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Artistic Skating Forum Discussions about any topic related to artistic roller skating including quad artistic skating, inline figure skating, pairs, dance, synchronized skating, and show skating.

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Old May 12th, 2017, 10:27 PM   #1
Dominique
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Join Date: May 2017
Location: Belgium
Posts: 4
Default Using shorter plates and rockering the wheels

Hello,

I used to practice slalom skating on inlines, with wheels in a rockered configuration (two big ones in the middle, smaller at the ends). Skating this way gives quite the same sensations as with ice skates.
The PIC skates and the Snow White skates are also rockered.

I went artistic for a few monthes, and intend to purchase probably some artistic roller skates.
I went last week in an artistic roller skate club in my area, and tried out some roller skates they borrowed me. The feeling I got was that I could hardly move my feet laterally, giving me problems for narrow edges.

If I buy some roller skates, the first step I can take to overcome this lack of manoeuvrability is to pick some dance plates like the Roll Line Dance, from what I read on this forum.
The second step I could implement is to choose shorter plates relatively to the boot size.
The third solution I could experiment is to rocker my wheels as explained in this video (in portugese).

Could you please tell me what you think of the rockering tip presented in this video (he shows a schema at the end).
Particularly, I use to work out every trick I ever learned (in agressive inline, and later in slalom inline) at each side : e.g. spin in horlogic direction as well in anti-horlogic). The rockered configutation showed in the video is of interest only for skaters doing tricks at only one side, and not the other, no?

Also, according to my feet length which is 260cm, could anybody tell me what is the shorter Roller Line Dance plate I can mount on my future boots?

Thank you for your help!
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Old May 13th, 2017, 02:30 AM   #2
amohrfeld
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Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Houston Texas
Posts: 206
Default

The video looks like he is using different hardness wheels at different locations.
All the art skaters at my rink do this.

If your concern is turning, First look at cushion hardness.
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Old May 13th, 2017, 05:37 AM   #3
larryoracing
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Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Lomita, Ca, work in El Segundo, CA
Posts: 864
Smile Hope this helps...lol!

https://www.skatesus.com/learning_ce...hart.php?frd=f

If your foot measures 260 mm, that is equal to about 10.25 inches. Do the calculation for yourself.

By the Edea Chart above that would be a EDEA 275 MM boot.
That means you would need a 165mm Roll-line Dance plate.

1) I would tend to agree with Amorfield and that it is not the type of plate, not the length of the plate and not the rockering that determines how a plate will react or move across the floor.

1a) I would try to loosen the trucks a bit. Your edges will improve immediately.

2) I have been pushing people away from the Roll Line Dance plate. I just think it is too much plate for the beginner, amateur or first time roller skater.

2a) I have been pushing people towards the Roll Line Energy plate. Which many National Champions wear and it is a quite common skate among beginner, amateur and first time roller skaters at the roller rink!

2b) My friend was dead set on a pair of Dance plates. I told him I thought they were too much skate for him. A couple weeks later he comes back and says he’s going to buy the Energy plate. I said “why”. He said “I think the Dance plate is too much for me and a lot of session skaters are running the Energy plate”. “EXACTLY”!

3) Secondly I would highly recommend against buying the shorter plate.

3a) You can’t buy the Dance plate in the 165 length. That means you have to go shorter (and fall on you’re a$$, or go with the longer plate and feel like your in heaven with a skate that is really controllable and fun to skate on. Buy the way you can buy the Energy skate in a 165 mm length. I don’t know why that is?????

4) Rockering. I don’t speak Portuguese. Typically you put the grip wheels on the pivot wheels. If you are spinning in both directions that would mean all your wheels would be grip wheels. Most people on spin one direction…CW or CCW and not both directions.

5) The last thing is boots. And that is another story and there are lot of manufacturers and types, all for a different purpose. I would go with mfg recommendation for size of plate, type of plate, bearings , type of wheels and type of boots.

Sincerely,

Larry Otani

I have 5 pairs of skates. Each with a different purpose. Skates for Dance, Skates for Figures and Skates for Freestyle. The Energy can do them all and very well!
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Old May 16th, 2017, 01:45 PM   #4
Dominique
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Join Date: May 2017
Location: Belgium
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Default

Thanks to both of you fot these answers!

Quote:
Originally Posted by larryoracing View Post
If your foot measures 260 mm, that is equal to about 10.25 inches. Do the calculation for yourself.

By the Edea Chart above that would be a EDEA 275 MM boot.
Why do I need a 275mm boot if my feet are 260mm? a 267mm (Edea 265 or 270 i.e. 10.5 inches) boot wouldn't do it? My feet have stop growng and are quite thin.

Quote:
Originally Posted by larryoracing View Post
I have been pushing people away from the Roll Line Dance plate. I just think it is too much plate for the beginner, amateur or first time roller skater.
I am not a beginner in skating at all, I mean inline. I jump a tour and a half in all directions, starting backwads or forwards, I manage footwork on a single wheel on my inlines, skate park, ...

What I liked about the Roll-line Dance plate is their lower center of gravity, which reminds me my aggressive inlines when I was a teenager. And I never understood why inlines manufacturers didn't propose wheels smaller than 72mm (2.83 inches) for urban riding.

What about the Roll-line Mistrals then? they are cheaper than the Energy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by larryoracing View Post
I would go with mfg recommendation for size of plate, type of plate, bearings , type of wheels and type of boots.
What is MFG please?
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Old May 17th, 2017, 05:07 AM   #5
larryoracing
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Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Lomita, Ca, work in El Segundo, CA
Posts: 864
Smile Here's my best reply...lol! Good luck on your skate purchase.

I really don’t know why the foot measurements are not the same size as the boot measurements. I’m guessing the extra material and such makes the actual size of the boot larger than the actual size of the measurements of the actual foot????

The Dance plate is too wobbly to do jumps on. It is designed to do Dance. I would strongly suggest you buy a freestyle plate if you are going to do jumps and spins and buy a stiff boot like the EDEA Concerto. I wouldn’t want you to break an ankle.

I really don’t know much about the Minstral plate.
If the MFG (manufacturer..ie…roll line) suggests a certain plate for a discipline, like Dance, Figures or Freestyle, I would buy that plate for that particular discipline. I use the Energy plate for jumps and spins and the Dance Plate to do dance in. I feel the Dance plate is too wobbly to land a jump on, regardless if it has lower CG.

Sincerely,

Larry Otani

P.S. This is wrong but I use the "Ring" plate for figures and I have bought a Matrix plate and a EDEA Piano boot for a backup Freestyle plate.

I also bought a 45 degree Synder Royal Speed skate and a EDEA Ice Fly boot to experiment for freestyle on?
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Old May 17th, 2017, 09:26 PM   #6
amohrfeld
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Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Houston Texas
Posts: 206
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by larryoracing View Post

2) I have been pushing people away from the Roll Line Dance plate. I just think it is too much plate for the beginner, amateur or first time roller skater.
What does "too much plate" mean?

Are you referring to the more turn movement? or something else?
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Old May 18th, 2017, 01:14 AM   #7
larryoracing
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Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Lomita, Ca, work in El Segundo, CA
Posts: 864
Smile Yep more turn movement! The most of any skate made.

There are a lot of skaters who like this Dance Plate as a session skate or whatever they are skating at the local skating rink. But I don’t think you will find anybody in the world who uses a Dance Plate as Competitive, Competition, Artistic Roller skating Freestyle plate (jumps and spins, like an axel, 1.5 rotation jump, jumping forward on one foot and landing on the opposite foot going backwards. Or lets say a double mapes, Take off going backward, two rotations in the air and landing on one foot going backwards.

I would not recommend this plate for somebody jumping on the streets and sidewalks. A sure way to break an ankle.

Sincerely,

Larry Otani
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