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Old December 28th, 2013, 08:11 PM   #1
DeathPanda
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Default If you could go back in time and give advice to yourself as a novice skater?

I always find this kind of question to be good for anyone starting out in a specific subject. As I'm just starting out with quad skating and quite wobbly in the balance department...! I thought I'd ask it to see what kind of good/funny advice is out there to help newcomers find their feet

If you could go back in time to the day you first put on your skates and started wobbling about, what advice would you give yourself to help you to grow faster in confidence?
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Old December 29th, 2013, 12:43 AM   #2
DannyBoySk8s
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Default Safety First!

In my green days, when I started skating virtually no one on the floor wore safety gear!

When I started back skating it didnít occur to me to wear safety gear. Shortly thereafter and in succession I sprained both wrists and then my right thumb. I bruised my knee and then hit my head.

How did this happen you ask? My wheel hit a hair pin on the floor and I fell backwards. My wheel hit an earring on the floor and I fell sideways. My wheel hit an earbud on the floor and I fell sideways. Consequently I learned to wear safety gear!

I would tell my younger self to wear a helmet, elbow pads, wrist guards and some low profile knee pads. I would suggest that safety gear would prevent injury when accidently falling on the concrete floor. I would suggest that wearing safety gear would give me confidence to attempt maneuvers that I would not otherwise attempt to do. I would argue that enjoyment of the skate experience would be increased exponential when wearing safety gear by not having to take time out due to injuries that require extended recovery time.

Cheers,

Dan
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Old December 29th, 2013, 01:14 AM   #3
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Default give up other stuff/ hobbies

I would have stopped smoking and drinking 11 years earlier.
I would have kept on skating even when skating stopped being the cool thing to do.I would have worked out and ate more healthily.And last but not least i would change how dependent i was on being in a larger group and done more things on my own.
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Old December 29th, 2013, 01:24 PM   #4
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Ha, first thing I learned was elbow and knee pads were useless, wrist pads very necessary.
Got caught in a high wind in the dark, took air from a little bump, about a 12" sucker, flew a long ways, came down and both elbow and knee pads had come off while in the air, landed on my wrists anyway, full frontal contact, hands first.

Knew that the best cushions, wheels and bearings available were necessary, waste of time using anything "lesser" (Gyros, clouds, ceramic when it became available), twas 40 years ago

Never wanted to skate indoors, still don't

Never would have spent a second skating without music, still won't

Got on ice skates when 3 years old, roller skating is easier never had to "learn"... just to "enjoy"

Don't need 20-20 rearward vision to not like "a contact sport" on roller skates but lemmings will be lemmings.
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Old December 29th, 2013, 11:12 PM   #5
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Hi DannyBoySk8s,

Quote:
When I started back skating it didn’t occur to me to wear safety gear.
Me either, back in 52/53. Only saw Helmets on the Derby Skaters on TV in 50's. Nobody else used anything back then.

Early 60's, got into Wrist Guards and Knee Braces only because of Tendonitis. (for 10yrs) Started the Knee and Elbow Pads in early 70's when I built my Stilt Skates - that seemed reasonable due to the 17.5" height I was adding to my 6'4" frame. I soon added the Hip & Coccyx Pads, after a few falls from those skates. All those Pads have Saved my body parts enumerable times since then, and they still do.

Quote:
I would tell my younger self to wear a helmet, elbow pads, wrist guards and some low profile knee pads. I would suggest that safety gear would prevent injury when accidently falling on the concrete floor. I would suggest that wearing safety gear would give me confidence to attempt maneuvers that I would not otherwise attempt to do. I would argue that enjoyment of the skate experience would be increased exponential when wearing safety gear by not having to take time out due to injuries that require extended recovery time.
This is pretty much what I tell everyone I meet that's over 30, and /or Coming Back. I'd have told myself about it at about age 10, if I'd had the chance. It's all even more important these days, with so many Rinks having Asphalt or Concrete Floors. Those Puppys are Body Breakers compared to the older uncoated Wood Floors of yesteryear.

I'd like to see folks continue Skating as long as possible. Kinda sad to be one of the few, if any, Skaters on the Floor over 65, at every Rink I go to. I really miss all those wonderful skaters from the 60's thru the 90's that don't Skate anymore.

Harold
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Old December 31st, 2013, 02:25 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DannyBoySk8s View Post
In my green days, when I started skating virtually no one on the floor wore safety gear! When I started back skating it didnít occur to me to wear safety gear. Shortly thereafter and in succession I sprained both wrists and then my right thumb. I bruised my knee and then hit my head. How did this happen you ask? My wheel hit a hair pin on the floor and I fell backwards. My wheel hit an earring on the floor and I fell sideways. My wheel hit an earbud on the floor and I fell sideways. Consequently I learned to wear safety gear! Cheers, Dan
In the How did this happen category did you skate on floors that had this much trash on them when you first started skating? I know the floors were kept much cleaner when I first started skating. It seems many rinks fail miserably in the cleanliness category and as skaters we pay the penalty with many falls and injuries. Should we as skaters be more demanding in asking for clean floors and safe skating conditions?
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Old December 31st, 2013, 03:44 AM   #7
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Default Rink Etiquette!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dennis Lauer View Post
In the How did this happen category I know the floors were kept much cleaner when I first started skating. It seems many rinks fail miserably in the cleanliness category and as skaters we pay the penalty with many falls and injuries. Should we as skaters be more demanding in asking for clean floors and safe skating conditions?
I suspect that our demands for clean floors would fall on deaf ears.Rink Operators and Staff appear to be more concerned with getting numbers up and not offending skaters by establishing and enforcing rink etiquette!I believe it's a joint responsibility shared between Rink Operators and Staff as well as Skaters. Perhaps the best we can do is set an example by picking up UFO's on the floor and educating our fellow users to do likewise. We are dealing with a new generation of skaters who evidently have not been educated in rink etiquette.

Cheers,

Dan
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Old December 31st, 2013, 04:15 AM   #8
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Hi Dennis & DannyBoySk8s,

Quote:
In the How did this happen category did you skate on floors that had this much trash on them when you first started skating? I know the floors were kept much cleaner when I first started skating. It seems many rinks fail miserably in the cleanliness category and as skaters we pay the penalty with many falls and injuries.
I started noticing this issue in the early 70's as the Competitive Skating declined in my area.

Quote:
I suspect that our demands for clean floors would fall on deaf ears. Rink Operators and Staff appear to be more concerned with getting numbers up and not offending skaters by establishing and enforcing rink etiquette! I believe it's a joint responsibility shared between Rink Operators and Staff as well as Skaters. Perhaps the best we can do is set an example by picking up UFO's on the floor and educating our fellow users to do likewise. We are dealing with a new generation of skaters who evidently have not been educated in rink etiquette.
This has been my experience over the last 40 yrs. Add to that, the Lower Liting and and Blasting Sound Systems - and those of us who still enjoy doing Dance, Jumping and Spinning are pretty much Screwed. Doing any of this stuff in the Dark is a B-I-T-C-H.

Harold
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Old December 31st, 2013, 05:35 AM   #9
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Default Fresh Meat/Session Skate Etiquette.

At the time of this post the personal and rink safety concerns enumerated were accurate.
The safety issues have since been addressed and therefore this post has become redundant.

Thanks,

Dan

Last edited by DannyBoySk8s; May 2nd, 2014 at 05:23 AM. Reason: Information Update
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Old December 31st, 2013, 06:18 PM   #10
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Edited out my original comment. It was rude of me to post off topic in response to someone else's off topic comment.

Advice to myself:
Don't stop skating as a young adult, and it'll be much easier to resume later on!
Wear pads/helmet on quads as well as on inlines. Ignore anyone who makes fun or says you shouldn't need protective gear.
Scout out good outdoor places to skate, because rink fees add up fast and skating outdoors is super fun.
Play with different wheels and cushions. They can dramatically change your skating experience.

Last edited by Pikaia; January 9th, 2014 at 01:51 PM.
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Old December 31st, 2013, 08:57 PM   #11
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The first thing would be to start earlier. Senior men is not the place to learn to race, even if you have ability, because so does everybody else. The second would be to try and think a little more about what you are doing, and why. It's ok to 'just do it', but then you can't try and change things a little to optimise training, setups, wheel types etc.
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Old January 2nd, 2014, 06:14 PM   #12
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I would tell myself to wear the correct wheel for the correct surface. I would also tell myself to find Roller Derby in my 20's not my late 30's
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Old January 2nd, 2014, 08:04 PM   #13
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I have no clue what I would tell myself. No one taught me how to skate and I have no clue how I learned lol, I just did.

I would probably tell myself to start with a looser action so that I can semi dictate which direction the skate goes instead of the other way around.
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Old January 2nd, 2014, 08:50 PM   #14
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Props to DeathPanda for asking this question. This is a really good question.

I would tell myself not to go to the rink when I was 12 years old that fateful day and broke my thumb.
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Old January 2nd, 2014, 09:49 PM   #15
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Default Stop knocking the teen girls down, They are being helpful

Well you asked,

I restarted the first time in Junior High, and often the gals my age who could skate good would grab me on either side and have me skate between them. It tended to dragging me and they would often leave me in a lump on the floor. So then I would chase them and try to knock them down as payback. Geez you can see I was a normal dumb boy.

SO, I should have embraced their help and of course their female hood.

Yours in Skating, MA/NY Skating Dave
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Old January 2nd, 2014, 10:02 PM   #16
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Default ASK Someone: Are these Skates OK

OK 2nd time Back,

Hey the floors changed and I was still skating on super hard wheels (phenolic) from the 1960s when they either used Rosin or SawDust on HardWood floors. And yes I stopped knocking down the teen gals and had fun with them instead. Hey McDonalds, a brand new burger place, or Carrols after skating with a gang of guys and gals in a car.

Well in the 1990s, I slid all over the place and could not get a good edge with those 1960s skates. Someone, maybe a rink manager, after months finally told me skating has changed and I had the wrong wheels. Someone else at another Rink told me I couldn't put wheels on my 1960s skates since the axles were wrong. {{Aside: they were wrong, yet I did not know}} so I became a Long_Term Renter.

SO, ASK Someone, and then ASK again, and again. Are my skates OK, Are my wheels OK? As we have learned on SLF experts who can fully adapt to your situation; whether they be rink owners, art teachers, or great skaters, are hard to find. So Ask and Ask again

Yours in Skating, MA/NY Skating Dave
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Old January 4th, 2014, 05:13 AM   #17
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1) learn how to fall in a controlled manner and without anxiety. (Which of course presupposes wearing the right gear).
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Old January 4th, 2014, 11:39 AM   #18
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Just to add a contrary opinion here, I've never felt the need for safety gear of any sort. I have a pair of wrist guards that I wear occasionally, but I learned how to skate, and how to fall, just fine without them. I've had a couple of minor injuries from skating, but protective gear wouldn't have helped in either instance.

I have nothing against safety gear, or the people that wear it. I just see it more as a personal choice than as a necessity. Of course, I'm also young enough that a few falls won't kill me. The type of skating I usually do is also relatively safe, I'd still wear safety gear for downhill or aggressive skating.
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Old January 4th, 2014, 01:11 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gotsk8s View Post
I have no clue what I would tell myself. No one taught me how to skate and I have no clue how I learned lol, I just did.

I would probably tell myself to start with a looser action so that I can semi dictate which direction the skate goes instead of the other way around.
I also dont remember learning how, save from trial and error. Many times I wonder why or how I'm still alive after some of the moronic crap us kids did. No on taught us how to skate, I probably went to the rink 12 times total until just the past 2 years. We barely had the money to buy gear let alone spend on sessions.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaw View Post
Just to add a contrary opinion here, I've never felt the need for safety gear of any sort. I have a pair of wrist guards that I wear occasionally, but I learned how to skate, and how to fall, just fine without them. I've had a couple of minor injuries from skating, but protective gear wouldn't have helped in either instance.

I have nothing against safety gear, or the people that wear it. I just see it more as a personal choice than as a necessity. Of course, I'm also young enough that a few falls won't kill me. The type of skating I usually do is also relatively safe, I'd still wear safety gear for downhill or aggressive skating.
Helmet and wristguards so important.. even though I almost never wear them. knees and elbows dont do much for me either. Sure they reduce scuffing of my skin should I fall, but I dont think they are worth their encumbrance.

Theres a local guy here who used to be a badass skateboarder, went to do a simple 50/50 grind on a low curb, messed up, slipped out and cracked his head open. Hes FUBAR for life now, totally messed his brain up.



Id want to write a little book and hand it to myself honestly, full of what to do, what not to do.
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Old January 4th, 2014, 05:13 PM   #20
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If they're so important, then why aren't you wearing them every time you go skating?

It's about risk isn't it? It's not that I think a helmet wouldn't help if a car hit me or I messed up and fell in a particularly bad fashion, but just that the likelihood of such things happening is low enough that I'm okay with the risk.

As for wrist guards, well, they're nice to have, but by the time I actually owned a pair I already knew how to pull off most intermediate slides, and this is how you learn slides:
http://v.youku.com/v_show/id_XMjYxNTE2Nzgw.html
You fall, and you fall, and you fall again, until you eventually get it right. Wrist guards and other pads sometimes help while learning, but I wouldn't consider them necessary. A controlled fall isn't much more traumatic than just sitting down on the ground from a crouched position, so even without wrist guards I've never seriously sprained my wrists while skating.

Edit: I don't see how writing a book would help. Younger me wouldn't have wanted to read a book on how to skate. My advice would simply be the same advice I always get when I ask someone who's really good for advice: work on your fundamentals. Skating on one leg backwards isn't hard. Skating on one leg backwards through 20 cones isn't hard. Skating on one legs backwards through twenty cones in a fluid motion while being truly in control for the entire 20 cones? That's a completely different story. Of course, this advice would've gone ignored as well, but the way I see it, so long as I'm having fun while skating then I'm doing it correctly.
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