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Fitness Skating and Training Forum Discussions about on-skate and off-skate training, hydration, sports nutrition, weight loss, injuries, sports medicine, and other topics related to training and physical fitness for skaters.

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Old September 12th, 2013, 12:06 PM   #21
Armadillo
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Also, when the front wheel of an inline would go into a gap, it won't drop because of the weight distribution. On the back-forward dimension of quads, you only have two points of contact, which means they will always conform to the terrain. On an inline, you have at least three (and usually 4). If one stops making contact with the ground, the others will take on the extra weight.
YES! This is the most critical reason quads are less outdoor safe - ONLY TWO AXLES. Any downward outdoor surface imperfection that the front axle wheels hit means front wheel(s) are going to instantly DROP DOWN into that crack, pocket, hole, since remaining axle alone can't prevent tipping forward, as inlines can.

This tipping forward can cause the dropped wheel become somewhat pinned into the crack, pocket, hole ... which causes further breaking effect, which causes more tipping forward to further aggravate stuck wheel issue.

This can be come a runaway effect that throws the skater forward onto the ground.

Quad setups can be optimized to minimize this effect by having front axles as far forward as possible (see avatar PIC skate), large 70-76mm wheels, softer suspensions, shallower action angles, etc...
However they will never perform as safely as inlines outside. Different outdoor technique that keeps more of your weight on the rear axle by about a 60-40% ratio also helps a lot.


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Another thing is the wheel base. A wider base it more stable. What I am talking about here is not the wheel base of a single skate; it is the wheel base of the skater. Very few people remain on one foot when they start to lose their balance. Between quads and inlines, you have a shorter wheel base side to side on inlines, but your feet are already shoulder width apart. The extra few inches don't mean much. On the other hand, you gain several inches back-to-front, which makes a pretty big difference since the wheel base in that direction is relatively small.
This lateral wheelbase info is really not so useful once you can skate.
Proper skating, outdoors is 90+% on one foot at a time, NOT both feet down. Skating with two skates down, each below shoulders is ONLY for absolute beginners who cannot balance on one foot. Proper skating technique will have you landing your next single foot down placement under the weight focus coming down from the CENTER of your body, not under your shoulder. Maintaining balance rolling on one foot at a time demands it is never placed down on the rolling surface under the shoulder.


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Old September 12th, 2013, 12:24 PM   #22
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This lateral wheelbase info is really not so useful once you can skate.
Proper skating, outdoors is 90+% on one foot at a time, NOT both feet down. Skating with two skates down, each below shoulders is ONLY for absolute beginners who cannot balance on one foot. Proper skating technique will have you landing your next single foot down placement under the weight focus coming down from the CENTER of your body, not under your shoulder. Maintaining balance rolling on one foot at a time demands it is never placed down on the rolling surface under the shoulder.

Ludicrous, what percentage of outdoor skaters "race" on quads

.0000000000001

'Do, yer dreaming, again, skating fast in a straight line is the most boring thing to do, ever, try to open the mind up enough to involve the rest of the planets population, I know, you never have before, but try
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Old September 12th, 2013, 03:18 PM   #23
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Ludicrous, what percentage of outdoor skaters "race" on quads

.0000000000001

'Do, yer dreaming, again, skating fast in a straight line is the most boring thing to do, ever, try to open the mind up enough to involve the rest of the planets population, I know, you never have before, but try
Who said anything about racing?

Getting fit from trail skating outdoors requires skating at a decent level of speed. Skating at decent speed outdoors requires ONE FOOT down at a time, steady stroke skating for 90% of the time (coasting downhill or resting time excluded).

Good derby jam skaters are mostly skating with just one foot down at a time too. In fact, the best way to improve your skating balance is to maximize the amount of your skating time that you do with only one foot down.

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Old September 12th, 2013, 03:42 PM   #24
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Skating at decent speed outdoors requires ONE FOOT down at a time, steady stroke skating for 90% of the time (coasting downhill or resting time excluded).
One foot pushing, yes. One foot down, no. Recovery time is less than stroke time, especially if you do a double push. You might be able to convince me that you are on one foot 50% of the time, but 90% is extreme. Also, most falls happen when you go over obstacles or lose your balance for another reason. When you see dangerous obstacles or start to lose your balance, your natural reaction is to put down both feet and stop pushing until you are stable again. So you are on two feet during the most vulnerable times, even if you are on one foot during a significant part of normal cruising.
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Old September 12th, 2013, 05:00 PM   #25
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NOT both feet down. Skating with two skates down, each below shoulders is ONLY for absolute beginners who cannot balance on one foot.

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Who said anything about racing?
You skate like that all the time, to bad

Anyway your opinion isn't going to be changing, just letting anyone paying attention, know that the log isn't really inept, just some opinions might be
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Old September 12th, 2013, 07:34 PM   #26
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Bonus points for 180'ing the railroad tracks, and potholes get the full 360!
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Old September 12th, 2013, 09:10 PM   #27
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I've watched some videos of outdoor skaters, and I'll man up. I was wrong. Skaters spend more time on one foot than I realized. However, I still want to clear up some points.

I meant the shoulder width as a minimum base. Obviously when you push to the side, the base increases. That only enhances my point about the extra few inches on quads not adding much stability.

While you may be on one foot, your weight is offset. You are essentially in a very slow controlled fall on to your other foot. In the case that something jolts you or puts you off balance, you fall on to that other foot, and you have a nice wide base until you are comfortable striding again. Since the size of the base only comes in to play in moments of instability, the point stands. When you are off balance, you have a stance at least as wide as your shoulders, so the extra couple of inches quads will give you mean very little. The extra inches front to back do mean something. When you are recovering from an off balance moment, inlines give you a bigger base.
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