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Artistic Skating Forum Discussions about any topic related to artistic roller skating including quad artistic skating, inline figure skating, pairs, dance, synchronized skating, and show skating.

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Old November 5th, 2014, 09:36 AM   #1
Rox'n'Roll
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Default Are all art boots this horrible?

So my roll-line opera package arrived today. The boot is a 'soft' Edea Prelodio, which a certain website describes as "very Comfortable Beginning Competitive Level Skate, Feels like a Traditional Skate."

I've only skates with them in my small kitchen for 20 minutes or so and I'm TOTALLY miserable about them. Up till now I've been skating in Moxi's which are soft recreational boots with a heel. The boot on the art skates are hard and they feel dead - I can't feel the plate They also seriously dig into the side of my legs when I skate. I've got a red rind around my legs from just trying them! So bummed about these boots - are all art boots like this?
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Old November 5th, 2014, 09:58 AM   #2
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Default Boots

Try stuffing the top very thinly with lambs wool - this helps loads and will moisturise your legs too
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Old November 5th, 2014, 11:42 AM   #3
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you just have to break them in and get use to them and you will be ok, also dont tie them at the very top loop yet.
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Old November 5th, 2014, 11:56 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rwsz View Post
you just have to break them in and get use to them and you will be ok, also dont tie them at the very top loop yet.
Rick's the real expert here, I think he is correct.

So just two cents.

My much cheaper Ridell 120's are cushy on the inside, right or wrong I like that. Still, it took me a good number of sessions before I got the combination of lacing and socks I like ( I like socks, I tried it without). My sock is just beyond the top of the boot so I don't chafe. My boots are extremely comfortable now.

Rick nailed the lacing too, I started with 3 eyelets free and I only have one now. I still don't like the top eyelet laced, but I think it would be technically better, especially if I did real jumps.

You also jump much better than me. My jumps are much better described as a hop-around from one foot to the other, not much chance of twisting an ankle. You'll want a stiff boot to move forward with jumping.

Last edited by Derrick; November 5th, 2014 at 11:56 AM. Reason: add
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Old November 5th, 2014, 04:46 PM   #5
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Yeah, what Rick said.

It is strange going from a boot with no support to a boot that has support.

Also, if you put a beginning skater in the same boot a world class skater uses then the beginner would never skate again. The boot of the advanced skater is way stiffer. To a beginner it would fell like trying to skate while wearing a cast.

I tell people to lace up the booot, leave the top eyelet un-done, skate 10-15 minutes, unlace the boot, completely remove your foot and then do everything over. Also, do lot's of deep knee bends.

Depending on the boot and how much you skate it can take anywhere from several hours to several weeks to break in. My Harlick's took a week or so to break in. My S.P. Teri's took a few days.

Just to give you an example...when I got speed skates I was all cocky because I am a pretty strong skater and thought I would just take to it right off. But, I got those speed boots on and after only 10 minutes my foot was killing me. Anyway, I stuck with it and now I can wear the speed skates and do 13 miles or so in a shot.

My S.P. Teri boots had a rubbing / hotspot at the top of the cuff. I just put a piece of sports tape on my leg there. Eventually you build up a sort of callous.

Good luck with the new skates. Just make it through the break-in process and you will love them.
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Old November 5th, 2014, 08:59 PM   #6
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Default Give 'em time to break in - might take months - but worth it

Rox'n'Roll, it took me 4 months to break in my art skates. That was ten years ago. Now I put them on and feet say, "Ahhh, I'm home." (And I skate barefoot.)

I remember I would lace up medium-tight (but not all the way), skate for 15-20 minutes (absolutely no more), come off the floor, unlace and let my feet rest a while, and then repeat. I did this about twice a week. The sweat and heat from your feet mold the leather to your individual foot shape. I used Mitchum anti-perspirant cream (in a small tub not a stick) on my feet for lubrication; I think it might have helped both the molding process and prevented chafing on my tootsies.

And yes, the "feedback" is muted in a stiffer boot, but it's there. You'll adjust. If you're a jumper then you'll appreciate the support your stiffer boot gives you.

Be patient and don't give up. It's worth it.
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Old November 6th, 2014, 03:39 AM   #7
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This video is the key to success with your EDEA boots. Also when tightening your laces, pull down against the tongue, not up toward the eyelets. In the video, you will also notice the skater is not wearing socks. Our DesertSk8er forum member also skates without socks. https://www.youtube.com/watch?featur...&v=xMd3EpUSFcY
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Old November 6th, 2014, 04:35 AM   #8
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thanks for the feedback everyone I skated in them for about an hour today and they definitely feel more comfortable - not comfortable just more comfortable I'm sure after a couple more sessions it'll feel strange when I go back to the soft boot :P The actual foot bit feels fine its the feedback/stiffness and ankle shaffing that gets me. I didn't do up the top lace like rwsz suggested and that made a big difference. Thanks for the vid sk8luv VERY helpful
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Old November 7th, 2014, 11:35 PM   #9
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I think this is kinda funny because EDEA's attitude is almost like you buy their boots and they fit like magic. I think it behooves people to get a fitting done. There is so much that goes into a correctly fitting boot.

You should try wearing a figure boot sometime. 85/100 on the stiffness scale.
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Old November 9th, 2014, 12:17 PM   #10
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Rox,

most of the boots are heat molded. If you have a heat gun (not sure if a hair dryer is hot enough) you can get it warm enough so that it will conform to the shape of your foot. Some people like to put it in the oven, I really like using a heat gun. Less chance of over cooking them with the gun and you can put the boots on and flex some as you soften them, but the down side is you have to tolerate a lot of heat.

I've never tried edea and not sure how they recommend molding, but I think I read that your boots are able to be heat molded. Edea probably has info how to do this the best way.

As for all of the art boots being this uncomfortable... Mostly they are. you want stiff but not too stiff. You need flex with resistance, which is where the break in takes place.

This is what I do: in the arch point, I miss an eyelet pair and I do this twice in the arch area till they break in. I also miss the top or top 2 hooks unlaced till the arch area gets broken in then I add those top hook loose till the upper portion breaks in. Once the boots are broken in I lace them up tight all the time.

If you are getting blisters then get something called MOLE SKIN. If the blisters already formed then cut a hold in a piece of mole skin and put cotton with antibiotic on it so that it covers the blister and place the mole skin so that it covers the cotton with the hole. Sometimes a second piece of mole skin over the first one with the hole in it will protect the blister. you will still feel the pressure and pain but it will be less damaging and you should still be able to skate. Once the boots are broke in, you should not have problems with blisters.
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Old November 10th, 2014, 03:22 AM   #11
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I use thse to help me tie up my skates.

http://www.amazon.com/Skatebuys-Meta.../dp/B0007DGCX4

I don't use it to put everything on tight, but it can make fine adjustments in what eye pair get what amount of tightness.

I never used low top skates ever, been using artistic type boots.

I also use regular tube socks for skating. On top of that, I use a thin gel insole in my skates too. Just some basic even thickness ones, they were in a 2 pair pack at walmart for $10.
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Old November 10th, 2014, 06:36 PM   #12
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The lace pullers look like I need a pair! Not doing up the top 2 hooks have really helped so far as has the lacing method shown in the video that sk84luv has posted. I don't know how the guy in the video adjusts the laces so effortlessly; lace pullers would definitely make life easier. Now I just need to source some here in NZ - I'm sure my local shoe repair shop will have some.

The Edea boots aren't super uncomfortable, the padded interior feels similar to a Suregrip Rebel (aside from the ankle part); it was just a bit of a shock I think going from a super soft Moxi that felt like it had nothing around the ankle to a hard boot that doesn't allow for ankle movement.

One thing I will say about these boots is that they have a very strange sweet chemical type smell about them. All Edea's seem to - I've smelt that same smell at the skate club... and I thought it was people's feet!
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Old November 11th, 2014, 02:46 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rox'n'Roll View Post
The lace pullers look like I need a pair! Not doing up the top 2 hooks have really helped so far as has the lacing method shown in the video that sk84luv has posted. I don't know how the guy in the video adjusts the laces so effortlessly; lace pullers would definitely make life easier. Now I just need to source some here in NZ - I'm sure my local shoe repair shop will have some.

The Edea boots aren't super uncomfortable, the padded interior feels similar to a Suregrip Rebel (aside from the ankle part); it was just a bit of a shock I think going from a super soft Moxi that felt like it had nothing around the ankle to a hard boot that doesn't allow for ankle movement.

One thing I will say about these boots is that they have a very strange sweet chemical type smell about them. All Edea's seem to - I've smelt that same smell at the skate club... and I thought it was people's feet!
I've always liked the radical look of the EDEA boots; I did not realize they smelt sweet. I may get a pair just for the scent, .

I paid closer attention to the video, and I saw a couple of things I would do differently for my needs. However, I don't have EDEA boots. Nevertheless, here is what I noticed: The routing of the laces does not lend itself to pulling down against the tongue. Pulling up to tighten laces does not put the proper pressure in the desired areas. Also, pulling up on some boots without eyelets will eventually tear the material, mainly leather boots, though.

This video is one I recommend for lacing. After I began pulling down against my boot tongues, the fit greatly improved. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lyNVjUp7F_E
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Old November 11th, 2014, 03:45 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by sk84luv View Post
I've always liked the radical look of the EDEA boots; I did not realize they smelt sweet. I may get a pair just for the scent, .

I paid closer attention to the video, and I saw a couple of things I would do differently for my needs. However, I don't have EDEA boots. Nevertheless, here is what I noticed: The routing of the laces does not lend itself to pulling down against the tongue. Pulling up to tighten laces does not put the proper pressure in the desired areas. Also, pulling up on some boots without eyelets will eventually tear the material, mainly leather boots, though.

This video is one I recommend for lacing. After I began pulling down against my boot tongues, the fit greatly improved. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lyNVjUp7F_E
Thanks for the tips and another excellent video! The sweet smell is not a very nice one BTW - makes me feel a bit nauseous.
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Old November 12th, 2014, 03:10 AM   #15
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EDEA has that weird outside to inside lacing technique that I believe would be difficult to do without unlacing the skate all the time.

I also recommend Riedell:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gEqEoVpIKbE
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Old November 13th, 2014, 10:40 AM   #16
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I have this exact skate, and having come from ice figure skating, they felt soft to me! Ironically, all of my skates have felt soft when I first got them, as I went from a plastic moulded ice skate, to a secondhand figure skating boot that was far too stiff, to a figure skating boot actually appropriate to my level (but always seemed a bit big?), to an entry-level artistic roller boot that fits perfectly!

I don't really have any advice to add, but from my experience I'd say as long as they fit properly, they'll feel really comfortable once they're broken in. Maybe check with your coach that the plate isn't too stiff (????), as a coach at my club said they sometimes ship with all the nuts done really tightly and can benefit from having them loosened up a bit (obviously check with your coach before doing anything).

And they do smell weird! Mine smelt really weird when I first got them, and still sort of do!
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Old November 13th, 2014, 11:24 AM   #17
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i think the smell is because the boots are not leather and whatever else they use, plastic etc.
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Old November 23rd, 2014, 01:58 AM   #18
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ok - I have to repent and go back on what I said originally - what Bunny_Hop says is true the Edea boots are super comfortable and mold to your foot in no time! The discomfort I was feeling was because I had never skated in a stiff boot before. Compared to Riedell speed boots the break in period is zero. I've skated in these boots for only 3 weeks and it feels like I've been wearing them forever.
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Old November 23rd, 2014, 12:19 PM   #19
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Quote:
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ok - I have to repent and go back on what I said originally - what Bunny_Hop says is true the Edea boots are super comfortable and mold to your foot in no time! The discomfort I was feeling was because I had never skated in a stiff boot before. Compared to Riedell speed boots the break in period is zero. I've skated in these boots for only 3 weeks and it feels like I've been wearing them forever.
glad they are working out for you, enjoy them now.
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Old November 28th, 2014, 03:50 AM   #20
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So glad it's going well Rox'n'Roll!
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