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Beginning Skaters Forum This is the place for beginning skaters to ask questions and share their stories. We would love to hear about your experiences learning to skate. No question is too dumb!

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Old November 26th, 2011, 02:11 AM   #1
afreed
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Default Another Newbie "What Quads Should I Buy" Thread

Hi! I know there are a ton of threads on this subject already, but I'd still love to test everyone's patience and get some personalized advice.

I've been skating for about six months now, at an indoor rink, on quad rentals. I'm no good--I'm only just now getting the hang of front-to-back transitions and clockwise crossovers, and I'm distantly aiming at getting a proper tomahawk stop down--but I love it. I'm happy to invest serious money in my own skates, yet end up paralyzed looking at all the options.

I'm looking for a pair that will take me through the basics and grow with me for a while--I'm not anticipating getting into serious jam / speed / artistic skating any time soon, but I'd like to try as much as possible.

My dilemmas:

1) High top or low cut? Most of the rentals I've tried are high tops, and I like the ankle support, but am I limiting myself too much on speed and flexibility? Will it be disastrous if I try to switch from one style to another? Is there a happy median?

2) What price range? I look at $200 skates and I'm not sure what makes them so different from $600 skates. As I said, I'm willing to invest the money, but I don't want junk and (conversely) I don't want skates so far beyond my skill level it only gets me in trouble.

3) Leather or non-leather? I'm a vegetarian, and if I'm going to buy a new pair of skates, I'd like to buy non-leather. I know Riedell will custom-make skates from clarino, so that's what I lean toward (though I'd willingly buy used leather skates, if I could find the right ones), but maybe there are other options.

4) Where to buy? Favorite websites for this sort of thing?

Any advice whatsoever is appreciated. Specific skate recommendations would be awesome. Help me finally commit!
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Old November 26th, 2011, 04:50 AM   #2
40yearslater
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I've not skated in low-cut boots, so I can't say much about them, other than the fact that people on the forum really like the Rebel Invader da 45 as an affordable low-cut skate. Lots of buzz about the Sure-Grip Avenger plate, too, but I haven't read any reviews yet. Check the derby forum and Doc Sk8's forum.

I started out about three (?) years ago with Riedell 120 boots, Sure-Grip Super X plates and Roller Bones wheels.
I subsequently got some 297 boots and Snyder Advantage plates, which are generally very highly regarded, and they are in fact lighter, quicker and have more precise response.
But I sometimes still use the first set-up, and am always surprised by how much I enjoy them. A bit heavy, not as quick by any means, but a pretty fun ride. I think the 120 is a really good boot for the price, nice support, but at the same time, comfortable right from the start. I'd go with a Sure-Grip Classic (precision pivot pin) or Century plate, though.
You'd definitely get a good start with those. A lot of people would probably disagree, but I think that as far as skate prices go, it's something like audiophile equipment. You can end up paying a lot more, but after a certain point, there's a bit of diminishing return - you get less incremental gain in performance for how much money you pay. It's what you put into it as far as skating that matters: the main thing is to get a good enough pair that will give you something to really work with. Something like that would give a good two years of getting better, and then you could decide if you wanted an upgrade, and more likely to know in which area of skating you might want to concentrate and base it on that.

Connies's will do packages of your choice:
http://www.create-a-skate.com/ri120cr.html

Last edited by 40yearslater; November 26th, 2011 at 11:23 PM.
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Old November 28th, 2011, 05:24 AM   #3
funkysk8r
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+1 on the riedell 120 boot.
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Old December 5th, 2011, 07:13 PM   #4
DonnaTheDead6
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I've been skating derby for about a year and a half, and that whole time I've been on R3s. They're a great for beginner-intermediate skating, and you can change pretty much any part out for something better as you continue skating and getting to know what you want. The downside is that they are leather, but I'm sure you could find used ones in good condition. Another thing is that the wheels that come with them aren't the best, and they wear down pretty quick. I can't really say anything about other skates, because my R3s are really the only skates I've skated with other than rink rental skates.
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Old December 6th, 2011, 03:36 AM   #5
MANY_SkatingDave
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Default Something from Rufus on Low Tops

Hi

Rufus did great in the following tread, so I will repost the link.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Booper Scooper View Post
Hello,

Im posting so I can get all your great and insightful advice on skate choice for my lucky self. o -o
Now I skate with great fast skaters in Art boots as well so I don't disagree with an Art boot.

Yours in Skating, MA/NY Skating Dave
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Old December 8th, 2011, 01:26 AM   #6
rufusprime99
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Quote:
Originally Posted by afreed View Post
Hi! I know there are a ton of threads on this subject already, but I'd still love to test everyone's patience and get some personalized advice.

I've been skating for about six months now, at an indoor rink, on quad rentals. I'm no good--I'm only just now getting the hang of front-to-back transitions and clockwise crossovers, and I'm distantly aiming at getting a proper tomahawk stop down--but I love it. I'm happy to invest serious money in my own skates, yet end up paralyzed looking at all the options.

I'm looking for a pair that will take me through the basics and grow with me for a while--I'm not anticipating getting into serious jam / speed / artistic skating any time soon, but I'd like to try as much as possible.

My dilemmas:

1) High top or low cut? Most of the rentals I've tried are high tops, and I like the ankle support, but am I limiting myself too much on speed and flexibility? Will it be disastrous if I try to switch from one style to another? Is there a happy median?

For general skating, ie, a little bit of everything, you could go either way. Somewhat more important than the boot height is the heel height. (you can always not lace a higher boot all the way) A low/no heel boot gets your center of gravity lower, gives you a more connected feel to the plate. A more sporty responsive feel generally. A high heel takes some of that sportiness away and changes the weight balance to your forefoot. This makes things like toe pivoting easier. It MAY cause foot discomfort a bit more easily than a low/no heel boot as your weight is distributed more evenly on a low/no heel. A good no/low heel will also be lighter.

2) What price range? I look at $200 skates and I'm not sure what makes them so different from $600 skates. As I said, I'm willing to invest the money, but I don't want junk and (conversely) I don't want skates so far beyond my skill level it only gets me in trouble.

Price can be very dependent on intended use. A good speed skate needs expensive bearings and wheels. Also a light plate and strong (leather) comfortable boot. A workable JB skate, the dance type of skating where a person skates in roughly a 4x4 square doing stepping and pivoting, can cost MUCH less.

3) Leather or non-leather? I'm a vegetarian, and if I'm going to buy a new pair of skates, I'd like to buy non-leather. I know Riedell will custom-make skates from clarino, so that's what I lean toward (though I'd willingly buy used leather skates, if I could find the right ones), but maybe there are other options.

Leather makes for the best boot, usually by far. You can get a synthetic, but they will most likely tear, stretch, and not breathe. If you are open to making an exception in using a leather product, you boot is a good place. (I answered this question first. By far the easiest of your questions to answer )

4) Where to buy? Favorite websites for this sort of thing?

Any advice whatsoever is appreciated. Specific skate recommendations would be awesome. Help me finally commit!
Plate sizing and a good mount are VERY important. I pretty much advise getting your skate built by a skatelogger. We have some tricks, plus good proper mounting that you may or may not get elsewhere.

So let's start with a particular skate and examine its' characteristics. The SG Rebel Invader. It comes with a leather low cut low heel boot. The leather is hard in most places and is more of a shell of a boot than a boot that hugs your foot. It has thick padding that fills the gap. It comes with Fugitive wheels that come in a wide speed wheel or a mid width wheel that may be a better general skating wheel. Good quality bearings. The plate is noteworthy. It is an Invader DA45. The DA45 part of it stands for Double Action, 45 degree. A 45 degree plate has a greater/tighter turning ability than the average 10 degree plate, which is most likely what you have been skating. It also has some features of a higher priced plate, namely a delrin pivot cup and an adjustable pivot pin, for precise action. I skate 2 DA45's and I love the precise feel and action of the plate. This skate hovers around the $200 mark, though it performs well above its' price point, and is therefore a very good value. A few caveats: The boot only comes in full sizes and works better on a regular to wide foot, and the tongue will take several skating sessions to break in.

So, taking this as a starting point, what are likes/dislikes or questions about this skate? Or if you have been looking at a skate, tell us what it is so we can comment on it.
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