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Quad Roller Skating Forum Discussions about quad roller skates and any other quad skating discussions that do not seem appropriate for one of our other forums.

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Old September 5th, 2018, 10:39 PM   #1
Dionysus
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Unhappy Advice needed

I've been inline speed skating for years, but just tried outdoor quad skating and can't go more than a few meters without stumbling.

I've only fallen once in the last 20 or so outdoor inline speed skate sessions, but fell about 3 times in a half hour outdoors on new quad skates. This is way more than I fell when starting on inline skates. I'd just received new outdoor quad skates, which are a great fit, with outdoor durometer wheels (Bont Athena plates, Radar Flyer 78a wheels) It seems like every tiny pebble creates a much bigger impact than on inline skates. The forward and backward force when hitting any small bump or unevenness on the ground feels 10x greater than on speed skates.

Has anyone experienced this and been able to overcome it? It doesn't seem surmountable - doubt I'll ever feel as stable as I do on inline skates. Massively disappointed, and wondering if I need to give up on the idea of quads and return for a refund. I'd skated indoors on quad skates and thoroughly enjoyed it. Are they only good for indoors? It feels like the skates are not suitable for outdoor skating.
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Old September 6th, 2018, 12:08 AM   #2
sk84luv
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Default What Did You Expect

It's all about the surface. You can't expect a smooth ride on quads outdoors unless you are skating on clean concrete, asphalt, etc..

You don't notice it on inline wheels because there is very little contact with the surface compared to quad wheels.

One helpful thing is to mount your boots so the ball of your foot is slightly behind the axle. This will make it less likely for you to face plant when encountering foreign objects.
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Old September 6th, 2018, 06:02 AM   #3
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Hmmmmm. I think it's easier on whatever you're used to. I skated on quads outdoors my whole childhood before inlines were invented/marketed. As soon as inlines were invented I never looked back at quads. The ride was so much smoother.

I will quad skate outside now, but it has to be SMOOTH with good visibility. This is fun in Central Park, but not upstate where I live. If I go outside up here, I have to use my inline skates, (the converted train bridge I skate on has expansion joints). On quads that's a nightmare, you can't just zone out and skate like on inlines.

I have one friend in Central Park that uses smallish inline wheels on his quads, but it's hard because you can hit the wheels on the sole of the skate.

How do you do while skating with the quads in the rink? Is your balance really good yet? Sometimes when switching from quads to inlines, it can take a month or two to really get your balance and feel amazing. Maybe then you'll feel better outside. Tell us more about your quad experience. What kind are you skating on? How long have you skated quads?
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Old September 6th, 2018, 09:56 AM   #4
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just maybe some good outdoor wheels will make a difference, wider and softer
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Old September 6th, 2018, 06:39 PM   #5
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^^^^^ What he said
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Old September 6th, 2018, 11:21 PM   #6
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Quads have shorter wheel bases than inlines, and the contact points are in parallel, so they’re less stable to begin with. Add larger surface areas with the wider wheels and it gets even more unstable.

I run a smooth asphalt rail trail that has seven wooden bridges and I have to be extremely cautious when I use my quads. Otherwise, I can skate relatively quickly (16-17mph avg w/ tip speeds in the low 20s) on them.
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Old September 7th, 2018, 10:05 AM   #7
freeislandsk8tr
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Default Different skates different feel

I usually skate on Skorpion skates, which though they are laid out in a four wheel configuration, the brake is on the rear of the right skate and the wheels are inline wheels.

I like them since there is less strain on my ankles when coasting or standing.

My skate club president claims my skates are what slow me down, (my average speed is about 5 mph). (I personally think Im just slow).

In any case I bought some speed skates since I wanted the brakes that come with them for going down hill in San Francisco.

When I started skating on them I found that I was unsteady on them at first and they seemed to have a tendency to wander off to the side as I stroked.

So I believe that what you have encountered is the different feel of a different skate. As you practice more with these new skates you will gather confidence and plant your face less.

happy skating.
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Old September 7th, 2018, 01:12 PM   #8
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Now you know first hand why Inline skates took over the racing world.
Roller skates are great for dancing around slowly.

I had a set of radar “Flat out” outdoor wheels, the hubs were terrible, like rubber, the wouldn’t roll at all, the urethane was plastic.
If you plan on more outdoor roller skating, I’d grab any “bones” outdoor wheels, lots of choices, at least try a wheel that works properly, as far as axle placement, no reason to use a different setup than indoors, and both setups would have the front axle more toward the big toe than under the front ball of the foot so you can roll over stuff.

I have to wonder why fast inline skaters don’t get on a bicycle and really go fast

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Old September 7th, 2018, 04:02 PM   #9
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nobody has yet said anything about the PRIMARY reason quads are 'trippy-er' than inlines.

Current inline wheels are much larger in diameter than quad wheels. Because of simple physics... larger diameters are able to get over small debris much more easily. You can visualize this by imagining a rock about 1/4 inch in size (6.4mm) and three wheels of various (slightly absurd, just for this example) diameters... 20mm, 100mm, 200mm. It should be easy to visualize that the 20mm wheel would get stopped dead in place by the rock, the 100mm wheel would have trouble and the 200mm wheel would roll over it.

when I started speed skating we were on 90mm wheels and our group was always getting tripped up by trail debris. When we transitioned to 100s and then 110s the trails "got better". Now those of us who are on 125s are almost immune to trail debris.

Of course, wheelbase length does make a minor positive contribution... but the primary factor is wheel diameter.
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Old September 8th, 2018, 06:22 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rwsz View Post
just maybe some good outdoor wheels will make a difference, wider and softer
Yes!

My faves are Krypto Route 70s. BIG, heavy and absorb a lot of roughness. If you look through the Outdoor Quads forum you will find a lot of different possibilities but for me the Routes are hard to beat.

When skating outdoors be sure to adopt a fore/aft stance with your skates. If you have your skates side by side when you hit a object or crack it will happen to both skates at the same time. NOT GOOD! If instead you keep one skate ahead of the other you increase chances that hitting something won't cause a fall.

.
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Old September 9th, 2018, 12:10 AM   #11
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Default Big outdoor wheels

Quote:
Originally Posted by rwsz View Post
just maybe some good outdoor wheels will make a difference, wider and softer
Yep. And if you have a choice between wider or taller, go for taller. The larger the wheel diameter, the better the wheel will roll over small obstacles.
If you can, mount your plates conservatively towards the rear of your boots.
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Old September 9th, 2018, 10:51 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunnyape View Post
Yep. And if you have a choice between wider or taller, go for taller. The larger the wheel diameter, the better the wheel will roll over small obstacles.
If you can, mount your plates conservatively towards the rear of your boots.
good info
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Old September 14th, 2018, 04:03 PM   #13
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Default Yep, taller good call

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Old September 14th, 2018, 06:07 PM   #14
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I actually run a set of 80a 70mm longboard wheels on my quads when I skate outdoors. Much better over bumps and sticks.

https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B00HVQI8ZK

They are back-set, meaning that the inside bearing is just about flush with the inside if the inside of the wheel. However, since they are longboard wheels, the bearing spacing is 2mm wider than roller skate wheels are. I have had to use blue loctite on the axle nuts to keep them from spinning off during use.

There's a good thread on outdoor wheels here: http://www.skatelogforum.com/forums/...outdoor+wheels

Photo of what the RAD wheels look like mounted here: http://www.skatelogforum.com/forums/...&postcount=214 (these aren't mine, but they are actually the same boots and plates that I have).
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Old September 15th, 2018, 03:45 PM   #15
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quad roller skates are mainly based on the performance of the wheels. Currently, they are used to meet the shock and speed. Two types of wheels are used, one is 78A, 75mm, and the other is 85A, 65mm.The contact faces of both wheels are 35mm.

In my opinion, with the right wheels, there is no outdoor restriction on the quad roller skating.
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Old September 15th, 2018, 11:14 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chuckboucher View Post

Photo of what the RAD wheels look like mounted here: http://www.skatelogforum.com/forums/...&postcount=214 (these aren't mine, but they are actually the same boots and plates that I have).
Since then I've moved those RAD Glides over to my general skates, which have soccer boots and Swift plates with softer cushions:





Heavier than the Bonts + PowerTracs, but more manoeuvrable and I don't care about getting them dirty.
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Old September 15th, 2018, 11:58 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunnyape View Post
Since then I've moved those RAD Glides over to my general skates, which have soccer boots and Swift plates with softer cushions:





Heavier than the Bonts + PowerTracs, but more manoeuvrable and I don't care about getting them dirty.
My wheels (65mm,85A)just like this.I used it indoor and outdoor.I like it.
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