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Old January 15th, 2011, 08:54 PM   #101
DeezUU
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kay View Post
Actually, fat people are LESS likely to break bones....
the silver lining to those extra pounds I've been carrying around!!
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Old January 15th, 2011, 10:36 PM   #102
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Hi Kay & DeezUU,

Quote:
Actually, fat people are LESS likely to break bones. Our bones tend to be denser. So don't worry!
Quote:
the silver lining to those extra pounds I've been carrying around!!
As to the "weight" issue, my observation has been that the "weightier" folks tend to sprain or break wrists, and sprain or break ankles easier, not to mention elbos. At least that's what I've seen over the years.

As to what effects their falling on top of the little kids has - well, it's simply more dangerous to them.

Us larger, and those weightier, folks have to be a bit more carefull skating - both for our own, and for other's safety.

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Old January 15th, 2011, 11:40 PM   #103
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I wont leave the house without a helmet when riding/skating.

The last thing I want to have happen is for me to be involved in n accident and sustain a preventable injury to my head.
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Old January 16th, 2011, 12:51 AM   #104
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...As to the "weight" issue, my observation has been that the "weightier" folks tend to sprain or break wrists, and sprain or break ankles easier, not to mention elbos. At least that's what I've seen over the years.
i don;t really know if overweight folks break more easily, but after my recent experience with a torn rotator cuff injury and resulting surgery, i do know that fit, in shape people have a much better prognosis for recovering from tissue damage injuries and surgeries like mine. As it was explained to me, there's the issue of quality of your tissue and muscles, and surgeons will take healthy fit people anyday to ones that have let their mass degrade. Sounds a bit callous, but i can tell you, the vibe i was getting from the surgeon and the nurses was none too subtle, and almost creepy. I get the feeling they've been around this so much, they aren't that great at hiding how they really feel, and it comes across.
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Old January 16th, 2011, 01:25 AM   #105
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Sounds a bit callous, but i can tell you, the vibe i was getting from the surgeon and the nurses was none too subtle, and almost creepy. I get the feeling they've been around this so much, they aren't that great at hiding how they really feel, and it comes across.
I didn't pick up on creepiness, but when I went in for foot surgery, there was this general feeling of happiness and delight at having a fit, healthy patient to work on.

Heavy people may be less likely to bruise a tailbone, but they are more likely to break a wrist, at least based on the stories around here.
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Old January 16th, 2011, 02:09 AM   #106
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I always look out for the young ones... but inconsiderate jam skaters get NO MERCY!!! Lol.

On the real, though... one of the reasons I started sk8ng again was for the exercise and getting off me arse!! And although I don't currently pad up, I will be getting wrist guards at a minimum in the near future.
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Old January 16th, 2011, 03:22 AM   #107
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I didn't pick up on creepiness, but when I went in for foot surgery, there was this general feeling of happiness and delight at having a fit, healthy patient to work on...
Yeah, definitely that. But creepiness is the wrong word. It was a slight note of excitement about tearing into some healthy tissue that wasn't about to fall apart on its own accord. To me, that's creepy.
The other thing i remember - when they put me out, i had a little phase there where i think i was out, then slightly conscious, etc. I remember hearing a discussion about my heart rate, which apparently was 34, and one of them was asking if it could be "sustained". That's a few beats lower than i'm used to seeing on the HRM, but an NP aquaintance says it was undoubtedly several bpm lower than usual because i was almost sleeping.
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Old January 16th, 2011, 09:40 AM   #108
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Heavy people do not have denser bones. You may be mistaking a heavy boned person, or many heavy boned people that you may know, who also happen to be heavy in weight and making a generalization. I am a thin boned male and weigh 195 at 49 years of age and 180 would probably be a better weight for my build. My bones would not be thicker or stronger if I were 225. I would just be heavier and fall harder on my thin bone structure. More weight = harder impact. More weight also means, with some exceptions, the person is more like to be out of shape. So again, extra weight is not a good thing.

I did not work out the over-weight comment in my head. It is what I saw at a rink many times. Less active folks with a good amount of extra weight go skating and take a hard fall and they are done. Me being reasonably close to my "correct" weight and being regularly active are not at quite as much risk. It still HURTS, and has caused some minor injuries, but has not caused the hurts I saw some of the heavy weights get. I mean people with probably at least 70-80 pounds extra. (there were just a lot of heavier people that frequented that now closed rink. And there were those well over a hundred pounds overweight.)

I remember one lady, short and very round. 50-60 pounds overweight, but was skating better than I was at the time. Basically a very good skater, but heavy. A kid cut her off and she could not quite avoid him. She fell, not on the kid, and hit her tail bone. No ambulance came, but her friends took her out right away. A hospital with emergency room was only about 300 yards away. I remember distinctly because I could not believe how well she skated for her size. I mean, I should wear pads now, even though I seldom fall. But if I were overweight, man, I would really wear it all the time.
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Old January 16th, 2011, 10:18 AM   #109
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Yeah, definitely that. But creepiness is the wrong word. It was a slight note of excitement about tearing into some healthy tissue that wasn't about to fall apart on its own accord. To me, that's creepy.
Ha, yeah, I can imagine. Plus not having to put retractors on layers of fat...

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The other thing i remember - when they put me out, i had a little phase there where i think i was out, then slightly conscious, etc. I remember hearing a discussion about my heart rate, which apparently was 34, and one of them was asking if it could be "sustained". That's a few beats lower than i'm used to seeing on the HRM, but an NP aquaintance says it was undoubtedly several bpm lower than usual because i was almost sleeping.
If you tried to take a patient's pulse and there was a pause for over a second without a heatbeat, that would be pretty exciting. "Umm, is he alive?" They probably don't see a 34 very often. That is crazy low...
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Old January 16th, 2011, 10:28 AM   #110
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I doubt that overweight people are less likely to break bones than anyone else. I'm guessing people think that because they have more body fat, then it's harder to break bones, because the bones are more protected. But isn't it more to do with overall impact of the fall? Skinny people have less meat on them, therefore you presume they'd break bones more easily. But someone who is 55kgs and skinny, and someone who is say 85kgs and more "padded", if both fell I think they'd have equal chance of breaking bones due to the weight behind them. So a 55kg fall on someone who is skinny, and a 85kg fall on someone who is a bit meatier, probably would have the same effect, due to the force of the fall compared to body mass? If that makes sense.
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Old January 16th, 2011, 12:05 PM   #111
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I'm 45lbs over.... fell on my rear quarter last Sat... still hurts like a mother! Natural padding wasn't that effective (althought I've been told I have no butt)
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Old January 16th, 2011, 03:39 PM   #112
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Default Weight verses bones..

Generally some people will have larger bones than others. People that work out or weight lift most likely have larger bones. IN general though I would think that larger people of the same height overload their bones with weight. So the bones take a beating if something goes wrong. Sorta like a bridge, only designed for so much load capacity. If it is overloaded, bad things happen under similar circumstances...
I went to the doctor last year and there were comments about a good heart rate. The nurses like that kind of stuff. And went as far as to ask what I did for working out.
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Old January 21st, 2011, 02:46 PM   #113
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What online inline said is pretty much right on.

The supposed 'cushioning' effect of fat layers is more than offset by the extra weight added to the impact, plus, overweight people are MUCH less likely to fall properly, and tend to recover much more slowly.

Bone density is primarily in your genes, slight variations may be achieved by extensive weight bearing exercises growing up.
In general, people of sub-saharan African origin tend to have denser bones than those of other races, with Northern Europeans and East Asians having the lowest bone density.
Many variations do, of course, exist within the spectrum.
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Old January 22nd, 2011, 08:05 PM   #114
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Have to agree with sound advice given especially by the very experienced SKATERDOG.
I only started learning 20 months ago, both ice & rollerblades.
After a fall on ice caused by a wanabee hockey ace crossing me at 90 degrees going backward, I can assure you all, that as a seventy year old sitting in the hostpital A & E with blood pouring down my head I sure didn`t feel cool.
To add to the indignity the hostpital was Gosport War Memorial and the Doc. who stiched me was a marine captain who nearly died laughing after he asked "how did I do it ?"
A ski helmet and all the pads from then on, both on ice and road has saved me further head injury on 3 other occasions plus a number of lesser injuries while learning.
I`m now reasonably proficient and tend to stay on my blades. But will not glide without my parachutes.
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Old January 22nd, 2011, 10:41 PM   #115
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In general, people of sub-saharan African origin tend to have denser bones than those of other races, with Northern Europeans and East Asians having the lowest bone density.
Many variations do, of course, exist within the spectrum.
Maybe Asians have lower density, but they have a better bone *structure*:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0116144456.htm

Not that it matters that much. Critical fall height/force is still well achievable for everyone.
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Old January 22nd, 2011, 11:35 PM   #116
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Maybe Asians have lower density, but they have a better bone *structure*:
more specifically, the study shows that Chinese-American pre menopausal Asian women have better bone structure than caucasian pre menopausal women. Study does not apply to men. And i would be carefull to distinguish Chinese American women from Asian women in that perhaps there are dietary or environmental influences at work that are not present in native Asian women.
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Old January 24th, 2011, 08:20 AM   #117
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All very true but I'd venture to say that:

a) The majority of Chinese people that are currently reading this are living in the western world, given it's a English language forum hosted in the USA.
b) The majority of folk reading this are pre-menopausal
c) And since women tend to break wrists far more often than men, then it's pretty relevent to talk about women.

On a related note, for other people here who are concerned about wrist fractures, here's another article that I found intriguing:

Executive summary: wrist guards with an air cell under the bottom splint reduce peak impact forces by 45% in a FOOSH.

http://www.nocsae.org/research/rep/H...0v3n1-4pdf.pdf

In particular, the pics on page 3. and the description above of what the air cell actually is. Haven't seen anything commercially available based on this principle, but maybe worth playing with. I've already inserted two layers of that heavy duty camping bed roll foam under my splints. Not sure it's high enough durometer to be effective, but as a nearly free, 2 minute measure, why not? Reducing the peak impact forces even a little reduces the chance of a fracture, by quite alot.
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Old January 24th, 2011, 01:33 PM   #118
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Well, who has 'better bone structure' is certainly open to individual interpretation.....

The wristguard is, in my opinion, the number one most important piece of safety equipment and should be worn every time you skate, even if all you're doing is just noodling around in your driveway.
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Old January 25th, 2011, 12:58 AM   #119
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackLace View Post
All very true but I'd venture to say that:

On a related note, for other people here who are concerned about wrist fractures, here's another article that I found intriguing:

Executive summary: wrist guards with an air cell under the bottom splint reduce peak impact forces by 45% in a FOOSH.

http://www.nocsae.org/research/rep/H...0v3n1-4pdf.pdf
Interesting! This all comes down to F*T=m*v (impulse = momentum). Perhaps the next step is deployable micro-airbags in wrist guards.

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Old January 25th, 2011, 02:30 AM   #120
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I wonder about this every time I'm at the rink. I know indoor falls are not as bad as outdoor falls, but people get hurt all the time at the rink. One adult female fell and broke her wrist. I have skated on and off for years, I have never fallen except as a kid when I was learning, but I always wear at least wrist guards, and generally wear knee pads as well. My kids have to wear knee and wrist minimum, my 5 year old who can't skate too well yet has elbow pads as well, and a helmet. My two boys were made to wear helmets when they learnt as well.
I don't understand why if this protection is available, nobody uses it? The rink has a box of all types of pads free of charge to use, yet nobody does. I had two adult beginner friends come to the rink one day, and i made them use at least wristguards.
So why is this? Does looking "cool" outweigh preventing injuries?

The answer is "THAT WILL NEVER HAPPEN TO ME."

That's why people drink & drive or text while driving, get in/ out of a car when pumping gas, ride motorcycles without hements. Yada, yada, yada.
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