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Speed Skating Forum Most of the discussions in this forum will be about inline speed skating but discussions about ice speed skating and quad roller speed skating are also welcome.

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Old August 20th, 2017, 04:23 PM   #1
kentek
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Default Smooth vs rough?

Talking about macadam (asphalt) surface condition.

How much more effort to maintain same speed on rough surface over smooth?
I think about 15-20%. I can only tell by my perceived effort and HR.

I find it a joy to be on something smooth, a rare occurrence here in Camarillo, CA.

Whadayathink?
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Old August 20th, 2017, 08:35 PM   #2
AZ Roadrunner
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kentek View Post
Talking about macadam (asphalt) surface condition.

How much more effort to maintain same speed on rough surface over smooth?
I think about 15-20%. I can only tell by my perceived effort and HR.

I find it a joy to be on something smooth, a rare occurrence here in Camarillo, CA.

Whadayathink?
Depending on how rough it is, I find it more difficult to maintain good technic is my problem especially if you're dodging cracks and holes. I've caught wheels in cracks and that is not fun and wakes you up in a hurry. 15-20% makes sense.
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Old August 24th, 2017, 07:57 PM   #3
ese002
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kentek View Post
Talking about macadam (asphalt) surface condition.

How much more effort to maintain same speed on rough surface over smooth?
I think about 15-20%. I can only tell by my perceived effort and HR.

I find it a joy to be on something smooth, a rare occurrence here in Camarillo, CA.

Whadayathink?
That sounds about right for the difference between smooth road and coarse but unbroken.

Once you get into broken pavement (pot holes, cracks, tar snakes, etc) it can be as much as 50% because it becomes impossible to maintain a consistent stride. Gatorback (extremely coarse asphalt) can also do that. Broken gatorback is the stuff of nightmares.

IMHO, training is reasonably neutral on the pavement condition as long as it is unbroken. If you can maintain consistent form, it is still good training. You just go slower.
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Old October 6th, 2017, 12:15 PM   #4
romekjagoda
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It's difficult to put a number on it, but I think it's more than 20%.
I usually skate on a pavement of big concrete blocks - there are joints every couple of meters, cracks, some parts were repaired using new concrete, some parts are very rough. I also have a spot with good asphalt. The difference is huge for me personally. Not only the surface resistance and how hard it's to push, but mainly the grip that the wheels have on the surface, the smoothness adn most importantly the ability to focus on the coorect technique throughout the movement, to make long powerful strides and not look 3 meters in front of you trying to spot potholes, cracks and stuff to avoid. The fear of going too much to an edge and being caught out by some crack or pebbles on the pavement really prevents me from applying the right technique.
I seriously think that good surface is almost as important as proper equipment (boots&skates).
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Old October 16th, 2017, 08:38 PM   #5
whiskey02
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I was never a serious skater as a kid, but being from Boston I ice skated on a few ponds and MDC rinks, played hockey. So even though it was long ago, I still think that "skating" should be on a pretty smooth surface. I am often disappointed of course, but broken, rippled, frost heaved, small branch, twig and leave covered surfaces greatly take away the enjoyment (and speed) of skating. I don't care that great inliners can skate over almost anything, I just came to inline with the childhood experience and memory that skating is a smooth surface activity. A road I sometimes train on has a few brief sections of smooth as glass blacktop and it is glorious for the few strides I can make on it! You can truly focus on just your form, technique, power, there's no constant scanning for little imperfections that can take you down.
Wait, what was the question? - yeah, rough roads and trails suck
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Old October 17th, 2017, 02:57 PM   #6
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Keep searching for a better sk8ing venue. Suggest you check out large parking lots that are not in use: schools on weekends, office parks (after closing).

Follow the asphalt truck. :-)
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Old October 18th, 2017, 02:26 PM   #7
romekjagoda
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kentek View Post
Keep searching for a better sk8ing venue. Suggest you check out large parking lots that are not in use: schools on weekends, office parks (after closing).

Follow the asphalt truck. :-)
Subterrain car parks in some shopping malls are a good venue too. Late at night they often remain lit, some even with music played via loudspeakers. The only thing to look out for are oil spills and pillars
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