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Old June 30th, 2009, 06:53 PM   #101
Skateguy
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Rout 70 Krytos, or even smaller, depending on your body mass. Once the rain washes off the street oils, they actually stick better in the rain, than on dry land. Just like licking your finger, then rubbing a balloon. we Skate in the rain, and create big "Rooster tails"---This is when you learn to appreciate "Hartford gold bearings" they just never freeze up. Run em dry, or with boat trailer axle bearing grease. It makes no difference. they just keep on rollin. Not real fast, maybe, but who cares. Who's racin? It's about the trip, not the finish line.
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Old June 30th, 2009, 06:57 PM   #102
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gem View Post
yes Roller▀lades are inline skates and yes with the hard shell boot it will give you plenty of ankle support. However since you are still worried about yor ankle support for outdoor use, . . . maybe the Quadline high boot with the 90mm wheels will be more of what yor looking for:


or even more support with wide trucks and 100mm wheels:
Nice--now put a real set of Outdoor wheels on there, and ya got something. Inline wheels work best, inline. On their own, they have to small a contact patch. ---I got 200, 104mm inline wheels for anyone who wants to find out what I paid to find out. "Like Skatin in mud"
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Old February 27th, 2010, 04:32 PM   #103
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kufman View Post
In my experience, more wheels results in a smoother ride rather than fewer. With only two wheels, both wheels will fall into cracks in lets say the sidewalk when traveling perpendicular to the cracks. First the front wheel then the back wheel. With 4 wheels, you can bridge the gap and basically never feel the cracks in the sidewalk. The first wheels goes over the crack, but it does not fall in because only 25% of you weight is on that wheel. By the time the first wheel hits the next patch of pavement, the 2nd wheel will be over the crack, but it does not fall in because the 1st, 3rd and 4th are supporting the weight.
[SNIP]
Anyway, some food for thought.
Well said. That's a good explanation of the advantage of 4 wheels over 2. I think I've maybe reached the best compromise for smoothness on variable tarmac with 4 x 90mm Hyper X360 wheels per Powerslide boot http://www.henniker.org.uk/html/_personal_skating3.htm
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Old February 28th, 2010, 12:25 AM   #104
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Henniker View Post
Well said. That's a good explanation of the advantage of 4 wheels over 2. I think I've maybe reached the best compromise for smoothness on variable tarmac with 4 x 90mm Hyper X360 wheels per Powerslide boot http://www.henniker.org.uk/html/_personal_skating3.htm
Kufman's explanation is just one of the reasons. There are so many more. Where you consider using the same size wheels (ie. all 2 x 80 vs 4 x 80)

- more wheels is faster
- more wheels grips better
- more wheels steer and carve better

This comes largely from my aggressive skating experience. When I first started agressive skating, I change my rec skates from flat 4 x80 to anti-rocker 2 x 80 with grind wheels in the middle. It was terrible to skate on but made it easier to grind. Similar scenario with my first real aggressive skates. They were 4 x 58 and I went anti-rocket with them. Same result as the change with my rec skates.

Now, there is a trade off when the wheels get bigger. 4 x 100 has proved to be faster than 5 x 80. I don't know what the change is in maneuverability, so perhaps a few people that have made that switch can tell us. (I don't use my speed skates much, so I cannot justify making a change...but Bont semi-races keep calling my name).

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Old February 28th, 2010, 02:46 AM   #105
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Default It is NOT the # of wheels - it's the # of AXLES!!

With TWO or LESS axles, encountering surface imperfections that drop downward causes support for front wheel(s) to vanish. Lacking wheel support, the wheel AND front axle BOTH must drop, TILTING PLATE DOWNWARD IN FRONT toward bottom of surface imperfection (crack, hole, etc.). Once wheel reaches bottom, and upward force needed for wheel to be "pushed back up" and out of hole/crack starts to build up, at this moment is when the wheel stuck effect kicks in. To get the wheel back up and out of the hole/crack, a greater upward force than the weight on the wheel is needed. So, some horizontal momentum gets stolen and converted into upward vertical force to drive the wheel back up from the hole crack. Good rebound wheels accomplish this with less momentum lost, but some momentum is always lost. This creates a distinct breaking effect and shifts more of your weight forward onto the stuck axle.
If the imperfection is minimum, the amount/duration of breaking is small/short and the wheel quickly rises out of the hole/crack. If the surface imperfection is serious, its braking effect can cause such a rapid weight shift onto the front axle that the the upward force needed to lift the wheel out builds up too slowly relative to the weight that is pitching forward onto the axle from the braking action. The technical name for this is Positive Feedback - as more weight shifts onto stuck axle/wheel it sticks more, more braking results, sending even more weight forward, increased weight forward on stuck wheel/axle makes it stick even more........ Can you say FACE PLANT?

Now, with the # of AXLES AT 3 or MORE, when the front wheel passes the hole/crack and upward force on wheel vanishes, ONLY the small amount of wheel compression can expand downward into the crack/hole - THE PLATE DOES NOT TILT DOWNWARD!. The remaining two supported axles prevent this. Thus, very little momentum is lost only to re-compress the wheel's urethane as it reaches the other side of the hole/crack. Each of the remaining 3, 4, 5 axles then complete this same transition WITHOUT DROPPING DOWN into the hole/crack.

This is the primary advantage of Inline skates on rough outdoor surfaces. Without a third axle, Quads cannot overcome this advantage.
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Old March 1st, 2010, 06:31 PM   #106
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Armadillo View Post
With TWO or LESS axles, encountering surface imperfections that drop downward causes support for front wheel(s) to vanish. Lacking wheel support, the wheel AND front axle BOTH must drop, TILTING PLATE DOWNWARD IN FRONT toward bottom of surface imperfection (crack, hole, etc.). Once wheel reaches bottom, and upward force needed for wheel to be "pushed back up" and out of hole/crack starts to build up, at this moment is when the wheel stuck effect kicks in. To get the wheel back up and out of the hole/crack, a greater upward force than the weight on the wheel is needed. So, some horizontal momentum gets stolen and converted into upward vertical force to drive the wheel back up from the hole crack. Good rebound wheels accomplish this with less momentum lost, but some momentum is always lost. This creates a distinct breaking effect and shifts more of your weight forward onto the stuck axle.
If the imperfection is minimum, the amount/duration of breaking is small/short and the wheel quickly rises out of the hole/crack. If the surface imperfection is serious, its braking effect can cause such a rapid weight shift onto the front axle that the the upward force needed to lift the wheel out builds up too slowly relative to the weight that is pitching forward onto the axle from the braking action. The technical name for this is Positive Feedback - as more weight shifts onto stuck axle/wheel it sticks more, more braking results, sending even more weight forward, increased weight forward on stuck wheel/axle makes it stick even more........ Can you say FACE PLANT?

Now, with the # of AXLES AT 3 or MORE, when the front wheel passes the hole/crack and upward force on wheel vanishes, ONLY the small amount of wheel compression can expand downward into the crack/hole - THE PLATE DOES NOT TILT DOWNWARD!. The remaining two supported axles prevent this. Thus, very little momentum is lost only to re-compress the wheel's urethane as it reaches the other side of the hole/crack. Each of the remaining 3, 4, 5 axles then complete this same transition WITHOUT DROPPING DOWN into the hole/crack.

This is the primary advantage of Inline skates on rough outdoor surfaces. Without a third axle, Quads cannot overcome this advantage.
This is what I was thinking when I wrote my post, but it didn't come out as well as you have posted it. Thanks!
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Old March 3rd, 2010, 09:10 PM   #107
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back on track

landroller mojos - they are very specific in that they arent a do it all skate

inlines are better at maneuverability and speed - quads are better for any type of rink skating...

if you are going to be outside, on not the smoothest of roads - then the mojos are really quite fascinating...

i can transition over all sorts of surfaces and feel confident...

all that being said - $200 is a lot for a skate which is specific to rougher roads but doesn't out perform quads or inlines in general

build quality is top notch and the boot is very supportive and comfortable as far as high ankle boots go

the bearings and wheels and boot are all replaceable - i've taken the boot fully out of the shell and ive also removed the frame and wheel and attached a speed inline frame and wheels - very comfy and now i have dual duty skates that are as easy as pie to transform into either landrollers or inlines

all in all i like my landrollers and would make the purchase again, quality hardware that will last, and a product that delivers where they say they do
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Old March 28th, 2010, 02:53 PM   #108
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I have purchased a pair of Mojos because it appeared that the large wheels would let me skate in rougher terrain. I have encountered a problem that I get burning pain in the heel area after skating for 10 minutes. The longer I have used them the worse the pain gets. I have had 3 pairs of Rollerblade Inline size 11 and all fit well and never had a problem with heel pain. The Landrollers have a much stronger/tighter plastic heel cup that seems to be the culprit.

Can anyone suggest a solution?

I have $200 in these skates and hate to throw them away but I don't have a solution.

Is it possible that I can stretch the heels?

BTW I have e-mailed Landroller twice with no response.
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