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Beginning Skaters Forum This is the place for beginning skaters to ask questions and share their stories. We would love to hear about your experiences learning to skate. No question is too dumb!

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Old June 16th, 2007, 07:34 AM   #1
SantoAngelo
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Default Hi, Im Super New To This & So I Have A Skate Question?

I have recently been very intrigued by the whole "freestyle rolling" scene. The individuality and self expression in the sport seems supernatural. However I'm currently 22 somewhat overweight but still athletic. Ive recently started implementing a healthier eating habits and exercise into my life. I'm really looking into jumping into the skating scene. I went to look at skates today and the sales man didn't seem to know to much about the skates. So basically I really like the look of hockey roller skates, but being new to all this I don't know what to think of it all. Would hockey roller skates be a good choice to start?. The selection of brands in my area are Nike, k2, and Rollerblades for the "higher end" stuff. Ive read through a lot of the post's and I'm not trying to jump into tricks I just want to learn how to skate well and go from there. One of my main concerns was my health status I'm currently in but I'm willing to look past that and have some fun.

My Names Santo Angelo by the way I'm a Independent Music Producer from Vancouver BC. I'm looking to make some friends along my journey into the skate scene so don't be shy to hit me up with a msg. Thank you

Edit** The term freestyle rolling was thrown out of ignorance. But I guess at the end of the day the term doesn't matter. However I now understand its a modernized terminology of aggressive skating. I hope I didn't make any one upset at the end of the day I am very new to this. I guess Freestyle rolling is a marketing thing for the "urban" market of incline skating. However I have noticed that the places I went too. Do not carry aggressive skates is it smart to learn initially on aggressive skates? and Ive noticed smaller wheels and only 2 of them on some aggressive skates. Any thoughts?

Last edited by SantoAngelo; June 16th, 2007 at 02:47 PM.
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Old June 16th, 2007, 06:58 PM   #2
Rods
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Santo Angelo,

I'd post this again, or similar in the Aggressive section of this forum. I think you'd probably get a more informed response in that specialized section. Not to say, you won't here, but I'm sure you know what I mean. Good luck.

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Old June 16th, 2007, 07:16 PM   #3
HVSkater
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Originally Posted by SantoAngelo View Post
I have recently been very intrigued by the whole "freestyle rolling" scene. The individuality and self expression in the sport seems supernatural. However I'm currently 22 somewhat overweight but still athletic. Ive recently started implementing a healthier eating habits and exercise into my life. I'm really looking into jumping into the skating scene. I went to look at skates today and the sales man didn't seem to know to much about the skates. So basically I really like the look of hockey roller skates, but being new to all this I don't know what to think of it all. Would hockey roller skates be a good choice to start?. The selection of brands in my area are Nike, k2, and Rollerblades for the "higher end" stuff. Ive read through a lot of the post's and I'm not trying to jump into tricks I just want to learn how to skate well and go from there. One of my main concerns was my health status I'm currently in but I'm willing to look past that and have some fun.

My Names Santo Angelo by the way I'm a Independent Music Producer from Vancouver BC. I'm looking to make some friends along my journey into the skate scene so don't be shy to hit me up with a msg. Thank you

Edit** The term freestyle rolling was thrown out of ignorance. But I guess at the end of the day the term doesn't matter. However I now understand its a modernized terminology of aggressive skating. I hope I didn't make any one upset at the end of the day I am very new to this. I guess Freestyle rolling is a marketing thing for the "urban" market of incline skating. However I have noticed that the places I went too. Do not carry aggressive skates is it smart to learn initially on aggressive skates? and Ive noticed smaller wheels and only 2 of them on some aggressive skates. Any thoughts?
Freestyle skating--this is somewhat of a fuzzy term. It actually refers to slalom skating, but is a term that is also used for general urban skating in which the skater is doing "fun stuff" (tricks, jumps, spins, etc) along the way and not just plodding along like a fitness skater in the forward position. But it's not quite aggressive skating either--freestyle and aggressive are generally considered to be two different disciplines. I'd say aggressive is much more physical; freestyle is more artsy and finesse skating--almost a "street version" of artistic or figure skating.

If you think you will get into freestyle skating (of either variety) in the future, look for an inline skate with a short frame. Something like the Rollerblade Twister, Seba High, or Powerslide Cell 2/Maven/Hardcore 1100. This allows for much improved turning, slalom, and easier tricks such as jumps, spins, slides, etc. Since I've gotten mine, I would never even consider using a typical fitness skate--the freestyle skates just feel so... free! I also use inline speed skates, so I'm not really biased: it's just that I think a skate should be used what it's designed for and it sounds like a freestyle skate may suit your needs in the future. You can certainly just skate along the trail or road like any other skate--but you can really get great response from them when you decide to start working on the funner stuff. So what I'm saying is, for the kinds of things you say you might want to work into, you won't outgrow these skates (fresstyle skates).

Aggressive skates are great for aggressive skating (grinds, etc), but don't do as well for general urban skating, cruising, or freestyle stuff.

Here's an amazing skater showing true freestyle (slalom) skating: Amazing freestyle slalom skater
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Old June 19th, 2007, 09:24 PM   #4
jneane
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Originally Posted by HVSkater View Post
Freestyle skating--this is somewhat of a fuzzy term. It actually refers to slalom skating, but is a term that is also used for general urban skating in which the skater is doing "fun stuff" (tricks, jumps, spins, etc) along the way and not just plodding along like a fitness skater in the forward position. But it's not quite aggressive skating either--freestyle and aggressive are generally considered to be two different disciplines. I'd say aggressive is much more physical; freestyle is more artsy and finesse skating--almost a "street version" of artistic or figure skating.

If you think you will get into freestyle skating (of either variety) in the future, look for an inline skate with a short frame. Something like the Rollerblade Twister, Seba High, or Powerslide Cell 2/Maven/Hardcore 1100. This allows for much improved turning, slalom, and easier tricks such as jumps, spins, slides, etc. Since I've gotten mine, I would never even consider using a typical fitness skate--the freestyle skates just feel so... free! I also use inline speed skates, so I'm not really biased: it's just that I think a skate should be used what it's designed for and it sounds like a freestyle skate may suit your needs in the future. You can certainly just skate along the trail or road like any other skate--but you can really get great response from them when you decide to start working on the funner stuff. So what I'm saying is, for the kinds of things you say you might want to work into, you won't outgrow these skates (fresstyle skates).

Aggressive skates are great for aggressive skating (grinds, etc), but don't do as well for general urban skating, cruising, or freestyle stuff.

Here's an amazing skater showing true freestyle (slalom) skating: Amazing freestyle slalom skater
Thanks HVskater! I just posted a similar question, should of read this first. The Rollerblade Twister, I noticed is a men's skate, do you think women can use it also? I really don't know what they always have 2 categories, one for men and one for women, are the skates really differently made. All the ones I seem to like are for men.
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Old June 20th, 2007, 06:56 AM   #5
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Thanks HVskater! I just posted a similar question, should of read this first. The Rollerblade Twister, I noticed is a men's skate, do you think women can use it also? I really don't know what they always have 2 categories, one for men and one for women, are the skates really differently made. All the ones I seem to like are for men.
Hi jneane,

Actually the Twisters are for both men and women. They just sell them sized as men's (not sure why, probably economics), so you would just buy sized down roughly one number (for instance: if you are woman's size 7.5, you should be fine with men's 6.5).

The frames on the twister are 250mm which is sort of at the long end of the spectrum for slalom, especially if you are light and small-footed, but they are really the only choice in the US besides the Powerslide Cell 2. I haven't tried the Twister (I have the Cell 2), but it seems really popular for slalom skaters and even if it is a bit long for lighter skaters (doing slalom), it's still going to be way better than a rec/fitness skate. The short framed inlines are really great for quick turning, but you can still cruise with them--they feel wonderful. Once you've been on a pair, I'd doubt that you'd want longer ones unless you are going for speed skates and racing.

If you do have smaller feet and want to get a shorter frame, you could look at the Powerslide Cell 2 (243mm frame and available at Skates.com) or Seba skates--but you'd have to order those from Canada or Europe. Roughly, I think anything below men's size 11 or so and above 8 puts the desired frame length at 243mm. And if your feet are smaller than men's 7.5, the optimum frame size is at 231mm. But again, the 250mm (only 1 or 2 cm difference)frame on the Twister will be WAY better than typical inline frames for slalom.
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Old June 20th, 2007, 03:41 PM   #6
jneane
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Hi jneane,

Actually the Twisters are for both men and women. They just sell them sized as men's (not sure why, probably economics), so you would just buy sized down roughly one number (for instance: if you are woman's size 7.5, you should be fine with men's 6.5).

The frames on the twister are 250mm which is sort of at the long end of the spectrum for slalom, especially if you are light and small-footed, but they are really the only choice in the US besides the Powerslide Cell 2. I haven't tried the Twister (I have the Cell 2), but it seems really popular for slalom skaters and even if it is a bit long for lighter skaters (doing slalom), it's still going to be way better than a rec/fitness skate. The short framed inlines are really great for quick turning, but you can still cruise with them--they feel wonderful. Once you've been on a pair, I'd doubt that you'd want longer ones unless you are going for speed skates and racing.

If you do have smaller feet and want to get a shorter frame, you could look at the Powerslide Cell 2 (243mm frame and available at Skates.com) or Seba skates--but you'd have to order those from Canada or Europe. Roughly, I think anything below men's size 11 or so and above 8 puts the desired frame length at 243mm. And if your feet are smaller than men's 7.5, the optimum frame size is at 231mm. But again, the 250mm (only 1 or 2 cm difference)frame on the Twister will be WAY better than typical inline frames for slalom.
Wow, thanks for all that info. I wear a size 7 US womens, and I weigh 125, so I am thinking the Twisters might be a little long for me, looks like maybe I should get the Powerslide Cell 2 because of the frame size. I still really would prefer the Seba, but way to pricey for me right now.... Now what about putting smaller frames on the Twisters? Is that possible? Just think a week ago I had no clue about frame sizes, wheels, etc... I learned alot from this forum.
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