor coat, medium traction).
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Old December 20th, 2016, 08:09 PM   #33
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I know this is an old thread but I just want to say I'll take a nice coated cement floor over wood.
Wood is cool, and classic when it is kept up - but I can skate much longer on coated cement, coated wood and finished parquet wood wear me out.
If I was only doing slow dance moves for an hour wood would be great.
But with all this great music (and old school disco and R&B) we have to skate faster!
And I know - different wheels for different floors.
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Old December 20th, 2016, 08:57 PM   #34
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You all are making me want to skate a smooth, coated cement floor... All I have in my area is wood, rough cement, and sport court. But I do quite like the wood floor, tight when recently finished, and you can get some nice slides in when the coating starts to wear off.
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Old December 20th, 2016, 10:33 PM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Altpensacola View Post
I know this is an old thread but I just want to say I'll take a nice coated cement floor over wood.
Wood is cool, and classic when it is kept up - but I can skate much longer on coated cement, coated wood and finished parquet wood wear me out.
If I was only doing slow dance moves for an hour wood would be great.
But with all this great music (and old school disco and R&B) we have to skate faster!
And I know - different wheels for different floors.
A very smooth, not wavy cement floor is very fast to skate on better if it is coated well. The wood floor in Lexington ky has so much padding under the wood that it is one of the slowest floors I ever skated.
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Old December 23rd, 2016, 07:09 PM   #36
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I usually skate wooden, with the occasional coated concrete. The concrete is definitely smooth and quiet.

Recently skated terrazzo, and it seemed much harder than the concrete. I could feel it in all my joints by the end of the night.
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Old August 11th, 2017, 08:59 PM   #37
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I know this is an old post but I just wanted to thank everyone for the good info posted in this one..
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Old August 14th, 2017, 01:59 PM   #38
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Summary - Skaters will drive long distance to a good maintained wood floor.
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Old August 14th, 2017, 10:02 PM   #39
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Hi SSpinball,

Quote:
Summary - Skaters will drive long distance to a good maintained wood floor.
YEP !! I do 70 mile round trip, twice a week to get to the WINNWOOD Rink with a Clear Coated Rotunda Maple Floor. Biggest and Bestest in KC, out of 8 Rinks in area.

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Old August 15th, 2017, 05:39 AM   #40
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I don't want to sound like a total jerk, but I won't go to rinks with cement floors, unless there is no other rink within 80miles.

I live in an area with many options, so I can be really picky about where I'll spend my cash. I will not go to a sport-court, or a cement floor. I totally don't want to hurt your dream, and I wish you the best! It looks like most folks are more open minded.

(ohhhhh, I just realized how old this post was.....what ever happened?)
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