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Beginning Skaters Forum This is the place for beginning skaters to ask questions and share their stories. We would love to hear about your experiences learning to skate. No question is too dumb!

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Old May 25th, 2010, 07:16 PM   #21
Bidimus
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Oh, a couple points I missed. As if I hadn't written a book.

I've found evening sessions at the rink, especially week days, to be more beginner friendly. Fewer random obstacles (kids) to navigate around.

If you haven't skated before or it's been a while see if you rink offers beginner classes. Most do and it helps to refine your technique.

Learning to stop is highly under rated. It helps to avoid using those pads in the first place.
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Old May 25th, 2010, 07:43 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by khcrafter View Post
Thank you Bidimus for your post... it was great to read, and just what I needed to hear about trying, so I am now trying to find a pair of skates, and found out the other there is a Dick's sporting goods, so I'm going to call and see if they have quads in store so I can try some on.
Check with your local rink. They often sell skates. I tried Dick's when I was looking and they didn't carry quads in store. The rinks seem to often carry a better quality skate than what Dick's has anyway.
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Old May 25th, 2010, 07:49 PM   #23
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Bidimus, your story is so close to mine it is scary. I, too, used my kids as an excuse. It's really all about me. I am just lucky that they enjoy it, too.
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Old May 25th, 2010, 08:03 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by Reserector View Post
Bidimus, your story is so close to mine it is scary. I, too, used my kids as an excuse. It's really all about me. I am just lucky that they enjoy it, too.
It's it great. I've gotten the whole family into it now. Even the wife got new skates for her birthday. The best is my 5 year old though. She loves going with me and I think I have a future derby girl or speed skater in the works here.
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Old May 25th, 2010, 08:22 PM   #25
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Cool RE: Story

Quote:
Originally Posted by Reserector View Post
Bidimus, your story is so close to mine it is scary. I, too, used my kids as an excuse. It's really all about me. I am just lucky that they enjoy it, too.
Same for me! All you gotta do is change the name at the top!

Got my wife skating and my 2 1/2 year old daughter started, putting on skates this week all by herself and pulls herself up on the nearest stationary object! She just kinda shuffles her feet and she may only go 1 foot in five minutes, but it's a start! After watching all of us skate she is so excited to get going I feel like by the time she's 3 it will be old hat for her!!
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Old May 25th, 2010, 09:06 PM   #26
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She just kinda shuffles her feet and she may only go 1 foot in five minutes, but it's a start!
Awesome. The big breakthrough for mine was when a staff member told her to walk like a duck/penguin. Feet in a V shape and waddle stiff legged. The foot position and motion is so close it creates the right forward momentum and it's an image the kids have an easier time understanding. Give it a shot with the skates off and see if she "gets it". If so try with the skates on.
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Old May 25th, 2010, 09:11 PM   #27
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Default Good Indoor skates make poor outdoor skates

Almost NO single off-the-shelf skate designs available will work DECENTLY (not well) both indoors and outdoors. There are two exceptions:
1) the Roller-Derby Alpha1 (or Aerial) model, with adjustable front axle and super wheels that perform fairly well indoors (if your're willing to exercise more) and super well outdoors.


2) The "Blue Love" skate which even has re-positioning of BOTH axles, but the wheels are more for outdoors only at 70mm & 78A firmness:



True, you can throw some softer, so-called outdoor wheels on certain off-the-shelf indoor skates and do a little better skating outside, but only if the outdoor surfaces are VERY SMOOTH will this be all that pleasant an experience.

This post gives more details on the issue of building optimized outdoor skates:
http://skatelogforum.com/forums/show...2&postcount=37

This long thread also gives lots of good background info from MULTIPLE perspectives, not just mine:
http://skatelogforum.com/forums/show...timize+outdoor

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Old May 25th, 2010, 10:01 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reserector View Post
Bidimus, your story is so close to mine it is scary. I, too, used my kids as an excuse. It's really all about me. I am just lucky that they enjoy it, too.
+1

I'm wondering how many of us fall into that category, eh?

S
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Old May 26th, 2010, 08:05 AM   #29
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If you are over 230#+ you will want harder wheels, usually 97A or so. !
Not on quads outdoors - you'll shake your body to bits
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Old May 26th, 2010, 12:46 PM   #30
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I skate inlines outdoors and quads indoors. How you stand up in them? First, you try. It really isn't all that hard actually, like ice skates. Smaller wheels, like 80s, are easier to stay balanced. Beginners actually pronate like this /\ until they learn to get on top of those wheels and build ankle strength (or if they have an adjustable frame, it can be moved in to compensate for pronation). They kep to inlines is proper fit -very tight and snug, so the foot can't move around the the skate and the heel can't lift. I see way to many kids and adults wearing inlines at the rink and just flopping around inside them. That makes it so hard to skate. Not to mention the strain they will feel later.. ouch!
If you want to try inline skates out of a box from the sporting good store, you can measure you foot by standing heel against the wall, and using a tape measure to measure in cm. Then look for a k2 skate and look for a size close to that cm measurement. You will get the best fit that way.
Most skates will come with 80-82a softness wheels. The softer the wheel outside(80a), the smoother the ride b/c pebbles etc just absorb into the wheel when you roll over them, BUT the tradeoff is that they might feel really slow and take some effort to get rolling. If you are on smooth pavement you can use 85-86a durometer wheels.



This is intersting video... this guy is for the first time skating with 100mm wheels in speed skates. First time on the pavement you can see how he pronates... but after a little while as he gets more comfortable he gets better.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XUQbb3EB9qw

Then he gets some dryland skating tips and see how he gets better...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AG_9s...eature=related
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Old May 26th, 2010, 03:40 PM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fierocious1 View Post
If you are over 230#+ you will want harder wheels, usually 97A or so.
Quote:
Originally Posted by peter View Post
Not on quads outdoors - you'll shake your body to bits
I trhink he's talking Indoors!? 97's as opposed to something in the low 90's or outdoor wheels in the high 80's. I agree with this although it kind of depends on the floor of the rink you go to. My regular rink has very little coating on it and is maybe a little slick so 93-94's work good with my 245lbs. a grippier floor with heavy coating will need the harder wheels!!
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Old May 26th, 2010, 03:55 PM   #32
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In simple terms.....

I find it easier to skate indoors and more convenient. I don't see folks wearing pads and if you fall you tend to slide on the floor - much better than falling outside.

Trying rink skates is OK, but having your own is better. You can order on-line and if they don't fit return and not pay shipping either way. You will not find much if any choice in skates at a sporting goods store.

The rinks will tell you there slow times just call and ask what sessions are beginner friendly.

Many rinks you can rent Artistic style boots, Derby Style, and Inline.

Much to learn but most rinks offer simple lessons to get you going for about $10. And answer many questions.

I have skated on our tennis courts in the neighborhood with no problem, but there is something to be said for indoors and air-conditioning.

I am sure you have a 1000 questions but many you can find here on the board. Welcome to the journey of skating.
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Old May 26th, 2010, 06:36 PM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by khcrafter View Post
I have never tried inline skates, and i guess my newbie question is ... how do you even stand up and balance on them? I do see more choices in the stores for them, but I just thought quads would be more safe for me to even stand up.

I have seen some "derby" advertisements, but at this point I'm just really looking for some exercise.

If you are interested in inline skating,
If you've had ice skating experience, there's a simple answer--it's just like ice skating!

if you haven't, the best way I can explain it is that while in a standing, non-moving position, your feet, as they would be in quads, are parallel the ground, but it takes more strength, control, and balance to keep them in that position. Once you get moving, you'll be centering your weight over the non-pushing leg, while pushing off with the inside edge of the other skate. Stability in this scenario comes from, again, strength, control, and balance, but also from inertia.
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Old May 26th, 2010, 09:03 PM   #34
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There isn't a difference in how people stand up in inlines or quads. Your center of gravity hovers above the area between your skates, that is the foundation of your balance, and your legs keep you up. The real difference between inline skates and roller skates is how your feet hold up the weight. Roller skates are more stable in the sense that your ankles don't threaten snap inwards or outwards, because your feet are on a solid "table" (2x2 wheels). Inlines are a bit more precarious, but the buckle at the cuff of the skate prevents your foot from bending inwards or outwards (or as the med folks call it, evert/invert) and spraining your ankle.

===

My personal story on in-shape-ness is that after graduating from high school in 1999, I fell into a rut of low activity, too much food, and too much gaming and bad lifestyle. I gained probably 30 lbs in college, and easily weighed 210lbs (I'm 5'10") after 4 years (I should have laid off that orange juice and scurvy scare). The only physical activity I did in college was to inline skate to and from class (rare), and maybe to the local supermarket, which pretty much meant no exercise whatsoever. Delaying things even more, I broke my wrist in a skating mishap in late 2003 (wasn't wearing my wrist guards properly). Once I was out of the cast and the weather was nice, I started to skate as a way to get out and to get a little exercise.

In the first year (2004), I couldn't do more than 3-4 miles at a time at a slow pace, and I only skated four or five times a month. I eventually built up slowly to about 8-9 miles by 2007, but I was still quite slow (I think I calculated 8mph). I honestly didn't have much of a reason to really want to improve quickly.

My dive into serious skating came in 2008 when I planned to visit college friends in SF and LA, where I also wanted to catch the Friday Night Skates in those cities. I had caught an LA night skate back in college and I wanted to do it again. It really gave me motivation to build up my fitness level to about 10-13 miles so I could tolerate the speeds and distances the night skates went. Granted, I was still pretty slow (still at around 8-9mph), but I was able to survive those skates and still have tons of fun.

Now, it's 2010 and I think my fitness has hit a whole different level since then (and I got new skates, albeit not the most ideal). I've started doing regular 15-mile skates (no, I don't post my adventures in the Fitness subforum, but on Twitter (~188mi ytd, pretty good, considering my schedule, and excluding ice skating sessions and speed skating training)). At first, I could only complete the 15-mile skates after about 90 minutes (10mph) last October, but I've been able to shave it down to approximately 70 (just over 12mph), and I'm still looking to improve and get tougher and faster. This is all to help build up for the Chicagoland marathon in July. And I've ordered race skates to help feed my need for speed on top of the fitness I'm already doing.

I'm already excited to be done with finals next week, so I can really start piling on the miles and workouts... And also get my new skates, which is apparently slated to arrive in mid July :/

From there, who knows. I'm planning to attend at least a marathon a year, time willing, which there isn't much of. But I do plan to keep pushing myself to go faster. I honestly don't think I've been so fit before in my life. Granted, I do still weigh about 200lbs and apparently fall into the "overweight" category for the Columbia Station half-marathon, but I'm a lot less pudgy than I was back in 2003, and I think I can haul ass pretty good for a guy my size.

Don't worry about being out of shape. If you enjoy skating enough, you'll want to be in shape so you can enjoy the perks that come with it.
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Old May 26th, 2010, 09:55 PM   #35
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Chaos- have you done Chicagoland yet? If not, work on those loooong uphills. Just a tip for you...
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Old May 26th, 2010, 10:12 PM   #36
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Define "long"
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Old May 27th, 2010, 04:05 PM   #37
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Define "long"
This link has some good footage of some areas. Ok, they may not seem too far, but when you're tired, they feel long... It is a good course. I skated the half last yr.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OxkeOy5gyKQ
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Old May 27th, 2010, 09:20 PM   #38
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I think you already know you shouldn't be cheap choosing which skates to buy, however, keep in mind that it's easier and safer to learn in _slow_ skates than on faster ones. My advice would be that you go for something like that K2's Mach9 (so you have a nice boot and frame) but use different wheels and bearings than the ones shipped with the skates, at least during the first month. Buy in eBay the cheapest ABEC bearings you can find and some soft wheels (like 80mm/78A) they will make the skates slow and you'll have less problems controlling your balance and rhythm. From that you can work your way up to the original wheels and bearings (and beyond
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