S k a t e L o g     F o r u m
Inline Skating and Quad Roller Skating
Forum Hosts: Jessica Wright | Kathie Fry

FOLLOW US: Our Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Email    


Home - Forum Index - Africa Skating - Asia Skating - Europe Skating - Oceania Skating - Pan America Skating - Roller_Rinks - Friend the SkateLog Forum in Facebook - SkateLog Forum on Facebook

Forum Administrators: Jessica Wright and Kathie Fry | Email Us
Access code for buying and selling subforums: "skates"
How To Get a User Account and Posting Privileges in the SkateLog Forum
Use Google to Search the SkateLog Forum

Go Back   SkateLog Forum > Special Interest Skating Forums (sorted by number of posts) > Slalom Cone Skating Forum
FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Slalom Cone Skating Forum Discussions about slalom cone skating, high-jump, and other freestyle trick skating. (Note that vert, street, and park skating discussions should be posted in our aggressive skating forum.)

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old September 22nd, 2012, 02:02 AM   #1
crashpants
Boo!
 
crashpants's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Washington DC
Posts: 666
Default Homemade Cones

I know these are smaller than what I see as 'regulation' but since I'm just starting out, they'll work for now. Solo 3 OZ cups on 7/8" washers. Yes, I know that doesn't compute to the rest of the world using the correct measuring system, but that's all I know. I have to do this outdoors, so the washers help against the wind. Clear packing tape. Total cost for 80 cups and 15 washers - $8.



Tomorrow is the first run at this slalom stuff! I like the teensie plastic cups because if I fall on them, they will crush.
__________________
If we irritate a quack at the right frequency, we get a loon.
crashpants is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 25th, 2012, 11:57 PM   #2
GregT
Senior Member
 
GregT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Atlanta, GA -- US
Posts: 396
Default

Ok, $8 is nearly 1/3 the cost of true slalom cones. Just wanted to point that out because a lot of people try to avoid paying $30 for slalom cones and end up spending more total through their various iterations of home-made cones.

I think I can confidently say that EVERYONE, once they finally mortgage the house for those $30 Seba cones, ask themselves "what the hell was I thinking?" regarding the stop-gap solutions.

True slalom cones provide a much safer, transportable, lightweight, and pleasant experience (especially once the wind kicks up) than pretty much anything you can make. Really, take my word for it. If you want to spend any time slaloming, you'll not regret buying a 20-pack of dedicated freestyle cones.

And this from a guy that has bought several sets of Ikea cups for slalom in the past.

Safety- slalom cones will not collapse under your skate, and, when hit, will quickly slide to the side and out of your way (you'll find this a big point when you really get into slaloming). I don't want to sound biased regarding my brand, but I think this is where Seba cones shine over other brands. The old "Star" cones were a soft rubber that would collapse when hit, sometimes stick between your wheels. Ugh. And the Powerslide cones have a sharp base that is very grippy on the ground and don't slide well when kicked.

Comfort- Seba cones collapse easily under your weight if you fall on them. Don't worry, you can easily pop them back (the cones, not your dislocated arm) in place once you've recovered from the fall. Note that Seba has just released a new "soft tipped" cone ($10 extra/set) that is even softer when your body hits it. I won a couple sets of these cones at a recent competition, but, to be honest, I've not even tried them because I think the old style collapse well enough not to hurt me when I fall on them. I guess disposable cups won't hurt too bad, but the old Ikea cups did not collapse. You'll not forget being impaled on an Ikea cup.

Transportability - Dedicated slalom cones stack in a surprisingly small area (and are very light). Thus, they don't take up much space in your bag (you can even stuff a full set of 20 inside your skate). In comparison, Ikea cups take about 4 times much space for 20 cones.

Durability - I own I think 6 20-packs of slalom cones, but I still have only opened the first two packs I ever bought. I've never "broken" a cone, but I have kicked a few down the gutter or into the ocean. Most homemade solutions only last a short time before you need to replace them.

The cones I use are like this:

http://skatecrazy.net/products/slalom-cones
GregT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 26th, 2012, 12:06 AM   #3
GregT
Senior Member
 
GregT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Atlanta, GA -- US
Posts: 396
Default

Oh, while I'm on my soapbox.

The one other piece of equipment you need to buy now is a tape measure. IN METRIC.

No, your current tape measure doesn't have millimeter ticks. So go out and buy one. Metric. Home Depot. $10. Be sure to get one that is long enough to lay out at least 10 cones at a time (so 11 x 80cm = ?). A lot of people prefer the very long fabric tape measures on a big reel that allow you to set up a very long line of cones in one fail swoop. But I find that contraption a bit hard to fit into my pocket or skate bag.

Things I don't suggest
=================
1) English-system (inches) tape measure - the conversion to inches is confusing and your cone spacing will be off no matter how hard you try. Not necessarily a big problem, until you ever try to skate on someone else's line of cones. Easier to drop $10 and just get a metric tape.

2) Yard stick - too short. Your line will end up very uneven

3) String with 80cm marks - EVERYONE tries this in the beginning. It seems like a good idea at first. Problems are: a) the string just gets tangled when stored, so you waste much time each session untangling it before use, and b) the string will stretch as you extend it, resulting in inaccurate spacing, and c) it's too light weight, making it very difficult to use without 3 people (one to hold each end and one to mark) if there is any wind at all.
GregT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 26th, 2012, 12:10 AM   #4
GregT
Senior Member
 
GregT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Atlanta, GA -- US
Posts: 396
Default

Um, some optional equipment:

1) chalk - well, not really optional. Unless you want to paint permanent marks, chalk is very easy to see. Even if you have permanent marks, chalk can be used to further highlight the existing marks.

2) carpenter's crayon - DougP from Seattle taught me this one. When you are marking a new line, use carpenter's crayon to make the mark. The crayon is not too dark, so the cops won't give you a rough time. But the mark is waterproof and lasts a surprisingly long time on pavement. Just highlight the marks with chalk as needed before a slalom session. And you might want to occasionally go back over your crayon marks to ensure they don't get completely worn down over time. Again, you can get carpenter crayons at your local hardware store for a few bucks.
GregT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 26th, 2012, 02:10 AM   #5
crashpants
Boo!
 
crashpants's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Washington DC
Posts: 666
Default

Thanks Greg, I do value your advice.

I wasn't really sure I was going to be able to do this, hence the interim homemade cones. Even with all my frustration the first time out, I'm hooked. I'll spring for the real deal soon enough, I promise!

Down on the bottom shelf, Home Despot had a 25 foot - 7.5 meter combo imperial/metric tape measure for only $4. I like the chalk idea, I used a Sharpie on an outdoor concrete basketball court and the marks were hard to see after kicking the cones out of place. Also, note to self, go ahead and 'own' the court because setting up in one corner is too cramped.
__________________
If we irritate a quack at the right frequency, we get a loon.
crashpants is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 26th, 2012, 03:09 AM   #6
GregT
Senior Member
 
GregT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Atlanta, GA -- US
Posts: 396
Default

Sounds good crashpants. And if the black sharpie mark is visible and doesn't wear too quickly, you can stick with that and just highlight the marks with chalk. My crayon suggestion was more for places where you worried about permanent marks. I've not had much problem with cops when chalk is all they see.

Have fun dude.
GregT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 1st, 2012, 04:07 AM   #7
Metaphor
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Toronto
Posts: 60
Default

I've cut plastic ping pong balls in half to use as cones--but haven't actually gotten around to trying them yet! (Kinda scared to skate over top of them lol)
Metaphor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 23rd, 2014, 03:03 PM   #8
shortlineflyer
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 11
Default

So last week I went to the dollar tree store looking for something to use for cones and found it. Dollar tree has individual cupcake holders in sets of 3. they are about 2 inches high and about 3 inches in diameter. they are made of hard red plastic. they work great. i bought 4 sets of them for 4 dollars total. they are not the sturdiest but if you fall on them they break right apart so I figured they are better than Ikea cups. Plus if you break them it no big deal because they are so cheap.
shortlineflyer is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 10:25 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.