S k a t e L o g     F o r u m
Inline Skating and Quad Roller Skating
Forum Hosts: Jessica Wright | Kathie Fry

FOLLOW US: Our Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Email    


Home - Forum Index - Africa Skating - Asia Skating - Europe Skating - Oceania Skating - Pan America Skating - Roller_Rinks - Friend the SkateLog Forum in Facebook - SkateLog Forum on Facebook

Forum Administrators: Jessica Wright and Kathie Fry | Email Us
Access code for buying and selling subforums: "skates"
How To Get a User Account and Posting Privileges in the SkateLog Forum
Use Google to Search the SkateLog Forum

Go Back   SkateLog Forum > Special Interest Skating Forums (sorted by number of posts) > Quad Roller Skating Forum
FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Quad Roller Skating Forum Discussions about quad roller skates and any other quad skating discussions that do not seem appropriate for one of our other forums.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old January 28th, 2018, 07:42 AM   #1
netplaceus
David
 
netplaceus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: La Mesa, CA
Posts: 145
Default Roll Line Dance Plate on a size 11 Riedell 297 boot - Can it be done?

Here the deal. I have Riedell 297 boot would like the Roll Line Dance Plate, but for some reason the chart says I need a 190 plate for the Riedell size 11 boot.

All the other boot manufacturers on the same size chart say a 180 is needed.
(it's the standard ATLAS Skates US chart)

So I am confused, it seems like the correct Axel Spread would not be different from boot to boot, right?

This is an issue to me because I have a Riedell 297 boot size 11, and according to the chart I would need a 190 and they don't make a 190 for the Roll Line Dance Plate (180 max). So I would have to buy a different boot or plate.

I mean it is a shorter plate, seems like there would be more room for adjustment right?

I'm guessing it is because the bolts don't line up somehow or the heal is larger or smaller or something. What do you guys think?
__________________
Boots: Riedell 297, Plate: R-L Energy, Wheels: R-L Panther Light 55MM 95A, Me: 165 lb, 6'2"
netplaceus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 28th, 2018, 02:20 PM   #2
ursle
Street Skater
 
ursle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: NH
Posts: 2,811
Default

As this is the open forum not the figures forum, are you mounting for dance and figures or general skating?
If for competition, there is a guideline, as you know from the atlas chart, it's a guideline.
Sort of like the pirates creed, just a guideline

But if you're mounting for free skating and session skating, it's your choice, shorter plates turn in a smaller radius than longer plates.

If that plate is Roll-lines longest plate and it's a dance plate, I bet lots of European dance competitors use the longest plate available and if their boot is larger place the front axle where they prefer and let the rear axle fall where it may.
ursle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 29th, 2018, 12:38 AM   #3
netplaceus
David
 
netplaceus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: La Mesa, CA
Posts: 145
Default

Free skating and session skating. The plate is supposed be great for bobbing and weaving, spinning and OK for almost everything else except jumping.

Which just about describes crowded adult night rink sessions, no room to really jump if you wanted to.

"Place the front axle where they prefer and let the rear axle fall where it may."

Thanks, that's what I thought the case would likely be.

Still, I wonder just what is different about the Riedell boots that made them an exception on the chart? If I knew why, I think I would feel more comfortable making the investment and or that it was not a bad idea.

I am afraid if I order the plate, lay it on the boot, I will understand why it was an exception So I'm hoping somebody already knows and or put one on a Riedell boot with experience.
__________________
Boots: Riedell 297, Plate: R-L Energy, Wheels: R-L Panther Light 55MM 95A, Me: 165 lb, 6'2"
netplaceus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 29th, 2018, 02:18 AM   #4
larryoracing
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Lomita, Ca, work in El Segundo, CA
Posts: 960
Smile My two cents for whatever it's worth.

I have never mounted a Reidell Boot on a Roll Line plate, but a couple of girls have.

A 297 boot on Roll Line Dance Plate and Riedell 336 boot on a Roll Line Dance plate. Oh yeah and another boy just bought a 297 boot and mounted it on a Roll Line Energy Plate and yet another person who I think mounted a Riedell boot on Energy Roll Line plate.

My question is why do people buy plates that they should not be buying. A Roll Line Dance Plate was designed to cut deep edges doing Artistic Dance. competition

If you are not doing this there is no reason to buy this plate. I have recommended people not to buy the Dance Roll Line plate and they are really happy with the decision.


Next the two girls who bought Roll Line Dance Plates measured the Axel distance of the plates they are skating on now. Then they bought new Roll Line Dance plates with that exact same axel distance dimension. The axel distance you are skating on determines the plate you buy and then buy the Boot and just mount it on it.


One person went against this rule and bought the plate axel dimension recommended by Riedell. Big mistake had to buy a new set Roll Line energy plates with the exact axel distance he was skating on now. Stick with the axel distance you are skating now unless you feel you need a longer plate or shorter!

Have a great day! And Good luck. For the money you will pay for these plates, boots, etc, you better know what you are doing or have tons of cash to buy the right equipment.

Sincerely,

Larry O.


I run a Roll Line Dance plate on a Berry Boot. Very Trick set up. It's a short mount and similar to a Custom Riedell Boot mounted on a short Synder Imperial skate, but a Standard Reidell Boot I'm running a Longer Synder plate. The Shorter plate, boot is much more Reactive. I only use these skates for Artistic Dance Competition.

I don't use the standard 275 Donald Jackson boot on the size 9 Synder Imperial Plate. Not reactive enough for Weave Dance Competion. Very Few People need this plate. It's design to cut some deep edges on Advanced Artistic Dances. Very few people do this type of completion. Stick with the Energy Plate on your exiting Reidell boot, but get a new plate with the exact axel length dimension you are now running.
larryoracing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 29th, 2018, 03:09 AM   #5
amohrfeld
Senior Member
 
amohrfeld's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Houston Texas
Posts: 310
Default

First, The charts are really just a starting point. However, The Roll Line chart is fairly accurate. It is more important to determine the position of the ball of the foot and your heel center. Larger plates allow more room for error. Shorter plates must be mounted exactly. The rear wheel should be under the heel center. I disagree that you should focus on the front axle and let the rear fall where it may. You "feel" the front position more but the rear position limits movement or knocks you on your butt if not correct.

I'm using a 170 on a 9.5 boot for both my art skates - dance and freestyle. This is below the recommended length.

My Dance/336 plate is mounted fairly far back. It forces posture, but is brutal when leaning forward. I'm getting used to it though. I just built a Energy/Edea freestyle skate because the Dance/336 is limited to Dance and session skating. No stability to do a jump. I moved the plate forward .090" to get up on the rear wheels easier. Maybe I moved it too much. Time will tell.
amohrfeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 29th, 2018, 03:13 AM   #6
amohrfeld
Senior Member
 
amohrfeld's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Houston Texas
Posts: 310
Default

My method for determining position of ball and heel:

Put a tiny bit of oil on a pin or fine pencil point. Touch it to the ball of the foot and the heel center. Place your foot on a piece of paper and trace your foot. Do this on 3-4 sheets to make sure you find the correct points. Draw center line and perpendicular lines to the grease points. Measure the distance along the center line. This measurement is the shortest plate you can use.

Now the real challenge starts. You must translate these two points to the bottom of the skate boot and line up the axles. And then hope all your measurements were correct.
amohrfeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 29th, 2018, 05:04 AM   #7
Mort
Sk8 Ninja
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Huntington Wv
Posts: 3,303
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by amohrfeld View Post
First, The charts are really just a starting point. However, The Roll Line chart is fairly accurate. It is more important to determine the position of the ball of the foot and your heel center. Larger plates allow more room for error. Shorter plates must be mounted exactly. The rear wheel should be under the heel center. I disagree that you should focus on the front axle and let the rear fall where it may. You "feel" the front position more but the rear position limits movement or knocks you on your butt if not correct.

I'm using a 170 on a 9.5 boot for both my art skates - dance and freestyle. This is below the recommended length.

My Dance/336 plate is mounted fairly far back. It forces posture, but is brutal when leaning forward. I'm getting used to it though. I just built a Energy/Edea freestyle skate because the Dance/336 is limited to Dance and session skating. No stability to do a jump. I moved the plate forward .090" to get up on the rear wheels easier. Maybe I moved it too much. Time will tell.

You missed something Ursle said.

Quote:
If that plate is Roll-lines longest plate and it's a dance plate, I bet lots of European dance competitors use the longest plate available and if their boot is larger place the front axle where they prefer and let the rear axle fall where it may.
Meaning since there was not a plate of their actual desired length, they just buy the largest, place it where they want in the front, where it matters most, and they deal with the rear being a bit shorter tham optimal for their desired setup.

I don't think there are many out there wishing to buy a pate over the max size that roll*line makes though. Thats a damn big foot , ya know, speaking of art mounts that is.
__________________
Home rink: Roll-A-Rama in Huntington Wv.
"Focus on form and speed is a byproduct, focus on speed and falling is a byproduct." - Matguy
Mort is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 29th, 2018, 05:28 AM   #8
dvw
Secretary of Skate
 
dvw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Hendersonville, TN
Posts: 4,383
Default Can it be done?

Sure. I skate a 180 on a size 13. 180 on an 11 is a walk in the park.

Of course, I don't know what kind of skating you intend to do. That changes the answer.

"The chart" as it relates to the high end art plates like Snyder, Atlas, Roll Line, etc, is intended as a guide on sizing for traditional art disciplines. If that's what you're doing, chances are that's the neighborhood you should be in. Your coach should be able to steer you.

If you're skating for fun, all bets are off. Plate sizing and position is a very individual thing. I skate short forward, arguably shorter than most. It works for me and I like it. 180mm is actually the upper limit. Anything longer and the skate feels like a cinder block.

But to your original question, no, you likely should not be changing sizes between plate types without some compelling reason to do so.
__________________
Find some roller derby girls. Don't try to romance them! That don't end well. okie 10/12/2011
Royals FTW! When only the shiny will do... Doc Sk8 05/19/2012
dvw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 29th, 2018, 06:00 AM   #9
netplaceus
David
 
netplaceus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: La Mesa, CA
Posts: 145
Post

You know what? I think I will be sticking with my Mistral plate

I will just have to remain jealous of all those people with smaller more agile feet. At least I am a size 11 and not a 15 or something.

The Dance plate sounds interesting from what I have read, although I don't know if it's application is as wide as Roll Line says. But that was not really the question.

It's a complicated question that kind of got lost. I always thought the ideal plate size was determined by your foot size and or measurements of your ball, heel distances. We all agree on that, right?

However, according to the Roll Line chart it is not. If you have a Riedell size 11 boot you will need a 190 plate, but most other boot manufacturers say 180 for the same size foot?

In other words for size 11 why do you need a 190 with Riedell and a 180 with nearly all the other boot manufacturers for a Roll Line plate? What does the boot manufacturer have to do with what size plate will work best under your foot?

I think it is a good question, you want the best fit. So is it 180 or 190? What does it have to do with the boot?
__________________
Boots: Riedell 297, Plate: R-L Energy, Wheels: R-L Panther Light 55MM 95A, Me: 165 lb, 6'2"
netplaceus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 29th, 2018, 06:19 AM   #10
netplaceus
David
 
netplaceus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: La Mesa, CA
Posts: 145
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dvw View Post
180mm is actually the upper limit. Anything longer and the skate feels like a cinder block .

Yes, this is just the point I am making. So regardless of the plate I might choose it would seem from the chart I will have to buy a longer plate if I put it on a Riedell boot. Well, I don't have to, but according to the chart it is not recommended. It probably would not be wise to do it unless one knows why Riedell apparently needs a larger plate then the other boots of the same size.

As you pointed out, making you skate longer than need be is not helpful.

"Sure. I skate a 180 on a size 13. 180 on an 11 is a walk in the park."

That is very intriguing!
__________________
Boots: Riedell 297, Plate: R-L Energy, Wheels: R-L Panther Light 55MM 95A, Me: 165 lb, 6'2"

Last edited by netplaceus; January 29th, 2018 at 06:30 AM. Reason: Messed up.
netplaceus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 29th, 2018, 06:45 AM   #11
netplaceus
David
 
netplaceus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: La Mesa, CA
Posts: 145
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dvw View Post
Sure. I skate a 180 on a size 13. 180 on an 11 is a walk in the park.

Of course, I don't know what kind of skating you intend to do. That changes the answer.

"The chart" as it relates to the high end art plates like Snyder, Atlas, Roll Line, etc, is intended as a guide on sizing for traditional art disciplines. If that's what you're doing, chances are that's the neighborhood you should be in. Your coach should be able to steer you.

If you're skating for fun, all bets are off. Plate sizing and position is a very individual thing. I skate short forward, arguably shorter than most. It works for me and I like it. 180mm is actually the upper limit. Anything longer and the skate feels like a cinder block.

But to your original question, no, you likely should not be changing sizes between plate types without some compelling reason to do so.
Quote:
Originally Posted by amohrfeld View Post
First, The charts are really just a starting point. However, The Roll Line chart is fairly accurate. It is more important to determine the position of the ball of the foot and your heel center. Larger plates allow more room for error. Shorter plates must be mounted exactly. The rear wheel should be under the heel center. I disagree that you should focus on the front axle and let the rear fall where it may. You "feel" the front position more but the rear position limits movement or knocks you on your butt if not correct.

I'm using a 170 on a 9.5 boot for both my art skates - dance and freestyle. This is below the recommended length.

My Dance/336 plate is mounted fairly far back. It forces posture, but is brutal when leaning forward. I'm getting used to it though. I just built a Energy/Edea freestyle skate because the Dance/336 is limited to Dance and session skating. No stability to do a jump. I moved the plate forward .090" to get up on the rear wheels easier. Maybe I moved it too much. Time will tell.
Thanks for the feedback, very useful information.
__________________
Boots: Riedell 297, Plate: R-L Energy, Wheels: R-L Panther Light 55MM 95A, Me: 165 lb, 6'2"
netplaceus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 29th, 2018, 02:07 PM   #12
ursle
Street Skater
 
ursle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: NH
Posts: 2,811
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by amohrfeld View Post
First, The charts are really just a starting point. However, The Roll Line chart is fairly accurate. It is more important to determine the position of the ball of the foot and your heel center. Larger plates allow more room for error. Shorter plates must be mounted exactly. The rear wheel should be under the heel center. I disagree that you should focus on the front axle and let the rear fall where it may. You "feel" the front position more but the rear position limits movement or knocks you on your butt if not correct.

I'm using a 170 on a 9.5 boot for both my art skates - dance and freestyle. This is below the recommended length.

My Dance/336 plate is mounted fairly far back. It forces posture, but is brutal when leaning forward. I'm getting used to it though. I just built a Energy/Edea freestyle skate because the Dance/336 is limited to Dance and session skating. No stability to do a jump. I moved the plate forward .090" to get up on the rear wheels easier. Maybe I moved it too much. Time will tell.
If you are jumping and spinning in the air, it would be advantageous to have the wheels as far back and as far forward as possible, well, the front wheels have a sweet spot for take-offs.
But for free skating it's my experience that moving the rear axle to the outside ankle bone is the balance point, in front of the outside ankle bone and it's easy to go over backwards, just behind the outer ankle bone there's no problem concerning going over backwards, makes measuring axle simple, Ah, if you know your front axle point, I like the spot between my big and index toes, well in front of the front ball of the foot but not out at the big toe knuckle, where speed skaters place it, so axle distance is easy.
As an outdoor skater I jump and do 180's over curbs or to turn around to stop.
Shorter axle spacing smaller turns.
ursle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 29th, 2018, 03:05 PM   #13
Doc Sk8
Yankee Catfish
 
Doc Sk8's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Big hill on Mars
Posts: 12,104
Default For what it is worth.....

Roll Line charts are a joke. I run 155s and 160s on my size 9s. I put 170 Roll Lines on size 11s. And yes in my misguided youth, when I did such things, I put short plates on arty boots. No one has burst into flames or exploded.

Take a look @ their cushion recommendations. I run the soft green cushions in all my Roll Lines. (Variant M, Ring, Giotto) and weigh around 210 (95.5kg) right now. Interestingly, the chart says I need the hard yellow cushions, because I weigh over 70kg.. I got news for them I want my sk8s to turn, not stay in a straight line.


Quote:
My question is why do people buy plates that they should not be buying. A Roll Line Dance Plate was designed to cut deep edges doing Artistic Dance. competition
As far as the above goes.... There is no such thing. If I believed that crap concept I would still be rolling Power Tracs and Pro Lines. (I own both, both extensively modified) but seldom put them on. If you are competitive sk8r, buying what the coach / pro tells you is the starting point, not the end all and be all.

Let me give you an excellent example. A fellow won his division @ quad nationals on a pair of sk8s I built him years ago for fun. 395 / OG Snyder Royal. For those that are not aware, the Royal is the light weight racing version of the Imperial, which was never intended for racing. Wait, how can that be?? Simple there is no such thing as this plate or that plate is only intended to do one thing. You have to figure out what works best for you. 9-10 times the book does not contain the answer.
__________________
"The difference between good skates and great skates comes from knowing where to get the numbers."
Doc Sk8 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 29th, 2018, 05:15 PM   #14
fierocious1
Senior Member
 
fierocious1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Texas
Posts: 5,061
Default Long plates for fun.

Some of us like long frames too. 8 inch wbb on a 12 boot
__________________
"Liberal Logic", not possible.... a phrase in conflict with itself....
fierocious1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 29th, 2018, 07:10 PM   #15
amohrfeld
Senior Member
 
amohrfeld's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Houston Texas
Posts: 310
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by netplaceus View Post
You know what? I think I will be sticking with my Mistral plate

I always thought the ideal plate size was determined by your foot size and or measurements of your ball, heel distances. We all agree on that, right?
Yes. However we each have different opinions on plate length and where it is placed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by netplaceus View Post

However, according to the Roll Line chart it is not. If you have a Riedell size 11 boot you will need a 190 plate, but most other boot manufacturers say 180 [U]for the same size foot?
FYI: Riedell boots run large. Edea boots are taller and have a shorter base. You should account for this when sizing a boot and plate.
amohrfeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 29th, 2018, 08:06 PM   #16
netplaceus
David
 
netplaceus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: La Mesa, CA
Posts: 145
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by amohrfeld View Post
Yes. However we each have different opinions on plate length and where it is placed.



FYI: Riedell boots run large. Edea boots are taller and have a shorter base. You should account for this when sizing a boot and plate.
You are right! I emailed Roll-line that is exactly it. Edea and several of the others are sometimes referred to as "competitive" boots and often have a shorter base because the construction emphasizes a compact, lighter boot.

I am not saying they are better, just that the different materials and designs can create a boot that is very tight and close to the foot making it smaller.
So my question is answered
__________________
Boots: Riedell 297, Plate: R-L Energy, Wheels: R-L Panther Light 55MM 95A, Me: 165 lb, 6'2"
netplaceus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 29th, 2018, 09:23 PM   #17
sk84luv
..., therefore, I skate.
 
sk84luv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Southern Oregon
Posts: 1,220
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by netplaceus View Post
You are right! I emailed Roll-line that is exactly it. Edea and several of the others are sometimes referred to as "competitive" boots and often have a shorter base because the construction emphasizes a compact, lighter boot.

I am not saying they are better, just that the different materials and designs can create a boot that is very tight and close to the foot making it smaller.
So my question is answered
I'd love to see how my Mistrals on my 336 would perform on my 297 boots. If the nearest rink to me wasn't 100m, I'd have the old 297 rebuilt, and make the swap from the 336 boots.
__________________
Riedell 336, Roll-Line Mistral, Roll-Line Panthers. Swiss Labyrinth II .
sk84luv is online now   Reply With Quote
Old January 29th, 2018, 09:51 PM   #18
netplaceus
David
 
netplaceus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: La Mesa, CA
Posts: 145
Default

"I have recommended people not to buy the Dance Roll Line plate and they are really happy with the decision."

Oh for Pete's sakes, that is just silly! It's like saying I recommended people not try or buy the XX pizza or YY beer and that they were all happy with their decision.

It not that black & white in reality. It is much like cushions, some like them really soft and some hard for the same kind of skating. Then there are those that never try a different cushion or worse just follow the stupid weight charts. Over time those who never experiment will never know what works best for them.

My hats off to those who understand there are few hard rules when it comes to plates, cushions and wheels. Anyway you look at it the SKATER is
a HUGE unmeasurable factor at what he or she can do with their hardware.

" A Roll Line Dance Plate was designed to cut deep edges doing Artistic Dance."

True, but if you do your homework you will see people are using it for Figure & Rhythm too. There is also interest in Freestyle, Jam, Speed, Derby & Hockey!


" My question is why do people buy plates that they should not be buying"

Sorry, this is just a little arrogant, don't you think?
__________________
Boots: Riedell 297, Plate: R-L Energy, Wheels: R-L Panther Light 55MM 95A, Me: 165 lb, 6'2"
netplaceus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 29th, 2018, 10:02 PM   #19
netplaceus
David
 
netplaceus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: La Mesa, CA
Posts: 145
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sk84luv View Post
I'd love to see how my Mistrals on my 336 would perform on my 297 boots. If the nearest rink to me wasn't 100m, I'd have the old 297 rebuilt, and make the swap from the 336 boots.
I'd love to see how my Mistrals would perform on a 336 boot!
__________________
Boots: Riedell 297, Plate: R-L Energy, Wheels: R-L Panther Light 55MM 95A, Me: 165 lb, 6'2"
netplaceus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 29th, 2018, 11:22 PM   #20
larryoracing
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Lomita, Ca, work in El Segundo, CA
Posts: 960
Smile Netplaceus...Good Decision.

I don't know to much about the Mistral plate, but a couple of people skate on them and like them.

I also don't know much about the 336 boot, but a couple people skate on them and like them. For some people they felt the 336 was too stiff. This was a beginner skater and a National Champion skater, so maybe the 336 might be too stiff for you. Remember this is the top of the line Dance Boot from Riedel, so it makes sense it is a stiffer boot. The 297 is the accepted standard.

Here's an ideal that really might make some good sense, but it might mean you might have to make a change in plate length in the future. I thought the last time I inquired a year ago the "EXTRA" cost from Riedell for a pair of custom boots is 200 dollars (in addition to the original cost of the boots). What they do is measure each foot 7 different ways and custom tailor a boot for each foot. Nothing will give you better bang for your buck than a pair of custom made boots.

After getting a pair of custom made boots you will need to go to a shorter plate for optimum performance. Upgrade to the Energy plate.

sincerely,

Larry Otani and good luck!
larryoracing is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 01:24 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.