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Hockey and Other Roller Games Discussions about hockey played on inline skates, quad roller skates, and ice skates. Also includes discussions about other games played on skates such as roller basketball and rollersoccer.

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Old June 24th, 2015, 06:06 PM   #1
Jesse
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Default Mounting for outdoors..

Building a pair of outdoor skates that will see a good amount of street hockey use (and I mean "street" in a very literal sense).

It's been years since I've played, but never recall having any issues with the kind of standard mounts that stock, lower-end speed skates come with.

Since I have the choice, though, I'm wondering if something a bit more forward might be appropriate, given the conditions. Maybe somewhere between a standard and a forward mount?

Plate is what you might consider "sport" length. A size smaller than manufacturer recommendation, or in this case, a 165 on a size 9 boot.

Thoughts, comments, suggestions appreciated.
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Old June 24th, 2015, 08:46 PM   #2
ursle
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I see no reason to change anything between indoors and outdoors, if your speed skating the front axle is naturally more forward, if you're dancing and playing around moving the front axle back a bit gives the skates more action, as far as the rear axle, as long as it's not in front of the outer ankle bone you're in the Best spot, all the stability you need and a plate that's not so long it doesn't have good action.

So are you d/a 45 or less, different type of style both work, with the lower degree king pins 5-10 and somewhat 18, you tend to rock on your inner or outer wheels to turn sharply, with the 45 action, it turns with all four wheels down, have skated both extensively, prefer the 45.

Again, the front axle placement determines the action of the skate, the further forward the less action, more stability, and vice-versa. Putting the front axle forward for outdoor skating is silly, just step over the cracks and stones, falling once will teach you how (wrist guards) unless of course your speed skating outdoors, but why not on inlines?
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Old June 24th, 2015, 09:35 PM   #3
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Where you like your axles, thats where they belong

Theres loads of debate on where to mount plates, what toe in or toe out to use, how far forward the front should be, and where the rear should fall for a given placement.

Myself, it doesn't matter what skates I have on my feet, as long as the front axle is far enough forward so the skate isnt tippy. I don't use toe stops, so typically I like my axles as far forward as possible. A skate is faster in top speed that way, but slightly harder to accelerate. If your goal is hockey use with toestops, a mag avenger would be a good bet. For its price point, nothing comes close. Probably the front axle to fall where you would be able to pick up a pencil between your toes would suit you well. If your playing hockey, it must be with people, does anyone else use quads? If so have or tried their gear? Or would it be possible?

As for my preference on plate placement, I like mine with a little heel out toe in compared to the traditional mounting that people use (very slight bias, nothing most would ever notice) . Also a long wheelbase is my preference. Ive never been out cornered by a short wheelbase which I couldnt easuly make up for with lateral strength and agility, maybe when im older and cant move with as much gusto, that will change.

If you want to emulate a longer wheelbase feel, you could try on some rentals that are too big, this will push the axle forward under your foot. And while this isnt the exact feeling youll get since the boot will be too big, it should be approximate enough for you to make a decision as to where you would want yours put in the fore/aft direction.

What you need to consider is everything, and how much you got to work with. Wheels will make one of the largest impacts on your skates performance aside from a good fitting boot, and a properly set up suspension.
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Old June 24th, 2015, 11:35 PM   #4
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Default What is the 165mm plate you already have?

If this build is to be meant for outdoor hockey, then we can assume that rapid and constant changes in direction, as well as accelerations/decelerations will be your normal mode of skating.

On top of that you do not indicate what boot you are likely to be ending up using. Will it have much of a heel, if any? How much heel lift do you like, if any?

Knowing that outdoor hockey stops are more difficult to execute unless your wheels are rather too firm for good grip while skating/pushing, can we assume that, when reversing direction ASAP is needed, you will want to be using toe stops and doing quick 180's into a full toe stop breaking move?

The axle placement, IMO, is more important factor foe when you need to make a lot of transition moves that demand going up onto just the two wheels of the front axle.

Most skaters are used to and expect that front axles be located in a certain narrow band, such that when tipping their skates up to roll on just the front axle, for transitions (forward/rearward), the ankle leverage needed to bring rear wheels up should not shift dramatically higher than what has been the norm (for them) on prior quad skates.

Contrary to what ursle said, if a suspension setup is properly tuned for generous freedom of action it will give you that, regardless or where the axles are placed. Your foot may have slightly better or worse leverage for working the action, but that is only a concern when the suspension is very stiffly tuned.

If there is potential for hockey checks to stand you up with a rearward pushing hit, having rear axle a bit more rearward (from longer wheelbase) can give some benefit.

Offer more details on questions I raised for getting better, more specific advise.

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Old June 25th, 2015, 04:13 PM   #5
Fancy-Kerrigan
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If you have an indoor set up you like. I'd go with that.
My latest skate build was mounted too far forward.....not by much but enough that my foot is fitigued at the end of the session from the extra effort needed to make it do what I want it to do.
Skating in the street you will want some stability to put your weight on your heels to get over stuff. If your weight is on your toes and you hit a rock, you and the street will become one very quickly.
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Old June 30th, 2015, 06:29 PM   #6
Jesse
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Thank you guys for your replies. Very helpful.
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Old May 9th, 2016, 11:27 PM   #7
everest
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Smile ANY SKATE can play hockey

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jesse View Post
Building a pair of outdoor skates that will see a good amount of street hockey use (and I mean "street" in a very literal sense).

It's been years since I've played, but never recall having any issues with the kind of standard mounts that stock, lower-end speed skates come with.

Since I have the choice, though, I'm wondering if something a bit more forward might be appropriate, given the conditions. Maybe somewhere between a standard and a forward mount?

Plate is what you might consider "sport" length. A size smaller than manufacturer recommendation, or in this case, a 165 on a size 9 boot.

Thoughts, comments, suggestions appreciated.

To be precise, any kind of skate can be street hockey skate, if you are not doing anything that needs the design of a hockey skate. Street hockey is more like recreational sport, short range and fun playing, not much rushing and skating.

The only think you may want to change is the wheel, change to the Rinkrat Asphalt outdoor hockey wheel, and you will pretty much never need to replace it again......I have them, and it is kind of hard to make them damaged.... very good quality on the pavement.


If what I say is not quite what you really want to know, ask me in detail so I can help.
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