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Beginning Skaters Forum This is the place for beginning skaters to ask questions and share their stories. We would love to hear about your experiences learning to skate. No question is too dumb!

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Old September 29th, 2016, 12:04 AM   #1
lilyd2016
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Question Shopping for my first skates, need advice

I have no experience skating. My 10 year old uses inline skates and she is getting better all the time. So, I am hoping to join her.
I am trying to decide between K2 Alexis and K2 Alexis Pro.
Which one is better for a total newbie?
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Old September 29th, 2016, 04:24 AM   #2
Mort
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The basic difference is the base model is a plastic frame, and the pro model is a die cast aluminum frame.

If your using these skates outdoors I would suggest getting a solid plastic shell style. They are more durable. Also mens skates arent really any different than womens aside from color schemes.

Best to look for both male/female marketed boots, try to find models from 1-3 years old that didnt sell that originaly had over a 200$ MSRP.
Rollerblade twister 24/// twister 80 is a good urban skate for example. Theres a LOT of online retailers, search around

Try to find something that uses 80mm wheels. Any higher for a beginer is going to be a bit more difficult to start with. Smaller wheels keep you closer to the ground and greatly reduce the leverages on your ankles.

A smaller frame such as a "243" frame size will fit 80mm wheels and less. So you could even go as far as putting 72mm wheels on them.
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Old September 29th, 2016, 02:37 PM   #3
CKS
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I'd hit the second-hand stores and try on skates until you find a pair that feels comfortable. Skate them until you feel comfortable on them and know what you want in a pair of skates. Then go buy a better pair.

Around here, the local Goodwill sells skates for $6; other thrift stores charge typically from $1 to $10. Most of the skates are inlines, and most of them are in good shape, from people who bought them and didn't use them or from kids who grew out of them quickly. Some are trashed, though, so make sure the wheels aren't worn away (and that they spin) and make sure the buckles and straps are in good shape. Most important, though, is that it feels comfortable.

I live in a city of about 40,000 people. If I hit all the thrift stores in my town, I'd expect to find 5-10 pairs of reasonable skates on any particular day. A week later, half of them would be different. If you live somewhere with a ready supply of thrift shops, picking up a pair of learner inlines is pretty easy.
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Old September 30th, 2016, 02:46 AM   #4
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Most thrift stores have junk. If the pair in the thrift store did not cost at least 200$ MSRP, youll want to pass on them.

Most people just tear them down for bearings honestly
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Old September 30th, 2016, 06:23 PM   #5
CKS
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The skates available in thrift shops range from junk to really nice stuff. However, "junk" skates are just fine to learn on, provided they are comfortable, and that you don't pay more for them than they are worth. My first skates (inlines, free at a rummage sale, and totally junk) lasted me for a year before I was good enough to be able to appreciate a better skate. My next inlines (RollerBlade MacroBlades, $8 at Goodwill) were a much better skate, but they wouldn't have done me any good a year earlier. In fact, I wouldn't have gotten them a year earlier, because I'd have thought they were too small - they were barely used, and the liner was big and fluffy.

The advice I'd give to someone who already knows how to skate would be rather different than the advice I'd give to someone who doesn't know how to skate.
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Old September 30th, 2016, 08:03 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CKS View Post
The skates available in thrift shops range from junk to really nice stuff. However, "junk" skates are just fine to learn on, provided they are comfortable, and that you don't pay more for them than they are worth. My first skates (inlines, free at a rummage sale, and totally junk) lasted me for a year before I was good enough to be able to appreciate a better skate. My next inlines (RollerBlade MacroBlades, $8 at Goodwill) were a much better skate, but they wouldn't have done me any good a year earlier. In fact, I wouldn't have gotten them a year earlier, because I'd have thought they were too small - they were barely used, and the liner was big and fluffy.

The advice I'd give to someone who already knows how to skate would be rather different than the advice I'd give to someone who doesn't know how to skate.
Problem is that if you haven't skated before, you won't know what complete junk is and what isn't. I do like the idea of second hand skates, there are plenty of decent hockey skates out there at places like Play It Again sports. I'd imagine you could some good learning hockey skates for about $60-$100 used.
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Old October 12th, 2016, 05:10 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mort View Post
Most thrift stores have junk. If the pair in the thrift store did not cost at least 200$ MSRP, youll want to pass on them.

Most people just tear them down for bearings honestly
There you go talking about me again.... lol
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Old November 8th, 2016, 01:09 AM   #8
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If you are looking for a one-time spending option that can last along while with ability to grow with, then I tend to agree with Mort re: hardshell skates, be it rollerblade's Twister 243's or Seba F1's or other, and more so for the mere fact that most hardshells also provide you ability to adjust the frames position if it is not in the right place from factory. Everyone has a different anatomy and different points of body alignment, balance, and centering, and a skate off-center may force you onto eternal inside edges with no hope of aligning things correctly.

Other 'softboot' contenders to the hard shell Rollerblade's Twister or Fusion skates: K2's Midtwon/Uptown/Broadway or Rollerblade's Metro skates. These have soft uppers and adjustable aluminum frames. Good, versatile, comfy cruising skate options.

And, will agree that an aluminum frame is a better choice (upgrade) over plastic composite frames.
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Old November 12th, 2016, 04:19 AM   #9
MANY_SkatingDave
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Hi lily,

Glad you are thinking about joining your young one.
They get fast and good really quick...

The fall, they get up, they fall they get up
Hey that is part of a song from Shakira Africa
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pRpeEdMmmQ0

Beyond the other posts that have given you some skate advice, I mean I could add a RollerBlade option, let us Add Protection to your Stuff to buy.

RollerBlade used to sell a full bag of goodies, knee, elbow, wrist stuff.

AND Do not forget a Helmet. Protect the most important part of your body.

And read some of shesk8's post at getting started like on Grass first and then migrate to the harder surfaces. BTW I have seen some pole InLiners using ski poles to steady them.

Good Luck and Keep Skating.

Yours in Skating, MA/NY Skating Dave
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