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Old December 5th, 2017, 06:26 AM   #1
netplaceus
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Default Rexing - No real way to stop without a toe stop?

Ok I have toe stops, but sometimes I take them out. If I feel like I am going to need to slow down or there may be trouble ahead I just turn around. I have always assumed this is what everyone does. I don't think I have every seen anyone stop quickly going backwards without toe stops.

Anyway, I got to thinking, is there any reliable (safe) way to stop without a toe stop if you're skating backwards (short of turning around)?
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Old December 5th, 2017, 08:17 AM   #2
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Reverse plough stop or reverse T stop work. Or if you are feeling confident a suicide stop (skating backwards, pick one foot up, extend leg in direction of travel and stab down wheels sideways). It looks cool as all hell, but you have to commit to it.
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Old December 5th, 2017, 10:13 AM   #3
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What Hebe said.
But dont stab ...sweep.
Unless YOU like broken ankles.
Reverse hockey stop as well.
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Old December 5th, 2017, 10:32 AM   #4
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Reverse plough stop or reverse T stop work. Or if you are feeling confident a suicide stop (skating backwards, pick one foot up, extend leg in direction of travel and stab down wheels sideways). It looks cool as all hell, but you have to commit to it.
Thanks I'll have to try a few! I looked on line for video examples, not a single example.
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Old December 5th, 2017, 10:35 AM   #5
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What Hebe said.
But dont stab ...sweep.
Unless YOU like broken ankles.
Reverse hockey stop as well.
Thanks!
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Old December 5th, 2017, 11:48 AM   #6
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Default spin stop on toes

If your not going too fast. At least I donít do it at break neck speed.
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Old December 5th, 2017, 06:13 PM   #7
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Thanks I'll have to try a few! I looked on line for video examples, not a single example.
All the same theories as going forward, just done in the backwards direction.
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Old December 5th, 2017, 08:22 PM   #8
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The trick is selecting the right wheels.

I have not used toe stops since I started skating 18 months ago (I want to be like the cool kids). I hockey stop or sometimes plow. While trying to find the right wheel I wrecked a few times because my wheels were too hard and I was going too fast. Also with too soft wheels I can't break the grip and slide. So too soft wheels can be just as dangerous.

The wheels I currently use are Faster 92A/96A for my low cut boots
and Bones 101A for my high top boots.
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Old December 6th, 2017, 08:43 PM   #9
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Anybody have videos or care to make them of the various stops mentioned here I would love to see some in action.
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Old December 8th, 2017, 07:58 AM   #10
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Anybody have videos or care to make them of the various stops mentioned here I would love to see some in action.
As all ready pointed out, All the same theories as going forward, just done in the backwards direction. I get that, but it sure seems like it is easier said than done. That being said, I have much to learn.

It is funny though, out of all the zillions of youtube videos on skating there is not one on stopping backwards. I have seen some old school rexers t-stop to slow down, but I think they would be screwed if they had to slow down quickly.

I love my Bones 101A's , but I've never seen anybody stop fast on them (backwards) on an average wood floor. And some wheels like Roll-Line's PANTHER 95A have incredible roll and grip, but you will flat them if you try and stop on them.

I would be interested in knowing how really experienced fast rexers think about the stopping problem. I would be terrified going that fast! But I am thinking maybe their navigating skills are just so good they don't worrie about it. I skate really fast forward sometimes, can't say I that worried about stopping fast, but maybe I should be.
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Old December 8th, 2017, 06:36 PM   #11
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You seem to have your answer, no way to stop with hard wheels without flatting them, might I suggest the small button toe stops, adjusted up out of the way, but when needed, there.
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Old December 8th, 2017, 11:33 PM   #12
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You seem to have your answer, no way to stop with hard wheels without flatting them, might I suggest the small button toe stops, adjusted up out of the way, but when needed, there.
I think I do, and I think it's this:

Regardless of your wheels or toe stops you are not going to stop fast in most unexpected situations (unless you have time and space), it just not practical. You just do your best to keep your "exits" options open in a rink with lots of others. And a quick stop just might make things worse.

Come to think of it, it's not that much different than the freeway, most of us drive closer then we have time to stop, good drivers try to keep left and right "escapes" open.


But I think I'll try the small rubber button toe stops, good idea.
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Old December 9th, 2017, 01:30 AM   #13
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As all ready pointed out, All the same theories as going forward, just done in the backwards direction. I get that, but it sure seems like it is easier said than done. That being said, I have much to learn.

It is funny though, out of all the zillions of youtube videos on skating there is not one on stopping backwards. I have seen some old school rexers t-stop to slow down, but I think they would be screwed if they had to slow down quickly.

I love my Bones 101A's , but I've never seen anybody stop fast on them (backwards) on an average wood floor. And some wheels like Roll-Line's PANTHER 95A have incredible roll and grip, but you will flat them if you try and stop on them.

I would be interested in knowing how really experienced fast rexers think about the stopping problem. I would be terrified going that fast! But I am thinking maybe their navigating skills are just so good they don't worrie about it. I skate really fast forward sometimes, can't say I that worried about stopping fast, but maybe I should be.
Rexing or slicing through traffic at high speed leaves very little time to react to bad situations you can get yourself into. At the Champions rink, there is a group of us that skate on Sundays. We are allowed to self regulate our speeds. However as a rule we do not touch anyone. If one of our skaters that comes into the group and gets out of hand, they get talked to. But it has only happened a couple of times..
But to the point, stopping at high speed is hard thing to do on quads. You can brake with stops, you can T stop and you can attempt to do a controlled slide, but you are still covering a lot of ground in a hurry. Having hard enough wheels to do a good slide, you are still moving. Just like in cars on the freeway, you have to condition yourself to compensating, predicting the floor(Not one rink I have ever been to "moves the same") and learning to watch people to compensate for their changes or possible changes in direction. So if traffic is too thick and unpredictable, we slow it down, to allow ourselves more time to compensate. As the floor thins out, we can slowly start cranking it back up, but still monitor traffic in case some rolling land mines suddenly come onto the floor. Having enough space to allow for passing others during a "what if" is the big part of it. If there is not enough room, then you are going too fast for traffic. The faster you go the further you want to look ahead in traffic to see where everyone is going.
Getting around the trouble is much easier than trying to stop suddenly, not going to be pretty, a high speed stop, usually means a crash....
We haven't hit anyone in a very long time. Usually we can basically draft off another skater at speed for a couple of laps then we back off. Just to see if we can lose the drafter. The lead person can pick the line, it's up to the drafters to keep up for a couple of laps, then break off. You can go fast, but no way go flat out, not enough space at that speed.
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Old December 9th, 2017, 03:03 AM   #14
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Rexing or slicing through traffic at high speed leaves very little time to react to bad situations you can get yourself into. At the Champions rink, there is a group of us that skate on Sundays. We are allowed to self regulate our speeds. However as a rule we do not touch anyone. If one of our skaters that comes into the group and gets out of hand, they get talked to. But it has only happened a couple of times..
But to the point, stopping at high speed is hard thing to do on quads. You can brake with stops, you can T stop and you can attempt to do a controlled slide, but you are still covering a lot of ground in a hurry. Having hard enough wheels to do a good slide, you are still moving. Just like in cars on the freeway, you have to condition yourself to compensating, predicting the floor(Not one rink I have ever been to "moves the same") and learning to watch people to compensate for their changes or possible changes in direction. So if traffic is too thick and unpredictable, we slow it down, to allow ourselves more time to compensate. As the floor thins out, we can slowly start cranking it back up, but still monitor traffic in case some rolling land mines suddenly come onto the floor. Having enough space to allow for passing others during a "what if" is the big part of it. If there is not enough room, then you are going too fast for traffic. The faster you go the further you want to look ahead in traffic to see where everyone is going.
Getting around the trouble is much easier than trying to stop suddenly, not going to be pretty, a high speed stop, usually means a crash....
We haven't hit anyone in a very long time. Usually we can basically draft off another skater at speed for a couple of laps then we back off. Just to see if we can lose the drafter. The lead person can pick the line, it's up to the drafters to keep up for a couple of laps, then break off. You can go fast, but no way go flat out, not enough space at that speed.
This is awesome advice, I really appreciate your taking the time to make such a comprehensive answer too.

"Getting around the trouble is much easier than trying to stop suddenly"

That's what I have observed, but was not 100% sure until now. Thanks!
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Old December 9th, 2017, 03:55 AM   #15
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I skate with fierocious1 sometimes and agree with everything he is saying here.

To add to his statement; a couple of the guys skate inlines and I have yet to see them do a serious hockey stop. I've seen the experienced kids do it on inlines but not us old farts. So they really don't have a choice but anticipate.

I tend to skate a little more risky and rely on hockey stops to sluff off speed in a pinch. But I also skate a slightly harder wheel which decreases control when reaching max speed. So its a trade-off.

A guy I skate with does the suicide stop and it looks awesome. But he uses wood wheels. He does some other cool moves too that the wheels allow. When he really gets going you can smell the wood wheels burning.
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Old December 9th, 2017, 07:06 AM   #16
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I skate with fierocious1 sometimes and agree with everything he is saying here.

To add to his statement; a couple of the guys skate inlines and I have yet to see them do a serious hockey stop. I've seen the experienced kids do it on inlines but not us old farts. So they really don't have a choice but anticipate.

I tend to skate a little more risky and rely on hockey stops to sluff off speed in a pinch. But I also skate a slightly harder wheel which decreases control when reaching max speed. So its a trade-off.

A guy I skate with does the suicide stop and it looks awesome. But he uses wood wheels. He does some other cool moves too that the wheels allow. When he really gets going you can smell the wood wheels burning.
Great story!

I stay clear of Inlines, their stance is often much wider and less predictable (more erratic, at least with some). I've been knocked down twice (in a year) with a side swipes, now I keep my distance!
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Old December 9th, 2017, 01:38 PM   #17
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Great story!

I stay clear of Inlines, their stance is often much wider and less predictable (more erratic, at least with some). I've been knocked down twice (in a year) with a side swipes, now I keep my distance!
One of our group was in front of me, I was closing pretty fast and came up behind him on his blind side(outside). I scrubbed off some speed because of us both coming up on traffic and so I remained just to his right. He kicked out and down I went, he skates inlines.

Be careful to not get too close and especially if they do not know you are there. Its common to "time" your directions to move into an area someone is in now, anticipating their next push to the side. AS they move over in their push(say to the left) , you go right by them(on their right) or even at times move with them as they come back(to the right) during a push(you move right with them). Still going past them.

Don't try this if you aren't experienced yet, it can work out to be a disaster.. LOL.
Also, pay attention to people on the floor, as you get experience you will learn to recognize certain skaters. Whether they skate smooth or erratic, whether to be able to predict their actions or learn to stay away from them entirely. Some weekends the floor is like a pool table on the break and sometimes it is tame, predictable and very fast!

Most of all, observation is going to keep you out of trouble the best. So if a person is not skating without thinking, instead leaning and looking at their skates and feet, no need in using any of this. Your attention should be on traffic and the floor.

We have a lot of fun and that is what keeps us coming back to the rinks. Everyone is like, "ya'll coming back next weekend right?" People become skaters when they actually don't think about where their skates and feet are, but are looking around skating and having fun without thinking. Once you reach that level, skating is so much fun, even for me at 57 YO. The skaters out there do not realize that the kids are watching you more than you think. They really like watching skaters and come up all the time to let you know they are watchin too. The better you get at it, the better they try to get too. So when you get your timing, movements and anticipation right, you look smooth as silk on the floor. Making it look like there is nothing to it....
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Old December 10th, 2017, 03:49 AM   #18
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"People become skaters when they actually don't think about where their skates and feet are, but are looking around skating and having fun without thinking."

This started happening for me about a month ago (rexing aside) over a 3 hour session one night and first time with noise canceling headphones and my own music. Just flying through space and time. I have not heard anyone one talk of it, but I think there is a skaters high too, just like runners.

Here in San Diego we basically only have SkateWorld on adult night once a week. Last week I drove to Epic Rollertainment, 120 miles round trip to Murrieta, CA. Crazy right? Shocked to find almost a dozen of them were from
SkateWorld too! For some of us it is clearly addictive, even at 59! Good chance I will likely make that 120 mile trip again this week.

Thanks again for your suggestions, I will definitely try to stay out of trouble
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Old December 10th, 2017, 09:00 AM   #19
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Smile Great Post! My thoughts/two cents worth...lol!

I don't think I could stop skating backwards if my life depended on it. And I'm like most who turn around and stop skating forwards using a "T" stop motion.

But lets say you are in a panic situation and you must stop skating backwards to avoid a fall or avoid crashing into someone. You could fall yourself. That's right intentionally fall to avoid crashing into someone else. It's better to fall where somebody isn't, rather than crashing into somebody and hurting them, yourself or both.

So, if you know you are going to crash into somebody or something, look for a place to fall that doesn't have anybody in it, or is not in the flow of traffic.
I think most people who are great skaters know instinctively where to fall to avoid the most pain and agony from a crash. Not to mention knowing how to fall could avoid a lot of pain and injury!

One last tactic I have used on more than one occasion and it seems to work, but you must be a good skater to do this. And that is to grab the person you are going to crash into. At that moment of impact or crash, grab that person and hold yourself and that other person up, until you are both stabilized and then let go after both of you have regained your balance. You got to know what you are doing and have confidence in your own balance and your ability to hold somebody else up too!

One last point, the emotional high of roller skating.

To me there is nothing more fun than rexing and rexing with a group of other people is the epitome of skating. At regionalís this year I attended a skating session only for artistic skaters. So everybody skating that session was an experienced skater.

I found myself in the wake of two other younger skaters. Iím 62 and these two other skaters, one boy and girl looked like they were in their teensÖ.very young skaters. We were flying high and fast. It took two laps before they knew I was behind them. I could literally touch those skaters and we were skating fast and too the music.

When they noticed I was right behind them, they couldnít believe it. If you are good you can skate on someoneís tail, and they wontí even know you are there.

The idea is to get into the "Grove" of the music, mimic the skaters steps in front of you and follow them in line. That is the most fun!

Larry O and happy rexing.
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Old December 11th, 2017, 12:36 AM   #20
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I don't think I could stop skating backwards if my life depended on it. And I'm like most who turn around and stop skating forwards using a "T" stop motion.

But lets say you are in a panic situation and you must stop skating backwards to avoid a fall or avoid crashing into someone. You could fall yourself. That's right intentionally fall to avoid crashing into someone else. It's better to fall where somebody isn't, rather than crashing into somebody and hurting them, yourself or both.

So, if you know you are going to crash into somebody or something, look for a place to fall that doesn't have anybody in it, or is not in the flow of traffic.
I think most people who are great skaters know instinctively where to fall to avoid the most pain and agony from a crash. Not to mention knowing how to fall could avoid a lot of pain and injury!

One last tactic I have used on more than one occasion and it seems to work, but you must be a good skater to do this. And that is to grab the person you are going to crash into. At that moment of impact or crash, grab that person and hold yourself and that other person up, until you are both stabilized and then let go after both of you have regained your balance. You got to know what you are doing and have confidence in your own balance and your ability to hold somebody else up too!

One last point, the emotional high of roller skating.

To me there is nothing more fun than rexing and rexing with a group of other people is the epitome of skating. At regional’s this year I attended a skating session only for artistic skaters. So everybody skating that session was an experienced skater.

I found myself in the wake of two other younger skaters. I’m 62 and these two other skaters, one boy and girl looked like they were in their teens….very young skaters. We were flying high and fast. It took two laps before they knew I was behind them. I could literally touch those skaters and we were skating fast and too the music.

When they noticed I was right behind them, they couldn’t believe it. If you are good you can skate on someone’s tail, and they wont’ even know you are there.

The idea is to get into the "Grove" of the music, mimic the skaters steps in front of you and follow them in line. That is the most fun!

Larry O and happy rexing.

Love your post! This Thread started with a simple question, but it has evolved into so much more. It has shed much light on how skaters avoid trouble and their actual thought process. I am now more inspired than ever to become a true rexer! Thanks!

"You could fall yourself." True chivalry in skating!

And yes, I absolutely agree with you that it is much better to avoid an accident by taking the person in front of you with if you can. I think it is way safer for both than an uncontrolled crash. Ever skater should know how to do this because it's going to happen and more than once.

I don't know that my method is the best way, but it is a good starting place
for newbies reading this post. Please ring in if you have a better way or additional suggestions, or if I made an error. I think it is a good thing to include.

Unless I have no choice and have to do something different, I TRY to do the following for straight on crash behind a skater:

No time to slow, it going to happen: Bend your knees even more for increased stability and so your arms are closer to their center of gravity.

Extend your arms, but don't lock them as you want them to absorb some of the shock. Grab their waist or hips (if you can), arms, shoulders are way more likely to knock them off balance or freak them out.

Also grabbing the waist or hips "feels" intentional, controlled. If done correctly, you skate with them for a few seconds, say "sorry about that!" and it's over. I learned how to this because other people did it to me!
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