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Quad Roller Skating Forum Discussions about quad roller skates and any other quad skating discussions that do not seem appropriate for one of our other forums.

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Old January 3rd, 2018, 01:00 AM   #61
ursle
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No it started with this post, a claim to show a backwards hockey stop, which was posted to Facebook, so it’s invisible.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mort View Post
I'll post a backwards T stop, backwards plow stop, the 1 foot variants, and a coveted backwards hockey stop video tomorrow.

Maybe even a backwards hockey to lateral takeoff on the fly without actually comming to a stop.
Then it went to this:

It just takes practice. Mainly confidence is the key. We use 78a (atom roadhogs to 90A(cosmic superflys) outdoors. Typically we roll atom poisons outside, great middle ground wheel with good vibration dampening, honestly one of my favorites. Way better than roll line heliums.
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We have a poster recommending that people do outside hockey stops, I simply objected.

Now we’ve got a discussion about orthotics going on and, good.
Except, it takes comprehension, which is lacking, but the insults, ahhh, the insults

And now

Impact absorption is all thats needed. Too much impact absorbtions leads to bad from because you cant feel the problems you're creating. Until its too late, when your knees are thrashed ....
Inserting all this hoopla padding into a skate decreases the volume available in the skate, obsucing a good fit, elevating you further from the bead of the skate boot, increases leverages on your feet and ankles and choking the circulation in the foot... causing issues, then people lace more loosely, and their feet slip, and slip even more with stupid synthetic socks that have poor friction qualities. The o ly solution here is to buy a sock that fits tightly, and will not bunch up no matter what it is made from.
You need to realize your information is FLAWED, and completely one sided.
I have minimal padding in my skates and shoes. May times I take the insoles out because theres simply too much.
Who in their right mind would take foot advice from someone that lubricates their feet with lotion before skating? **rotflol** the needs of skating require your boot to become a second skin max friction to PREVEBT SLIPPAGE!. Not a pedicurist massaging oils into your foot as it rolls around inside the boot giving terrible feedback and responsiveness.
Unless you have something to contribute to the OP question of "How to stop backwards other than using toestops?" Or at the very least what is wrong with the ways I did my stopping techniques, quit going OT.


I have no idea how this jumble of words might have ever been relevant to the orthotics I’m describing, someone is confusing themselves, and may I add, I find the ineptness to follow the conversation funny.

So let me start over
Custom orthotics are extremely thin, they take less room than the factory inserts under the heel and front ball of the foot, so they take up less volume, they have no padding, they simply hold the heel and toes in place and support the arch perfectly, as well as giving 100% support to the whole foot, if one were outside walking in sand the sand would do exactly the same thing, if one puts their foot into a flat sole, the foot has no support, the arch has no support, the heel slides, the toes can curl easily, and when the foot moves around, friction causes heat and heat causes blisters, Ah, lotion is great for absorbing heat, and keeping friction at bay, this is easily understood, but without actually trying orthotics yet denying they work, ha.

And to make matters clear, every time some inept advice shows up on the log, it’s in everyone’s interest to slap it down before someone else gets hurt, bad advice is easily misunderstood, and when-if someone doesn’t understand the conversation, well bad advice is more than possible.

And...Facebook posts are invisible, and as thoughtful as trying to have the forum host photos, the forum instructs posters to use third party sites to host photos, but of course the obtuse members ignore the rules.
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Old January 3rd, 2018, 01:05 AM   #62
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Lol.
Its always the same.
Armchair experts.
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Old January 3rd, 2018, 01:06 AM   #63
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rufusprime99 View Post
Not to mention, people don't hear what you say, they hear what THEY hear. You tell someone to do exactly this, and you are right there, in their presence, and they say, yeah, I get it. Then they do it, and it is NOT what you told them. LOLOL

This is like horseshoes or hand grenades. Give em a rough description, and with a bit of luck, they'll get the message. To be really precise, you have to be there. Not so much to give a precise description, but to correct individual quirks and errors. I was showing a lady how to toe stop the other day. I told her to put a toe back, then sink her weight down, and that will bring pressure on the toe. Instead, she sank her weight down FIRST, , THEN put her toe back. It worked for her, so I said, F it. If it worked, it worked.
Yeap!

When I was a kid, my friend and I were jumping into the deep end at the edge of the pool, turning around under water, and rocketing to the surface to grab the edge and jump out.

My sister wanted to k ow what we were doing, I explained.. she instead jumped in and turned around in air hitting her chin on the edge of the pool... 3 stitches later.... lol


Sometimes we are too gauge with describing things, sometimes the listener/reader is not paying enough attention, or gets in a rush.
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Old January 3rd, 2018, 01:21 AM   #64
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Anyone else have Facebook and have trouble looking up the videos I posted?

Sorry I don't have a YouTube to upload it to at the moment. If the OP has FB, then I don't give a crap what you have Ursle.

I didn't say for anyone to go outdoors and do any stops, just saying for outdoor use we use those wheels, and can do hockey stops just fine. We practice them ALOT, so when going outdoors its a non issue. My point is it IS possible. The kids that I take outdoors from time to time have 1 to 5 years experience, and nearly all of them can hockey stop forwards and backwards. Even some of the new to skating adults can.

Get on topic man.

No one gives a crap about your orthodic debate.

If the OP does not habe facebook, I'll be happy to send them the files via email.
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Old January 3rd, 2018, 01:24 AM   #65
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I dont do facebook.
But i watched your videos.That floor seems slippery.
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Old January 3rd, 2018, 03:17 AM   #66
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I dont do facebook.
But i watched your videos.That floor seems slippery.
It's dusty usually, but when swept very grippy.

The coating is still there, just a very dull sheen to it. It's not bare wood, yet lol. Maple rounda. The one good thing about the rinks floor is that you can only get on/off at the very ends, so no kids to step out in front of you all over the place.

The other good thing is that though its dusty most days, the grip is consistent everywhere.

Also there is NO carpet. So the lobby stays mopped, and that keeps the grip in check. The lobby is kept very clean.(think food debris. Oils, sodas etc)
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Old January 3rd, 2018, 03:32 AM   #67
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Quote:
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...and support the arch perfectly...
Arches don't need supporting. In fact, that would be a bad thing for ANY arch. An arch, by definition, has AIR under it. The human arched foot is an incredible design that evolved and endured for a couple million years, somehow, without artificial support. Many people have foot problems CAUSED by arch "supports" from childhood. Thankfully, my parents were on a tight budget and supplied me with the cheapest sneakers money could buy - without arch support. To this day I have textbook arches and do not have use or need for supporting them in any sport I have ever taken part in, including quad or inline skates. I'll be 60 next April and have lived on skates since 7 years of age, with metal-wheeled skates clamped and strapped to those cheap sneakers. Now I have more high end skates, none of which came supplied with arch support BTW, and regularly skate 30-50 miles, magically without arch supporting hardware.

I'm not telling you "Don't do it", just saying no one should be telling people to "support" their arches (except through donations to the National Park System).


Credit: Physics of Arches


Credit


Credit
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Old January 3rd, 2018, 05:59 AM   #68
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Thank God, someone gets it.

Thank you sir, for being informed, and researching whats real and whats a quack, like the orthodic BS that was pushed so hard for so long, which is a bandaid fix for bad posture and weak feet.(excluding medical issues like malformed bone structures)
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Old January 3rd, 2018, 11:36 AM   #69
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Ha, so I’m not talking about myself, I’m talking about the population, and I’m talking about sport orthotics, and I will make my point again.....
A sport orthotic will support the heel, keep it in place, and each toe.
The foot won’t move around, causing friction which will lead to blisters, it will support the arch and keep the ankle from being out of alignment, or leaning one way or the other, if you supinate, when it was made it was formed to straighten the ankle and straighten things out, same if you pronate, vs, putting the foot into a flat bottomed shoe and sliding around, wasting time twisting your ankle over to get support for the direction you want to go, the time to get that support may be milliseconds, but as you change direction continuously, milliseconds add up.
The friction caused by constantly shifting adds up into blisters.
So wet your feet and walk on a dry floor and look at the prints, I have perfect arches, but....I use sport orthotics to increase my enjoyment of the activities I enjoy, generally, people don’t have perfect arches, they should least have the opportunity to learn the facts.

@Joey, thanks for your opinion, I’m not talking about myself but the general population, and I’m talking about sport orthotics, and will again say, try a pair for sports before judging.

@mort, thanks for you negativity, lack of comprehension and rudeness, but also thanks for your bad advice, it’s a pleasure to correct you, two sides of any issue are reality, and your inability to comprehend always makes my day, so put on some glitter and go impress the pre-teens


Livestrong
The Importance of Arch Support
The arch is perhaps the most important structural feature of our feet, which bear 200,000 to 300,000 lbs. of stress each mile we walk. Arches absorb the brunt of the pressure our bodies thrust upon our feet with each stride. Arch height may vary significantly from person to person. It may also change as a person ages, or as the result of various medical conditions. Properly supporting the arch can prevent a variety of musculoskeletal problems that can lead to inactivity and even disability.




Types of Arches

People with little or no arch can usually observe this by standing in bare feet in front of a mirror--the lack of arch should be obvious if the sole of your foot rests entirely or almost entirely on the floor. If you’re unsure of the shape of your foot relative to what is considered normal, the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons recommends trying this simple test: dip the bottom of your foot in water, and take a normal stride over a surface where you’ll be able to make out the footprint left behind. Flat feet with low arches will have little curve from the big toe to the heel, while high-arched feet will leave prints with a skinny strip from the heel to the ball of the foot.



Changes in Arch Shape

Pregnant women may find that their arches flatten somewhat with the added pressure that weight gain places on their feet. The American Podiatric Medical Association advises pregnant women to choose comfortable shoes with good shock absorption to relieve some of the stress on the foot that a lower arch fails to prevent. They may want to wear over-the-counter molded inserts to provide additional arch support. According to the Arthritis Foundation, people with rheumatoid arthritis may develop a flattened arch, which will require additional support. Age itself may bring about changes in foot shape through fluid retention, relaxing ligaments and the effects of gravity and weight over a lifetime

Pronation

People with low arches may tend to “overpronate,” which means the foot rotates too far inward with each step. Alternatively, a high arch can cause the foot to roll too far outward, or "underpronate." Proper support is important for both types of arches.

Results of Pronation

The extreme inward foot motion caused by pronation forces the knee and hip out of alignment. This movement places added pressure through the knee, shin, thigh, pelvis and back. The excessive foot rotation can lead to foot and ankle injuries, achilles tendonitis, heel pain, kneecap inflammation, bunions, shin splints, ailments of the hip and lower back, as well as injury to muscles, tendons and ligaments in the lower leg.

Proper Arch Support

Support low or high arches with well-fitting, appropriate footwear, particularly for athletic activities--this simple step can help prevent the many problems that can result from over- or underpronation. People with low arches should look for shoes classified as “motion control.” These shoes give added stability on the inside of the foot where the arch tends to collapse, preventing excessive inward rolling. People with high arches should consider “cushioning” shoes--these shoes have a curved shape that encourages the foot to roll more inward.

Orthotics

Some people with especially low or high arches should consider orthotic inserts. A podiatrist or physical therapist can help determine whether custom orthotics are right for you. You can buy less expensive, preformed orthotics at pharmacies and sporting goods stores.

Last edited by ursle; January 3rd, 2018 at 12:39 PM.
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Old January 3rd, 2018, 11:41 AM   #70
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Exercises to Improve the Arch of the Foot
by NICOLE CRAWFORD Last Updated: Sep 11, 2017


in some cases, the arches may not develop as much as they should, resulting in a condition known as flat feet. Arches may also fall later in life, due to stress on the feet. Although this is a common condition and usually no cause for concern, occasionally it may result in chronic pain and discomfort. Exercise your feet regularly to improve your arches and overall foot health, and consult a doctor if you experience chronic pain.


Go Barefoot

Shoes are practical and good, but if your shoes do not provide adequate arch support, they may contribute to foot problems. To improve your arches and benefit overall foot health, try to go barefoot as much as possible. Start by walking slowly with bare feet, then increase intensity. If you have access to a beach, you can give you arches a great workout by walking barefoot in the sand one or two times each week.



Yoga for the Feet

According to Aadil Palkhivala of "Yoga Journal," yoga offers many benefits for improved foot arches. He recommends sitting in virasana pose for 10 minutes each day before bed or after you wake up. To perform virasana, kneel on the floor and press the knees together. Slide the feet out until they are a bit wider than your hips, keeping the tops of your feet against the floor. Try to sit back all the way between your feet, or place a rolled towel under your buttocks if you can't make it all the way down. If you experience cramping, you can also massage your feet while in the pose.

Ballerina Workout

A ballerina's feet may be the epitome of beautiful arches. Dancescape recommends a few simple exercises to improve the height of your arches, such as toe curls. Sit on the floor with your legs extended in front of you. Point your feet and toes, and hold for three to five seconds. Next, keep your foot arched, but try to flex only your toes. Hold for three to five seconds, then point the toes. Repeat this about 10 times. This exercise is particularly beneficial for the upper arches.

Achilles Tendon Exercises

According to MayoClinic.com, flat feet may be the result of a shortened Achilles tendon. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons recommends doing calf stretches to stretch and strengthen the Achilles tendon. Lean forward against a wall, then bring your right foot forward and bend the knee, as if doing a lunge. Try to lower the back foot completely to the ground, and hold for 10 seconds, then repeat on the other side.
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Old January 3rd, 2018, 12:43 PM   #71
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Default Still off topic

Ursle....

2 full posts of completely off topic garbage.

You realize your 2 consecutive posts only make your orthodic proposal less viable?. Well for anyone who can read, and understand "may want to" or "can prevent" are not exactly synonymous with being a good idea.

You only show that other sites have agreed with the idea that they can benefit people with improperly formed structures, or bad posture.

Are you ever going to help with the stopping skills as requested by the OP? OR just carry on about your own jacked up feet and terrible posture that needed correcting by orthodics?
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Old January 3rd, 2018, 12:55 PM   #72
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See post #11, if you don’t comprehend #11, lmk, I’ll draw you a picture.

Oh, btw, I’m going to go alpine snowboarding today, and guess what?
I have sports orthotics in my boots, they’re in my custom made foam liners, excellent heel hold, ten years on them and they are like new, and guess what, every alpine snowboarder has sport orthotics underfoot, and most ski racers, can you imagine that, a group of people that actually understand the foot and the balance required for certain sports, wow, what a big world.
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Old January 30th, 2018, 03:19 AM   #73
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Oh my gosh, my post on stopping while rexing turned into a bloody orthopedics
war! I have not looked here in weeks... LOL!
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Old January 30th, 2018, 12:47 PM   #74
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I skimmed pretty far through and never really got a definition of recinh...... being new to the forum (and apparently the terminology used bow days), what is “Rexing”???
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Old January 30th, 2018, 12:58 PM   #75
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I skimmed pretty far through and never really got a definition of recinh...... being new to the forum (and apparently the terminology used bow days), what is “Rexing”???
Rexing, technically, is a mixed couple skating backwards in a figure eight, both keeping all eight wheels on the floor, both constantly crossing their legs in front then back, keeping tempo to the music.

I Rex outdoors on a basketball court listening to Biggie' on pandora, for flexion and entertainment.
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Old January 30th, 2018, 12:59 PM   #76
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Oh my gosh, my post on stopping while rexing turned into a bloody orthopedics
war! I have not looked here in weeks... LOL!

You mean orthotic
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Old January 30th, 2018, 06:53 PM   #77
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Originally Posted by ursle View Post
Rexing, technically, is a mixed couple skating backwards in a figure eight, both keeping all eight wheels on the floor, both constantly crossing their legs in front then back, keeping tempo to the music.

I Rex outdoors on a basketball court listening to Biggie' on pandora, for flexion and entertainment.
Copy that thanks sir
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Old January 30th, 2018, 10:21 PM   #78
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ursle View Post
You mean orthotic
Yes, thanks.
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