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Outdoor Quads Discussions about outdoor quad skates and any discussion relatd to skating on quad roller skatse outdoors.

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Old August 9th, 2012, 09:07 PM   #1
rollin stone
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Default How do you not trip and fall on cracks when quad skaing outdoors?

I'm a novice skater to both in-lines and quads, training to get ready for roller derby boot camp. I can now skate with my quads without falling regularly on rinks and the outdoor tennis court.

Of course, my in-lines are great for the street -- our streets in Texas are concrete with cracks (expansion joints), so there are bumps every 50 ft or so. But I really want to get proficient on my quads (I have some 78a Kryptonic Route 65s) and whenever i try to street skate, I end up just tipping forward after going over the first few cracks.

Any advice?
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Old August 9th, 2012, 10:21 PM   #2
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Move one foot foward, and the other behind. Your body's mass is now centered between the two sets of wheels, and since only one set of skates will hit the crack at a time you'll have one steady skate to keep balance with.

Or use the opportunity to actually step over the crack, as part of your stroke, and don't hit the crack at all.

Both skates hitting that crack at once is just asking to be pitched forward.

I'm fairly novice myself, but have found these to be effective at avoiding the faceplant.
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Old August 9th, 2012, 10:24 PM   #3
rollin stone
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ZenSteve View Post
Move one foot foward, and the other behind. Your body's mass is now centered between the two sets of wheels, and since only one set of skates will hit the crack at a time you'll have one steady skate to keep balance with.

Or use the opportunity to actually step over the crack, as part of your stroke, and don't hit the crack at all.

Both skates hitting that crack at once is just asking to be pitched forward.

I'm fairly novice myself, but have found these to be effective at avoiding the faceplant.
Great advice, Steve! I may try it tonight
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Old August 9th, 2012, 10:27 PM   #4
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For outdoor quad skating, many people do 1 of 2 options.
1 use larger wheels
2 mount the plate further forward

I am sure there are some eager loggers who want to explain why, so I will wait for them since I am on my phone.
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Old August 9th, 2012, 11:02 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by swolltitan View Post
For outdoor quad skating, many people do 1 of 2 options.
1 use larger wheels
2 mount the plate further forward
This, and roll over them on the diagonal.
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Old August 9th, 2012, 11:10 PM   #6
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Default i do both...

Quote:
Originally Posted by swolltitan View Post
For outdoor quad skating, many people do 1 of 2 options.
1 use larger wheels
2 mount the plate further forward

I am sure there are some eager loggers who want to explain why, so I will wait for them since I am on my phone.

my out-door set as described above...
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Old August 10th, 2012, 01:41 AM   #7
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Also get a soft duro set of wheels.
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Old August 10th, 2012, 04:31 AM   #8
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Default Outdoor Optimized

Quote:
Originally Posted by rollin stone View Post
I'm a novice skater to both in-lines and quads, training to get ready for roller derby boot camp. I can now skate with my quads without falling regularly on rinks and the outdoor tennis court.

Of course, my in-lines are great for the street -- our streets in Texas are concrete with cracks (expansion joints), so there are bumps every 50 ft or so. But I really want to get proficient on my quads (I have some 78a Kryptonic Route 65s) and whenever i try to street skate, I end up just tipping forward after going over the first few cracks.
There already is plenty of good info here at SLF posted previously on this subject.
Just search "Outdoor optimized".

Can you post a side view PIC of your skates?

Because quads have only two axles, any downward rolling surface imperfections
encountered will initially cause the front wheels to drop into them, demanding that the dropped front wheel then climb back up and out of the crack, hole, etc.

Unfortunately, as this cycle proceeds, there is also a point where a sharp momentum breaking effect happens as the wheel starts to climb back up from the low point of where it dropped, which slows your forward momentum enough to pitch your weight forward onto the front axle.

This shifting of your focus of weight onto the front axle further aggravates the situation, as it tends to drive the front wheel back down in the crack and pin it up against the front wall of the crack. This becomes a vicious cycle, as the longer the wheel sticks the more you are pitched forward, and the more you pitch forward the longer your wheels stick.

In scientific terms, this is known as "positive feedback" and leads to runaway situations, in your case falling forward.

The following things, listed in order of most effective 1st,, will help counteract this effect:

0) As Skate Mech said: be rolling at an angle to the cracks as you cross them.

1) Skate with more of your weight on the rear wheels (2/3 on rear and 1/3 on front), and stay lower to help with this rearward shifting of your weight distribution.

2) Move your plate as far forward as you can have it, without having it make you tip over backwards. However, this can a problem if you only have one set of skates and you want different plate locations as you go back and forth from indoor to outdoor.

3) Softer wheels -- but they will slow you down some too.

4) Larger wheels -- but they will be heavier too.

-Armadillo
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Old August 10th, 2012, 08:02 AM   #9
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All good advice so far.............l agree with (and practice) all of it for outdoor quad skating.

All that being said the best and safest option has not been mentioned which is the use your Inlines outdoors and quads indoors, you will wind up a better all round skater as well.

Before I get smashed for saying that I can and do skate quads outdoors and am the 2011 NSW quad grade winner, all of the racing is done outdoors.
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Old August 11th, 2012, 01:31 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rollin stone View Post
(I have some 78a Kryptonic Route 65s)
I must've missed this- I'd have thought these would be fine..........
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Old August 20th, 2012, 03:38 PM   #11
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I agree with all said above, but really want to put some emphasis on the two I feel are most important and easiest to fix...
1) Don't lean forward, keep your weight mostly on the back axle, but not to the point of actually tipping your skate up. If you are skating on a sidewalk, well, that's gonna suck. You don't want to constantly be trying to stroke across cracks all the time. But if you are skating a long and there are occasional cracks, then if you make a habit of not leaning onto your toes, that will help. Sticking your butt out more towards the back and keeping your weight back 'there' will help.

2) One foot slightly in front of the other should be how you roll over them, Don't ever ever ever put your skates right next to each other, that's asking for trouble.

This was the advice I was given since I was little skating outdoors with my Dad and the only times I've ever fallen outdoors was when there was an equipment malfunction and something fell off my skate, or there was washout across a trail and I made the mistake of trying to jump over it.
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Old August 22nd, 2012, 06:49 AM   #12
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Default Also

try not to think about it.

No point jinxing yourself
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Old August 22nd, 2012, 09:20 AM   #13
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Focus on feeling your rear wheels and pressing more weight onto them.

Not only will you fall less if you keep more of your weight on the rear wheels, but you will roll faster as well.

Frequent falling forward outdoors is a sure indicator that a skater is rolling with way too much of their weight on the front wheels.

I tend to do this and it is a very bad and difficult to break habit. Hitting the ground is a tough way to be reminded, but even if you aren't falling, it is important to avoid allowing too much weight to settle onto the front axle. Mentally, I tend to feel more ready to handle things with my weight more up on my toes, but outside this is 100% the reverse opposite. You are MORE READY for trouble with LESS WEIGHT on your toes.

Skating in a lower position can help keep the weight more back on the rear wheels, and is good for rolling into a head wind as well.

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Old August 22nd, 2012, 10:59 AM   #14
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I always wound up putting most of my weight on my back foot and have the front truck of my front foot elevated when coasting up to a crack. when the back wheels of the front skate hit the crack, the back skate would come forward. hope this helps
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Old August 23rd, 2012, 04:50 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Armadillo View Post
Focus on feeling your rear wheels and pressing more weight onto them.

Not only will you fall less if you keep more of your weight on the rear wheels, but you will roll faster as well.

Frequent falling forward outdoors is a sure indicator that a skater is rolling with way too much of their weight on the front wheels.

I tend to do this and it is a very bad and difficult to break habit. Hitting the ground is a tough way to be reminded, but even if you aren't falling, it is important to avoid allowing too much weight to settle onto the front axle. Mentally, I tend to feel more ready to handle things with my weight more up on my toes, but outside this is 100% the reverse opposite. You are MORE READY for trouble with LESS WEIGHT on your toes.

Skating in a lower position can help keep the weight more back on the rear wheels, and is good for rolling into a head wind as well.

-Armadillo
I agree with this as well as '(2/3 on rear and 1/3 on front)'

I street skate every day and on some really horrible surfaces. I generally have one foot in front and one behind with most of my weight on the rear back wheels. I like to think of my toes as indicators for my heels, testing out the pavement. Also get in the habit of stepping over the large cracks and holes that will grab your wheels (don't be afraid to lift your feet). Never lock your knees, always be bent over. And look ahead to decide the best route - sometimes you can avoid the broken pavement by moving to the other side of the path.
Those Krypto' wheels are perfect for street skating, they are so bouncy and fun. But if you go too slow with them, its easy to get caught in a crack and trip - speed is your friend
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Old August 25th, 2012, 03:34 AM   #16
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I agree with this as well as '(2/3 on rear and 1/3 on front)'

I street skate every day and on some really horrible surfaces. I generally have one foot in front and one behind with most of my weight on the rear back wheels. I like to think of my toes as indicators for my heels, testing out the pavement. Also get in the habit of stepping over the large cracks and holes that will grab your wheels (don't be afraid to lift your feet). Never lock your knees, always be bent over. And look ahead to decide the best route - sometimes you can avoid the broken pavement by moving to the other side of the path.
Those Krypto' wheels are perfect for street skating, they are so bouncy and fun. But if you go too slow with them, its easy to get caught in a crack and trip - speed is your friend
More good points from one who obviously has the street skating experience to know what works best.

BTW, the DA45 family of plates do not make very good outdoor plates for rough surface skating, because their geometry causes nearly all the skaters weight to be carried on the pivot pins, and very little by the cushions, which neutralizes some of the potential shock absorbing capability that the upper cushions can normally offer, especially soft ones.

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