S k a t e L o g     F o r u m
Inline Skating and Quad Roller Skating
Forum Hosts: Jessica Wright | Kathie Fry

FOLLOW US: Our Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Email    


Home - Forum Index - Africa Skating - Asia Skating - Europe Skating - Oceania Skating - Pan America Skating - Roller_Rinks - Friend the SkateLog Forum in Facebook - SkateLog Forum on Facebook

Forum Administrators: Jessica Wright and Kathie Fry | Email Us
Access code for buying and selling subforums: "skates"
How To Get a User Account and Posting Privileges in the SkateLog Forum
Use Google to Search the SkateLog Forum

Go Back   SkateLog Forum > Special Interest Skating Forums (sorted by number of posts) > Speed Skating Forum
FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Speed Skating Forum Most of the discussions in this forum will be about inline speed skating but discussions about ice speed skating and quad roller speed skating are also welcome.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old April 27th, 2011, 01:51 PM   #1
sommemi
Evn my Redbloodcells roll
 
sommemi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: N.E.Ohio
Posts: 914
Default "Proper" way to fall... ?

This seems like a really popular topic among derby skaters, but what about in speed where we don't wear stiff knee pads? I mean, I do see some people wearing knee pads, but not often since it binds at the back of the knee when you bend so far down. We seem to have at least one fall per practice at our rink, and even though we are a smaller team (and a quad only team as well), it still happens. Even at those times when we just do something stupid and fall all by ourselves lol.

So other than over simplifying by saying "tuck and roll, then get your @$$ back up and finish the race"... does anyone teach/practice 'proper' falling techniques? I've noticed a few people at our practice get fingers run over until I tell them to keep their dang hands pulled in if they fall.

I know there is this video for falling safely in gymnastics (which we were lectured about repeatedly when I was younger in gymnastics). But it seems silly that I haven't seen anyone address the 'proper fall' in skating yet? Or, at least SPEED skating... other than the occasional hilarious video of watching someone fall, but that's usually for entertainment, not training purposes.
sommemi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 27th, 2011, 02:13 PM   #2
Skatervideoguy
Senior Member
 
Skatervideoguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Olathe, Ks
Posts: 957
Default

Hi sommemi,

It occurs to me that even if there is some Best or Proper way to fall - no matter what type of Skating you're doing - there is no way to make it completely Safe. Not to mention, in Speed Skating, the other folks falling either into or onto you - and visa-versa. At least that was my experience.

You can certainly reduce your risk by learning to "Fall" better, but proper Protective Padding will still be your best bet. I use the "Volley Ball" style Knee Pads with great success. I do full Sit-Spins and I don't find them binding or restrictive.

Todays Padding options are much better than what I used back in the 60's for Speed Skating. You can surely find some Padding that will offer protection and minimal binding or restriction.

No matter how well you think you can control a fall - after almost 60 yrs of falling on skates, I'll tell you - you will not control them all - at least if your Skating.

Wear the best, and best fitting, Skate Protective Padding you can. Your body will love you for it, especially when you get older - and that's absolutely my experience.

Harold
__________________
297's on Centurys, 220's on Snyder Advantage, BackSpin 95's, Bones 97's, 98's, 101A's, Skating 65+yrs & still Rollin at 71+. Great Lifetime Hobby to have !
Skatervideoguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 27th, 2011, 02:35 PM   #3
sommemi
Evn my Redbloodcells roll
 
sommemi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: N.E.Ohio
Posts: 914
Default

Harold, I agree completely. Nothing beats good old padding and avoiding falling completely. And I would never claim that there is a completely SAFE way to fall... just maybe a 'better' way to fall than flailing out uncontrolled. I was taught from a young age that you NEVER throw your arms out in front of you when you fall or you will guarantee yourself a broken finger, wrist or even collarbone (from the shock going all the way up through a locked arm). Not to mention, if you fall and you have a hand out there and there are skaters right behind you, they only have a millisecond to swerve around you and that outstretched arm has a good chance of getting run over (or at the very least tripping the next person).
__________________
WWW.PORTAGESKATES.INFO - events, info, and more!
"SKATE the WORLD" project is growing!! http://www.portageskates.info/maps-and-trails
sommemi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 27th, 2011, 05:31 PM   #4
bjvircks
Major Trouble
 
bjvircks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Iowa
Posts: 1,726
Default

I believe the best thing to do for coming away from falls with the best results is to fall a lot! This means doing cross training and building your durability, flexiblity, proprioception (the ability of your body to react instantly on its own without you having to figure things out). Tumbling, horsing around in a safe setting, martial arts workouts are helpful. Another thing to do is to get experienced at knowing when it is best to slide, roll, or just take a hit. If you need to slide.... don't wear things that are grabby.

I know that there are some people who can get hurt just getting out of bed. I'm not sure if those people can be helped... but in general, people can develop the abilities to better cope with the unexpected.

A "Learn To Fall Safely" course sounds like a great opportunity for somebody to follow thru with!
__________________
Quando omni flunkus, moritati
bjvircks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 27th, 2011, 08:31 PM   #5
cass38a
Senior Member
 
cass38a's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Newcastle NSW, Australia
Posts: 3,653
Default

The best way to fall is at high speed on ashfelt wearing nothing but lycra. Once you are well skilled in this fall indoor falls are almost considered fun
cass38a is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 27th, 2011, 10:06 PM   #6
theDonnybrook
Just trying to keep up
 
theDonnybrook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Schaumburg, Illinois
Posts: 2,008
Default

I agree that it seems to be a matter of learning to fall safely mixed with wearing the right equipment. I recently was reminded about how important a helmet is, and oddly, was in the process of rolling out of that fall when the coat I was wearing grabbed the ground and pulled me hard resulting in my head hitting the pavement. I have also recently taken a dive and rolled without any problems. I used to be a gymnast and I am reasonably able to roll out of most falls, but some things you just never see coming.

I did find a short video on Youtube for beginner skaters about how to fall, but it requires you have knee pads.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HbGAit5Ora8

I think if you are using a pair of palm slider gloves, the same concepts could apply, so you would end up in a pushup position sliding on the front wheels of your skates and the plastic palms of the palm sliders. The problem is you would need the awareness of mind to get into the right position as you fall. maybe this just means you have to practice, but who wants to practice falling?
__________________
2012 Bont Z, 3PF 7050, ILQ9 Pro, Matter G13 110mm F1
inlinepaceline.wordpress.com
theDonnybrook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 28th, 2011, 12:11 AM   #7
topcarbon
Senior Member
 
topcarbon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Arizona, Mexico
Posts: 936
Default

there is no best way outdoors. Just don't do it.
__________________
[IMG]http://i30.photobucket.com/albums/c308/topcarbon/sig_topcopy.png[/IMG]
topcarbon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 28th, 2011, 01:17 AM   #8
ncspeed
trouble maker :)
 
ncspeed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Hickory NC
Posts: 893
Default

And indoors with a floor with freshly coated floor there is no proper way of falling. You are going to come away with skin missing and possibly some torn spandex. Best way to practice to fall is to practice proper form. Cause most of the time the ones that fall are the ones that sit to far forward or even backwards, or reach for the floor when diving into the turn "which I am guilty for doing that times". But there are times where your wheels just give out under the speed and and load or another skater just falls down in front of you and you no wear to go but over them one way or another either super man or jump over them and pray you land on both skates.
__________________
john boy

"anonymous said Sorry, but my outfit would not look right with neon green wheels. "
ncspeed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 28th, 2011, 01:40 AM   #9
slowsk8
Senior Member
 
slowsk8's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Tukwila, just south of Seattle
Posts: 1,940
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cass38a View Post
The best way to fall is at high speed on ashfelt wearing nothing but lycra. Once you are well skilled in this fall indoor falls are almost considered fun
Why the Lycra?
slowsk8 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 28th, 2011, 03:29 AM   #10
journeyman
Member
 
journeyman's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Milw,Wis.
Posts: 88
Default How not to fall!

Do some practice on those tricky situations leading up to where you might lose it and go down. So when you are surprised or trapped, your feet automatically have the skills. Work on stepping over the curbs, so when you get cut off you can handle a curb easily. Practice rolling off the trail on the grass. If it isn't too muddy or soft, you can easily put one skate forward and shift your weight off the front wheels. You can put 8 wheels on grass comfortably even at speed. Your safety position is one skate slightly forward. This puts you in a stable forward position when you get into trouble, like hitting a stick or gravel. Go downhill in this slight telemark position. Practice jumping over something. Either a step jump or a full jump. Again for stability, land on a slight telemark position.
So, work on your all around skills, then when that emergency situation happens, you can easily handle it. Heighten up your skating awareness. See, smell, and hear everything around you. Also give a friendly wave to that car or biker when you cut them off. They may spare you next time around.

My eyes need to start craving speed again
journeyman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 28th, 2011, 05:47 AM   #11
cass38a
Senior Member
 
cass38a's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Newcastle NSW, Australia
Posts: 3,653
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by slowsk8 View Post
Why the Lycra?
Why not?
cass38a is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 28th, 2011, 06:09 AM   #12
rufusprime99
Ninja Naked Mole Rat
 
rufusprime99's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: San Antonio Tx
Posts: 6,221
Default

Ahhh. You should have been around last year for THAT discussion.

Google Eddy Matzger fallsafe

OR

Fallsafe

(CITY SPORTS Magazine - May 1996}
by Eddy Matzger

You're on your skates. Mmmm. Gliding onto an Indy-car racetrack. Ahhah.
Powering up a 350 foot mountain at heart-stopping grades. Oww.
Casting yourself down the other side at speeds which pull back the fleshon your face. Yee-haw. Wincing as you hold your aerodynamic tuckthrough the corkscrew and hairpin turns. Ooooh. Drag racing down theflats until you're out of sight. Aaaah. Doing it all over again. Huh? Do itseven times to be exact. Uh-oh. Sounds like a recipe for road rash.

That's the scenario every spring at the Sea Otter Classic, a grueling raceheld on the Laguna Seca Motor Speedway in Monterey, CA. Rain orshine, the 2.7 mile loop is a highly technical mix of turns, straights, andhills. The thought alone of competing on such a demanding course isenough to strike fear into the hearts of even the most seasonedcompetitors. Some skating greats have taken one look at the course andgone home. Others have blown gaskets mid-race and had to pull off tothe pits.

The pre-race temblor of fear that wracks the body is inevitable. So arethe shaky legs which threaten to fail every time you crest the hill andtake the plunge down the backside. When oxygen debt asserts itself inevery lung and limb, severe instability can occur. In such a situation, atumble of epic proportions is just around the corner.

In 1992 someone sprawled headlong onto the pavement in thecorkscrew turn and shaved off a nipple. Amazingly enough, iteventually grew back. The racer rebuilt his confidence back up so thathe skates the Sea Otter again -- a major victory in and of itself-- but hecan still be seen T-stopping down the steepest sections of the course.
Mental scars don't grow back so easily.

This year another competitor couldn't hold the turn at the bottom of thecorkscrew and plowed through the dirt on the shoulder, ripping acrimson patch of flesh on his buttocks and hips. For another 45 minuteshe braved the course and finished without further mishap. After the racehe stoically conceded that he'll approach the downhill moreconservatively next time.

Falling may be inevitable, but the consequences need not be so adverse.
I've had plenty of high speed crashes, one of them into a GermanShepherd who thought he'd zipper out in the road like a squirrel, but I'venever even managed so much as to scrape myself up badly. The reason?

Page 1 of 3


Fallsafe

I needed a half a unit to graduate from college, so I took a gymnasticsclass. It taught me how to tumble.

I loved flip-flops and flips most, but dive rolls are what saved my skin.
at the end of class sometimes, we'd line people up face-down on themats, then get a running start and launch ourselves clear over the pile,
making sure not to clip the last person as we entered our last minutetuck into a forward roll. That forward roll prevented a sure face-plantevery time. It also helped dissipate the kinetic energy of our hurtlingbodies.

Similarly, if you fall on skates, by rolling to a stop you distribute theimpact more evenly over your whole body. Whereas you may get a fewminor nicks from rolling to rest, skidding abruptly to a stopunnecessarily abrades one primary patch of skin. That's why rolling to astop, while appearing much more dramatic than a simple scrub, isinfinitely preferable because the consequences are less dire.

The key to falling is to keep your head. By that I don't mean wear ahelmet, which is a given. I mean don't lose your head by freaking outand freezing like a deer in headlights. Stay relaxed and keep your cool.
That way, when making a crash landing, you'll remember those diverolls. Stiffening up in anticipation of impact only makes things worse.
Granted, it's okay for cartoon characters to skid to a stop, but we'rehuman and don't bounce back quite so fast.

SIDEBAR

By practicing some rolling maneuvers, you're programming your bodyto cope with the eventuality of a fall. Once you do fall and survive itwith a smile, you'll be much less apt to curtail your skating activities asa result. Mastering the art of falling is a tremendous confidence booster.
Here are a few tips on falling without breaking skin:

1. When falling on skates, pretend like you've just jumped off a
speeding train. Look at old movies to see how the stunt men did it. With
lots of practice it's possible to roll and come up skating, but rolling to a
stop is the goal of this exercise. Initiate your roll by tucking a shoulder,
then rotate sideways and keep going until after you've come to a stop.
By increasing your roll time, you decrease your potential for injury.
When you get up and brush the dust off of yourself, you'll feel like a
bandit who has just escaped with his life.
2. As you enter your roll, try thrusting your arms up over your head and
roll lengthwise like a hot dog. With fewer protuberances like wrists and
elbows sticking out, you run less risk of giving your bones bad bonks.
4/27/11 11:02 PM

Page 2 of 3


Fallsafe 4/27/11 11:02 PM

An alternative to this is to draw the arms into the chest while rolling,
but this leaves the face more exposed. By holding your arms up overyour head you shield your ears and create a little roll-cage for yourface.

3. Practice these rolls on a grassy surface first before taking your newtrick out onto the street. You can start tucking and rolling on the grasswithout skates, and later find a place where there's a nice transitionbetween pavement and turf so you can skate into your fall. Once you'vegot this down smoothly you're ready to graduate to some low speedtumbles on the hard stuff. Then with all the pads on just in case, you canbump it up to a higher speed. Please be careful since I don't make housecalls.
Eddy Matzger teaches these techniques and more at his highlyacclaimed weekend workshops made possible in part with productsupport from his generous sponsors, which include TWINCAM bearings,
Roces skates, PowerBar, Breathe Right, Specialized, and Transpack.
For more information on a workshop in your area, contact Bob Flynn at

(813) 443-3038.
Page 3 of 3

__________________
Don't let people live in your head rent free. ~princessfluffhead~ BontQRL/InvaderDA45: Seba-FRX: Alkali CA9
rufusprime99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 28th, 2011, 01:19 PM   #13
sommemi
Evn my Redbloodcells roll
 
sommemi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: N.E.Ohio
Posts: 914
Default

AWESOME responses guys!! Honestly, I think I'm pretty good at knowing how to fall (experience is a great teacher too! lol), but it really helps to hear other people share experience and descriptions to better know how to help others in this area too.

@Rufus - YES... I should have been here for THAT!!! lol Unfortunately, I just haven't been a member long enough to know where all the old conversations are. Thanks for posting that article! I really gotta give Eddy credit - he's a great teacher. He just knows how to explain things.
__________________
WWW.PORTAGESKATES.INFO - events, info, and more!
"SKATE the WORLD" project is growing!! http://www.portageskates.info/maps-and-trails
sommemi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 28th, 2011, 01:19 PM   #14
sommemi
Evn my Redbloodcells roll
 
sommemi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: N.E.Ohio
Posts: 914
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cass38a View Post
The best way to fall is at high speed on ashfelt wearing nothing but lycra. Once you are well skilled in this fall indoor falls are almost considered fun
+1
__________________
WWW.PORTAGESKATES.INFO - events, info, and more!
"SKATE the WORLD" project is growing!! http://www.portageskates.info/maps-and-trails
sommemi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 28th, 2011, 05:13 PM   #15
bjvircks
Major Trouble
 
bjvircks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Iowa
Posts: 1,726
Default

Yeah... it's always fun... until someone looses an eyelet!

My wife and I play at ice short track ( fitness, mostly. She's really longtrack. ... I'm off-road ) Kevlar gaiters for lower calves and kevlar collar for neck

What scares me the most is when, despite everyone's (seasoned skaters) best efforts, a youngster does something really unexpected and puts everyone in danger.
__________________
Quando omni flunkus, moritati
bjvircks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 28th, 2011, 10:50 PM   #16
LezSk8
Senior Member
 
LezSk8's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Longwood, Florida, 1 1/2 miles from the Seminole Wekiva Trail.
Posts: 935
Default

Tuck and roll (Eddy, above) is often all you really have time for in a skating fall. I've only seen one inline stater practice falling. In the assembly parking lot before a night street skate, the skater, with full pads and a helmet, got low, sissored, dropped to her right knee, went next to sliders and elbow pads, tucked her free skate & leg under her raised left hip, and while stll sliding at a lower speed, she bounced up using right knee, hands and elbows, and kept right on skating!

I was impressed and in awe, but have never had the guts to try practicing it. It looks worthwhile for situations where you have a pileup ahead of you and there is a few seconds to prepare.

Most of my fall give no time to prepare. My wheels pick up trail trash and I abrubtly slowdown or stop, and BAM! When possible, I get low, skate off the trail and tuck and roll. I may get dirty, but no road rash, no trashed $80 lycra and I get up and finish my skate, so ...

LezSk8!
__________________
LezSk8 Central Florida!
Visit http://www.cftb.us for local trail & activity information.
LezSk8 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 29th, 2011, 02:13 AM   #17
markthetrucker
Senior Member
 
markthetrucker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Secret Location If I told ya...I'd have to kill ya
Posts: 1,183
Default

The best way to fall outdoors is on Grass!!!
markthetrucker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 29th, 2011, 03:18 AM   #18
BWI-Sheldon
Pro Bike Chaser
 
BWI-Sheldon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Maryland
Posts: 3,378
Default

Fall preparation begins in the parking lot for me when I put on the pads and helmet.

That's usually the only time and prep that can be done.
BWI-Sheldon is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
falling

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 05:20 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.