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Speed Skating Forum Most of the discussions in this forum will be about inline speed skating but discussions about ice speed skating and quad roller speed skating are also welcome.

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Old October 25th, 2006, 07:57 PM   #21
janneman
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he he what's on a man's mind.. "boot" in dutch is boat - you know - thingy that floats in water you sit in .. huh? moulding a vessel? ahhh engrisch language.

"heat gun" also known as paint-stripper. yes. carefull, too hot actually.... as some know already.

code... since when do you have 2 pair of C4s?
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Old October 25th, 2006, 10:06 PM   #22
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janneman,

I got the second pair of C4's a couple of months ago. The idea was that I was going to have a pair set up for my daily and long distance skates with the 5x80. For the days I was going to only skate about six to eight miles but do so as fast as I could I set up another C4 boot with a 3x100 1x84. Well, I get out and at about the four mile mark I believe my muscles around my shin were going to just break, snap. My form was so horrible that I can't even talk about it. You would have cried if you saw me. The next day I get out and skate about two miles and the same thing. So I ordered a 5x84 frame and it is much better. I can at least skate ten miles before I need to stop. So it works out, I use my 5x84 set up twice a week when I go out and only skate six to eight miles but go as fast as I can. The other four days I use my much loved 5x80 set up. Now I every once in a few weeks put on the big wheeled frame but I can tell I am just not ready for it yet. I am now thinking of getting the new R2 with a 5x80 set up and really soft wheels and Powerside Rust proof bearings and put an ezfit rubber boot cover on them for skating on rainy days. By accident I went skating the other day in a nice rain and just loved it.
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Old October 25th, 2006, 11:53 PM   #23
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oferyko,

Online/Inline said to skate in the boots for a while before heat molding and in thinking about it I agree totally. By accident that is what I did and I am very pleased with my boots. I thought about it and I probably put on about four hundred miles before putting my boots in the oven. Those boots you have are to excellent to goof up so if it were me I would skate a lot of miles in them before doing any heat molding. Personally (and this is just me) but I don't have enough knowledge or skill or experience to feel confident to heat mold with a heat gun. The oven method has worked very well for me. But like I said my first pair of Powerslide C4 boots had about four hundred miles on them before heat molding them. My other pair of C4 boots that I am going to heat mold someday soon have probably about the same mileage on them. Skate a lot in them first you may find heat molding is not necessary. The only reason I am heat molding my boots is because I know for sure two areas that I can change a little to make my foot feel much much better. One is around the ankle and the other is the toe.
thanks code.
what do u think i should do with the upper most buckle? (not the two velcros, the upper one with the plastic and metal clip). if i'm not wrong the C4 also has comething similar to it, doesn't it?

and by the way, like u probably did, i'm also skating abit before molding the boot.
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Old October 26th, 2006, 02:15 AM   #24
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Someone told me that you should take off your boots before placing them in the oven.

Let me know if this is really necessary.
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Old October 26th, 2006, 03:32 AM   #25
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thanks code.
what do u think i should do with the upper most buckle? (not the two velcros, the upper one with the plastic and metal clip). if i'm not wrong the C4 also has comething similar to it, doesn't it?

and by the way, like u probably did, i'm also skating abit before molding the boot.
You only do up the laces.
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Old October 26th, 2006, 07:37 PM   #26
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oferyko,

I'm just repeating what mVirtue said and the reason I am repeating it is because it is very important. ONLY TIGHTEN YOUR SKATE BY LACING. If you use the straps or buckles they will stretch and not be any good.

Something else is that after you skate a lot in the boots you will see on your foot where the spots are that could use some more room in the boot for. That is why the doubling up of the Dr. Scholls pads worked great for me. It gives the boot just the right position and hopefully your boot doesn't need major adjustment and the Dr. Scholls pad method just molds the boot a little bit. Also I heat molded my boot twice. The first time I did it I just concentrated on my toes and ankle but I had a spot under my left arch that was blistering. So on the second time just to test I put a Dr. Scholls arch pad on and the other pads on and put the boot in the oven. I have done many fifty mile skates and have yet to get a blister on my arch. The way I tested to see if the boot was ready was with a cooking mit on I would take the boot and see how soft the bottom was, if it would move with some pressure I put the boot in the oven for five more minutes, got myself ready and then retrieved the boot and put it on. I then left the boot on for at least fifteen minutes if not twenty. During this time I also pushed in with my hands the heel because I have very skinny heels and I like the feel of a tight heel. The reason I said, get myself ready, is because I was told it is critical to leave your foot in beyond the time it takes for the boot to cool. Sitting there with one skate boot on careful not to put a lot of downward force on the boot feels like a very long time and this is a time to be very very patient. So I had some music going and reading material, took my bathroom break and was ready to just sit down. Now I didn't heat the boot with the frame on but I will do that when I heat mold my other pair of skate boots because it makes sense to me and I count myself lucky that the bolt positions didn't change on me. Whew!

Something I have learned which is kind of strange is that I have found that making small changes makes a big difference. Just the width of two Dr. Scholls pads is enough to make my foot not blister. Moving a frame over just a millimeter or two and I am able to hit the sweet spot on my wheels without trying. Since my skating technique is I am sure not precise in any way you look at it, it just amazes me that such a small change in the skate can make such a difference but it does.

Have fun and be patient.
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Old October 30th, 2006, 10:29 PM   #27
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Oferyko,

Just to add to the confusion. I talked with a man named Rich who owns nettracing.com and is quite knowledgeable and I feel very honest. He only gives advice based on what he himself has tested many times over time. Not to say he knows everything and I don't think he would ever say he does but he has helped me a great deal.

Now I have oven heat molded one pair of my C4 boots and the two spots that were giving me trouble are now gone. The toes I figure I am just going to have to grind a little bit with my dremel tool. My other pair of C4's fit great in the toe but the guy I bought them from grinded just a tiny amount of the toes out. Anyway Rich told me never to oven mold a boot because it will destroy the support of the boot. Only spot mold with a heat gun. He said the boot should not be a mirror image of the foot. It is designed to be stiff in certain areas and loose in others for efficient skating. Well, I can't really tell but then I am not such a strong skater either. I will grind out the toes but will not be oven molding my other C4 and soon to be arriving the new R2, just because Rich knows and has so much more experience about skating and skates than I do.

I really don't know what is right. For me it seemed to help but the skate I oven heat molded I use for long slow distance skating, perhaps if I try to go really fast or sprint in the boot it will not work well. The other thing is that it could just be coincidence that my foot toughened up about the same time as I heat molded and it was more my foot getting tough and form improving than the mold of my boot. I can definitely see that because my feet on the bottom and sides are like leather. The only changes I am going to make in my boots are to dremel out the toes a little but then I don't have any real boot pain complaints. All my complaints are from doing interval training that I just started a day ago and I am hurting all over and I can barely walk.
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Old November 1st, 2006, 03:59 AM   #28
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Oferyko,

Just to add to the confusion. I talked with a man named Rich who owns nettracing.com and is quite knowledgeable and I feel very honest. He only gives advice based on what he himself has tested many times over time. Not to say he knows everything and I don't think he would ever say he does but he has helped me a great deal.

Now I have oven heat molded one pair of my C4 boots and the two spots that were giving me trouble are now gone. The toes I figure I am just going to have to grind a little bit with my dremel tool. My other pair of C4's fit great in the toe but the guy I bought them from grinded just a tiny amount of the toes out. Anyway Rich told me never to oven mold a boot because it will destroy the support of the boot. Only spot mold with a heat gun. He said the boot should not be a mirror image of the foot. It is designed to be stiff in certain areas and loose in others for efficient skating. Well, I can't really tell but then I am not such a strong skater either. I will grind out the toes but will not be oven molding my other C4 and soon to be arriving the new R2, just because Rich knows and has so much more experience about skating and skates than I do.

I really don't know what is right. For me it seemed to help but the skate I oven heat molded I use for long slow distance skating, perhaps if I try to go really fast or sprint in the boot it will not work well. The other thing is that it could just be coincidence that my foot toughened up about the same time as I heat molded and it was more my foot getting tough and form improving than the mold of my boot. I can definitely see that because my feet on the bottom and sides are like leather. The only changes I am going to make in my boots are to dremel out the toes a little but then I don't have any real boot pain complaints. All my complaints are from doing interval training that I just started a day ago and I am hurting all over and I can barely walk.

i'm abit confused over what he said. What is the point of customs then?
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Old November 1st, 2006, 05:42 AM   #29
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hi guys,
thanks. totaly agree about not inserting the boot to an oven, just the though of it makes me worry.
but still i have some questions:
1. A "heat gun" what is it? like hair drier?
2. maybe heating the interior of the boot? looks good?
3. i understand why not the wheels, but what about the frame? keep it attached or seperate it from the boot?
4. about the tounge story, what went wrong with the tounge?
A heat gun can be purchased at an arts and crafts store.....at least here in the states. I use one to dry my artwork quicker.
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Old November 1st, 2006, 03:18 PM   #30
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Ophidias,

I know exactly what you mean. I heat molded my boots which are Powerslide C4's by Powerslides instructions. Except that I put some Dr. Scholls pads on the areas that were hurting on my foot then put a sock over them and then put my foot in the hot boot. Personally I love the way the boots feel and I have skated fifty miles in them at one time and have no problems but then my feet now are getting very tough. I don't know if customs are mirror images of your foot. The way Rich explained it was the boot is designed with the idea of supporting your foot for the stresses of skating. It is supposed to be tight and hard in areas by design and roomy in areas by design. Now I pay close attention to what Rich says, don't always follow it but I do listen carefully because he has a great deal of experience and has proven to me many times to be a very honest and trustworthy man. He has had many opportunities to capitalize on my ignorance but instead has always told me of a much less costly alternative which actually worked out for the better. He has spent a great deal of time on the phone with me walking me through adjusting my frame and that has I believe improved my skating so much I truly appreciate his efforts and knowledge.

I have two Powerslide C4 boots with different frames and wheel/bearing setups. One I oven heat molded and the other I didn't and I really can't tell the difference between the two so I tend to believe what Rich said that the way boots are made today heat molding is most often not necessary.

I think more attention should be placed on foot care and skating technique. While I was trying to break the fifty mile mark (which was extremely difficult for me) I was having various foot problems all the time. Then I started paying more attention to my feet like massaging them, soaking them in a brine/tea solution and periodically during the day I would roll them over a wooden foot massager. I also dry my boots out after skating and powder them with an antifungal powder. On my over twenty mile skates in the summer which in Texas is very hot I stop when my feet are soaked with sweat and wipe out my boots and put on clean dry socks and continue skating. Also massage your achilles tendon before and after skating and periodically throughout the day. At least this has helped me.
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Old November 2nd, 2006, 12:03 PM   #31
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Ophidias,

I know exactly what you mean. I heat molded my boots which are Powerslide C4's by Powerslides instructions. Except that I put some Dr. Scholls pads on the areas that were hurting on my foot then put a sock over them and then put my foot in the hot boot. Personally I love the way the boots feel and I have skated fifty miles in them at one time and have no problems but then my feet now are getting very tough. I don't know if customs are mirror images of your foot. The way Rich explained it was the boot is designed with the idea of supporting your foot for the stresses of skating. It is supposed to be tight and hard in areas by design and roomy in areas by design. Now I pay close attention to what Rich says, don't always follow it but I do listen carefully because he has a great deal of experience and has proven to me many times to be a very honest and trustworthy man. He has had many opportunities to capitalize on my ignorance but instead has always told me of a much less costly alternative which actually worked out for the better. He has spent a great deal of time on the phone with me walking me through adjusting my frame and that has I believe improved my skating so much I truly appreciate his efforts and knowledge.

I have two Powerslide C4 boots with different frames and wheel/bearing setups. One I oven heat molded and the other I didn't and I really can't tell the difference between the two so I tend to believe what Rich said that the way boots are made today heat molding is most often not necessary.

I think more attention should be placed on foot care and skating technique. While I was trying to break the fifty mile mark (which was extremely difficult for me) I was having various foot problems all the time. Then I started paying more attention to my feet like massaging them, soaking them in a brine/tea solution and periodically during the day I would roll them over a wooden foot massager. I also dry my boots out after skating and powder them with an antifungal powder. On my over twenty mile skates in the summer which in Texas is very hot I stop when my feet are soaked with sweat and wipe out my boots and put on clean dry socks and continue skating. Also massage your achilles tendon before and after skating and periodically throughout the day. At least this has helped me.
wow this proved to be very serious matter, and personaly to me very complicated one. since i don't have any warts right now, i think i'll leave the boots just the way the are.
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Old November 2nd, 2006, 03:10 PM   #32
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That is very smart Oferyko. You have some awesome skates there. Something that I found very helpful in aligning my frames which can also be a very time consuming and complicated process, is to order what are called, "supergrips" frame locking system. Check out adamsinline.com and look under hardware. The thing is that they allowed me to loosen the bolts just a little but still have some grip on the frame so I could make millimeter adjustments to my frame. Then I would go skate five or so miles and maybe make another adjustment or skate a few times and then make another adjustment. They hold your frame on very securely and will not rust. Once you make your adjustment even just maybe a millimeter it will stay there. It took me probably a total of two weeks, skating everyday, of going back and forth but now I have my frames adjusted to where I have maximum skate control and hit the wheel sweet spot easily. For me it made all the difference in being able to do a successful double push. I have three skates with three different wheels, frames, bearings and all have these Supergrips on them.

Enjoy your skating and send pictures of where you skate.
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Old November 3rd, 2006, 11:47 AM   #33
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10x code.
findind the right "sweet spot" (as u named it) look for me like finding the G spot. there is a new configuration for each model and it always takes alot of patience and time...
but sireously, since i'm not an expert and i don't have any inside/outside collapse of the foot, i attached the frame in the middle of the boot and left it as it is.
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Old November 9th, 2006, 12:49 AM   #34
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Wink moulding my boots

if your boots are leather...take a pair of thick socks, soak them in hot hot water, squeeze out most of the water so the socks are still hot, wear them to skate in for at least one hour, possibly two if you can. Leather stretches when wet, if you do this the leather will mold around your feet but only if you use hot hot water.
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Old November 9th, 2006, 07:35 AM   #35
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if your boots are leather...take a pair of thick socks, soak them in hot hot water, squeeze out most of the water so the socks are still hot, wear them to skate in for at least one hour, possibly two if you can. Leather stretches when wet, if you do this the leather will mold around your feet but only if you use hot hot water.
before you do this you might want to do a search for the discussion on blisters. Good luck.
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Old November 9th, 2006, 05:32 PM   #36
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Talking Heat Molded

Hi , yes heat molding can be a burden if not done correctly, myself i like a heat gun over the oven but first skate on them around your driveway or street and make some notes on where you need room and where you need to take up some slack. Then go inside take the heat gun stay about 3-4 inches from the boot inside and out, heat the areas where you made the notes on,Remember one skate at a time,then when the areas get a little soft not to much, put them on and lace them snug ,stand up move around a little and flex your ankles back and fourth and repeat this entire step again and that should do it. Just remember if you get the boots to hot you will damage the mould and never get it to fit right. sammysk82

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Old November 9th, 2006, 09:47 PM   #37
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good advice there, Sammy and others. Interesting how you hear different theories on heat molding. Some like NettRacing and Swatskate prefer heat gun, others like the oven method. I was surprised to hear Simmons Racing say that heat gun should only be used by those evperienced in the process, and they recommend oven method.

Please note that most sources that explain heat gun method recommend keeping the gun moving and atleast 4 inches or more away from the boot. I've seen areas of a boot burned, and it can happen quite quickly. Here;s the link to swatskates explanation at the process:
http://www.swatskates.com/technica.htm#HEATMOLD
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