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Old January 1st, 2011, 02:01 AM   #41
Big Mike
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Okay, here is why I don't wear anything, and I love going dangerously fast.
1. It looks silly, makes me feel stupid. (I know bad reason)
2. It's WAY too restrictive for me, I would fall at least 10 times as much.
3. It's dangerous for me, the last bad fall I had I rolled feet over head and had my head UNDER me. If I would have had a helmet on I would have snapped my neck.
4. It would break on me anyways, I'm 275lbs going at least 15 in circles(rink) and I know the forces involved would break anything lighter than Aluminum.

Now I'm not one to cave into peer pressure at all, surrounded by quads all day yet I have obviously red speed inlines with bright blue wheels. The looking silly is for me, and the rest is so I can still skate.

Just my take, I understand the risks just don't care much because it really isn't worth it to try to prevent them. Anyways, the people I see using pads and helmets don't need them.
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Old January 1st, 2011, 10:54 AM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Mike View Post
4. It would break on me anyways, I'm 275lbs going at least 15 in circles(rink) and I know the forces involved would break anything lighter than Aluminum.
Helmets are fundamentally designed to break. The goal is for the helmet to absorb the impact and break so that your skull doesn't break.

Remember, it's not always the speed, it's the drop. When your skates fly out from under you and you whip your head into the ground there are times when that force is much greater than you'd get from stumbling to the ground with your weight still in your feet, then transferred to your knees, hands etc, before finally bonking your head. Drop a pumpkin 8 feet onto concrete it's gonna be a much bigger mess than if you roll it down a flight of stairs 8 feet down.

Have a safe and Happy New Year, skaters.
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Old January 1st, 2011, 02:24 PM   #43
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im personally fully aware of risks of not wearing pads and falling, and i refuse to wear them. wrist, knee, elbow or helmet.

helmet: ive fallen with a helmet and without, and had a much more serious injury from the helmet, which jarred my neck rather seriously for 2 weeks as it gripped heavily on the surface. that said, if i was playing hockey, or doing agressive/grinds, i would definately be wearing one, so does very heavily depend on what sort of skating you are doing.

wrist guards: got told by a specialist i was lucky i wasnt wearing one when i broke my wrist, as i would of done significantly more damage. simply put, conventional wrist guards will cause alot more damage if you fall going over 6mph/10kmph, as it will break 2 bones for the price of one, in a more painful location.

knee: causes massive amount of discomfort around my knees and i tend to not fall on my knees. wearing the pads actually makes me fall more cos i cant move my knees as freely, and my hips end up VERY sore as a result.

elbow is just pure discomfort.

some skaters like wearing pads, some do not. depending on what sort of skating you are doing, different degree's of padding are of different value.

but think of this, when was the last time an olympic figure skater wore a helmet, wrist guards, knee pads and elbow pads? dont think there has ever been one, and considering a missed landing could easily result in the back of their skull making severe impact on the ground...
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Old January 1st, 2011, 06:28 PM   #44
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...helmet: ive fallen with a helmet and without, and had a much more serious injury from the helmet, which jarred my neck rather seriously for 2 weeks as it gripped heavily on the surface...
The "helmets cause more injury than they prevent" argument always cracks me up. So your neck wouldn't have gotten jarred because your head is naturally slipperier and would have slid more readily than the shiny plastic surface of a typical helmet? ooooh kay...
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Old January 1st, 2011, 06:41 PM   #45
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I know if it wasn't for my cycling helmet, I wouldn't be here today. I was riding home after the 7-11PM session on a well lit street with flashing headlight& taillight when some drunken GI ran a stop sign. my front wheel hit his passenger door and I went over the bars, broke through the window with my helmeted head, head-butted on the side of his head which caused his head to go through the drivers side door glass. I managed to walk away with a few minor cuts , bruises and a mild concussion. he had no clue what had happened and needed 15 stitches. had I not been wearing the helmet, i would look like my mead had been put through a meat grinder. whenever I'm outdoor skating, I always wear my helmet, regular session skating, no. racing yes.
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Old January 1st, 2011, 06:44 PM   #46
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but think of this, when was the last time an olympic figure skater wore a helmet, wrist guards, knee pads and elbow pads? dont think there has ever been one, and considering a missed landing could easily result in the back of their skull making severe impact on the ground...
but you see the ice speed skaters wearing them
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Old January 1st, 2011, 06:45 PM   #47
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Im so used to falling during public sessions always trying to do something new or make what I know smoother that it doesn't even hurt anymore

But for speed practice and races or outdoor skating I will always at least wear a helmet, If it wasn't for the helmet I would of probably had a major injury other than a broken nose during my first big crash after a couple months of starting speed skating
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Old January 1st, 2011, 07:09 PM   #48
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Originally Posted by krisapin View Post
but you see the ice speed skaters wearing them
I was thinking the same thing.

We had a medical professional in our area, an eye doctor, die several years back from an impact sustained to his head when he fell while out fitness skating with no helmet and hit his head on the pavement. If he'd worn a helmet might still be alive....
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Old January 1st, 2011, 07:19 PM   #49
Bill in Houston
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Anyone who takes this post seriously deserves the consequences of doing so. Stupid, stupid stuff.
Quote:
im personally fully aware of risks of not wearing pads and falling, and i refuse to wear them. wrist, knee, elbow or helmet.

helmet: ive fallen with a helmet and without, and had a much more serious injury from the helmet, which jarred my neck rather seriously for 2 weeks as it gripped heavily on the surface. that said, if i was playing hockey, or doing agressive/grinds, i would definately be wearing one, so does very heavily depend on what sort of skating you are doing.

wrist guards: got told by a specialist i was lucky i wasnt wearing one when i broke my wrist, as i would of done significantly more damage. simply put, conventional wrist guards will cause alot more damage if you fall going over 6mph/10kmph, as it will break 2 bones for the price of one, in a more painful location.

knee: causes massive amount of discomfort around my knees and i tend to not fall on my knees. wearing the pads actually makes me fall more cos i cant move my knees as freely, and my hips end up VERY sore as a result.

elbow is just pure discomfort.

some skaters like wearing pads, some do not. depending on what sort of skating you are doing, different degree's of padding are of different value.

but think of this, when was the last time an olympic figure skater wore a helmet, wrist guards, knee pads and elbow pads? dont think there has ever been one, and considering a missed landing could easily result in the back of their skull making severe impact on the ground...
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Old January 1st, 2011, 08:52 PM   #50
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So, I'm biased towards padding: More is better.
I have splinted jaws fully exposed from a tumble down Asphalt Hill, seen knee-caps and bone-ends, splinted a leg that could stick the pinkie toe in their ear, held traction on a hip fracture from a skating fall.

My son broke both bones in his arm with guards on (properly). If they hadn't been there, he would have broken through the growth plate, as it was, a clean closed break Colles that healed well.

Yes, I rock the padding -ALL of it!- at all skate, I'm on quads, have extensive practice in knee-falls, and I can take a safer fall without harming the junior higher who can't seem to skate and text safely. Duh!
I'm sure other parents or kids watching me kit up or skate are wondering, or even flat laughing, but I'm ok with that.
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Old January 1st, 2011, 10:45 PM   #51
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill in Houston View Post
Anyone who takes this post seriously deserves the consequences of doing so. Stupid, stupid stuff.
damn, dawg. See? we're not so far apart?

Happy New Year, William from Houston.
May your feet heal completely and all hindrances
from pure, rejoiceful skating success be removed.
I say this with utmost sincerity.
speedy
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Old January 1st, 2011, 11:13 PM   #52
Bill in Houston
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Quote:
Originally Posted by speedysktr View Post
See? we're not so far apart?
Aww, stop it. We both knew that already. Even if we didn't want to admit it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by speedysktr View Post
Happy New Year, William from Houston.
May your feet heal completely and all hindrances
from pure, rejoiceful skating success be removed.
I say this with utmost sincerity.
speedy
I do appreciate it. I am looking forward to wheels on feet just as much as you can imagine I am. So far, so good.
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Old January 1st, 2011, 11:33 PM   #53
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i never said dont wear pads. im not anti or pro padding. in fact with minors, i will always recommend wearing pads, better safe than sorry. but as an adult, it is purely upto your discretion, there are risks without them for sure, will not argue. yes helmets save lives, knee pads can save knee's very effectively, wont argue them at all.

however, if someone doesnt want to wear pads for a general skate at a rink, then they dont. i don't really care what people say or think about me.

the only pads im very against are wrist guards, ever since the specialist who looked at a broken wrist said if i had been wearing them, i'd of been in more trouble. they are good aslong as u arent moving with much speed. getting sliders would be a much better idea (small glove designed with very low friction palm), as its not trying to absorb, its designed to allow your hands and arms to slide up cleanly from under you. bracing the front and back of something with no where for the force to disipate is just asking for trouble.

my post was purely saying it depends on what your doing as to what pads you wear.
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Old January 2nd, 2011, 12:11 AM   #54
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for all those very intense "must have full pads" people out there. guarantee theres a higher user:death ratio with cars, yet i guarantee you dont have a roll cage, racing suit, full helmet, full racing harness etc. for EVERY person who sits in a car with you. imagine how many lifes would be saved if the laws were to do so?

its no different with skating. you wear protection to suit your abilities and experience, and what you are doing.
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Old January 2nd, 2011, 12:35 AM   #55
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Getting in on this one late...but it is a perpetual discussion that happens in these types of forums. I remember a very long thread on a similar topic on ye olde inline skating newsgroup (rec.sport.skating.inline).

The short answer for my case is that I make a judgment based on the risk I calculate, and session skating for me is not really risky.

I am one of those people who will wear varying degrees of protection depending on the skating I am doing, the environment and the level of risk I therefore judge.

For general rink sessions, I wear nothing (other than clothes and skates). If I am training for or playing hockey, I wear all the prescribed gear and a full cage for my helmet (no padded pants or shoulder chest). If I am at a skate park it is knee, wrist and helmet. City skate is just knee and wrist.

Why? For me it is a personal judgement based on the level of risk associated. I have been skating for over 30 years now and broken my arm once...when I was 5 at my parents rink. Since I have come a long way with skill since then, I see the risk as low that I will injure myself ata rink session. Yes the risk is there, but in my judgement, the chance is very low.

For hockey, there are a lot of factors out of my control, so despite having good skating and hockey skills, I see the need for a significant amount of good padding.

In skating skatepark, my skills are a bit rusty since I don't do it much anymore. Originally I used to only wear wrist guards, but then as I started pushing myself I started to wear knee pads alos. These days I see it as quite risky when I do get out in the skatepark because of my own diminishing skatepark skills, plus there are people heading in all kinds of directions and uncontrolled boards and bikes so I always have a helmet on. I am also considering elbows and maybe even crash pads.

I do find the point on speed skaters at the rink interesting. Helmets are required for training and racing, but these guys will get out in the speed skate at a session where there are things that make it a less safe environment that their training sessions on the rink (like me being in their way) and do it just as fast without a helmet. Would be ironic if one of them ended up with a head injury at a session during the speed skate.

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Old January 2nd, 2011, 12:47 AM   #56
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Originally Posted by inlina View Post
Getting in on this one late...but it is a perpetual discussion that happens in these types of forums. I remember a very long thread on a similar topic on ye olde inline skating newsgroup (rec.sport.skating.inline).

The short answer for my case is that I make a judgment based on the risk I calculate, and session skating for me is not really risky.

I am one of those people who will wear varying degrees of protection depending on the skating I am doing, the environment and the level of risk I therefore judge.

For general rink sessions, I wear nothing (other than clothes and skates). If I am training for or playing hockey, I wear all the prescribed gear and a full cage for my helmet (no padded pants or shoulder chest). If I am at a skate park it is knee, wrist and helmet. City skate is just knee and wrist.

Why? For me it is a personal judgement based on the level of risk associated. I have been skating for over 30 years now and broken my arm once...when I was 5 at my parents rink. Since I have come a long way with skill since then, I see the risk as low that I will injure myself ata rink session. Yes the risk is there, but in my judgement, the chance is very low.

For hockey, there are a lot of factors out of my control, so despite having good skating and hockey skills, I see the need for a significant amount of good padding.

In skating skatepark, my skills are a bit rusty since I don't do it much anymore. Originally I used to only wear wrist guards, but then as I started pushing myself I started to wear knee pads alos. These days I see it as quite risky when I do get out in the skatepark because of my own diminishing skatepark skills, plus there are people heading in all kinds of directions and uncontrolled boards and bikes so I always have a helmet on. I am also considering elbows and maybe even crash pads.

I do find the point on speed skaters at the rink interesting. Helmets are required for training and racing, but these guys will get out in the speed skate at a session where there are things that make it a less safe environment that their training sessions on the rink (like me being in their way) and do it just as fast without a helmet. Would be ironic if one of them ended up with a head injury at a session during the speed skate.

CG
well said
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Old January 2nd, 2011, 01:01 AM   #57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill in Houston View Post
Anyone who takes this post seriously deserves the consequences of doing so. Stupid, stupid stuff.
It's not entirely stupid.

I have heard the story on standard wrist guards being fairly useless at speed elsewhere. I am fairly sure it came up in this forum. Wrist guards that will slide are needed to truly minimise the risk when skating at speed, and most are not designed to do that.

There is an argument in the cycling communities that certain helmet designs can result in neck injuries in acidents wear a head injury probably wouldn't have been sustained. I don't know a lot about it, but it is pushed by the anti-helmet law factions.

Unrelated side note: I watched a doco on Denmark's green cred which noted that they don't mandate helmets in order to encourage cycling. They also minimise the risk buy having dedicated bike lanes and paths for cycle commuters. Their commuting cyclists also are just that, commuters, not maniacal, gung-ho, anti-car, fixie riders that seem to enjoy taking risk (like we have here in inner Melbourne).

Knee pads...my bulky ones do get in the way when I am skating park, but for me I would rather having them on. For others they may cause more issues than they resolve.

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Old January 2nd, 2011, 01:47 AM   #58
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I wear knee pads, and wrist guards now always. (except some club practices, if they are giving me grief about it)

There was a time that I could not say this. I would forget the padding and gaurds in my locker, or forget to put on my knee pads before my skates, and I would say oh well. BUT a few of those times I fell with out the pads, and made my knee clicky, black and blue. I also fell once on my right wrist sans guard, and turned my palm purple and green.

Lesson learned. I DO NOT SKATE A SESSION EVER with out guards.

I realize a helmet would also probably be a good idea. But vainly I cannot bring my self to do that. My coach said he would like to see me skate outside soon, that will get me into a helmet.
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Old January 2nd, 2011, 02:35 PM   #59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnS
but think of this, when was the last time an olympic figure skater wore a helmet, wrist guards, knee pads and elbow pads? dont think there has ever been one, and considering a missed landing could easily result in the back of their skull making severe impact on the ground...
Quote:
Originally Posted by krisapin View Post
but you see the ice speed skaters wearing them
I think this exchange demonstrates my point nicely. Two related skating disciplines: ice figure skating and ice speed racing. One sport requires helmets for comp, one does not. I find it hard to imagine that anyone that has tried both these sports could argue that the likelihood or the severity of head injuries is greater in speed skating than figure skating. Having done indoor and outdoor speed and some inline sports similar to figure skating, I would argue the opposite, that the risk of head trauma is much greater when jumping and spinning than when turning left around a circle.

Yes, wearing a helmet would make both sports much safer, but only one evolved in a way that lead to widespread acceptance of use of headgear.

So, if you acknowledge that life in general would be safer wearing a helmet, then you need either to wear one 24/7 or to make a personal decision what level of danger should require it. Walking downstairs? Driving the car (to be honest, I think this would be a good idea)? Playing basketball? Skating?

I've put that personal threshold of danger somewhere above general skating, but certainly below skydiving or bungee jumping or even riding a motorcycle. Calling me stupid because of it is I think just as silly as if I told you taking a bath without a helmet is stupid.
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Old January 2nd, 2011, 03:13 PM   #60
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Does it really take that long to put on safety gear when time is limited? You'd only really be talking a couple of minutes to put it all on.
I'd estimate the time to don full safety gear is 5 minutes. Well, if I only have 20 minutes to skate, that is 1/4 of all my skating time. And that is disregarding the time required to take it off later.

But it's not only time, it's convenience. If I wanted to skate a little at lunch during work, does that mean I need to lug helmet/kneepads/elbowpads/wristguards on the train in addition to my skates and workbag and laptop and lunch? I'd just not bother.

My point is that to integrate skating more deeply in your life, you probably need to simplify a bit the way you prepare to skate. In my case, that meant reducing equipment I use. That not only means skipping helmet, etc in some cases, but also ancillary stuff like Eezyfits, which I love love love but are really just one more thing to bother with. Same for lycra, which I also adore because it makes my butt look big. Street clothes will have to do. I tried skipping skating socks as well, but found I really needed them to avoid blistering. So they get stuffed inside the boot.

If any of you would like to skate more often, I suggest you try simplifying too. Now that may not mean you skip wristguards or a helmet, but you can probably find plenty of stuff you could do without, at least in some circumstances. Maybe if you didn't stretch before each skate, you would use them for that quick jaunt to the grocery store. Or perhaps that blinky could stay in the skatebag because it's like noon, dude.

Small things like that really will get you out on wheels more, and maybe make skating not just something you do, but also part of who you are.

And Happy New Year y'all.
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