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Beginning Skaters Forum This is the place for beginning skaters to ask questions and share their stories. We would love to hear about your experiences learning to skate. No question is too dumb!

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Old July 10th, 2016, 07:40 PM   #1
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Default Pavement/sidewalks.. :(

I just can't skate on them. Is it me? Is it my wheels? It's really annoying. If it's new level slabs then I'm fine, but the old ones with dips and bumps all over the place I find so difficult and slow me down to almost a walk. I went to a new park today. I struggled and stumbled all the way there and back. At the park I was flying around perfectly but I have no intention to stay in the parks, only using them for practice at the minute. What to do?
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Old July 10th, 2016, 11:49 PM   #2
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I just can't skate on them. Is it me? Is it my wheels? It's really annoying. If it's new level slabs then I'm fine, but the old ones with dips and bumps all over the place I find so difficult and slow me down to almost a walk. I went to a new park today. I struggled and stumbled all the way there and back. At the park I was flying around perfectly but I have no intention to stay in the parks, only using them for practice at the minute. What to do?
Go to the rink and dance your.........uh.....toes into a wild frenzie.
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Old July 11th, 2016, 12:07 AM   #3
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Lol I'm not really one for rink skating. All those people and all those left turns (assuming your going in that direction!) I love the freedom of just going wherever or going where I need to go but on my skates. Or just getting out if I'm bored. I NEED to skate the streets.
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Old July 11th, 2016, 10:28 AM   #4
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It depends how bad the sidewalks are. Bigger wheels definitely help, and softer ones help to an extent. A longer wheelbase or placing the wheels around your center of balance helps. Also, going faster helps.
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Old July 11th, 2016, 12:02 PM   #5
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Thing is, I don't know that a bigger wheels would fit? The wheel nut is right to the end on the wjeels i have kn now. I wonder if thats because theyre not hubbed? Would that make a difference? Everywhere else absolutely fine with these wheels. Going faster I did wonder about but I find it so much effort. I wonder if it's a matter of building up strength also. I'm only Little and its hard lol.
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Old July 11th, 2016, 12:28 PM   #6
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Tried to insert an image of my wheel nuts but getting nowhere lol
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Old August 26th, 2016, 06:00 PM   #7
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Lol I'm not really one for rink skating. All those people and all those left turns (assuming your going in that direction!) I love the freedom of just going wherever or going where I need to go but on my skates. Or just getting out if I'm bored. I NEED to skate the streets.
Enjoy your street skating. I would not dare practice during an open session at a rink. There are too many distractions. There is an Olympic rink size room with wooden floor in a near by university that I use on the weekends. For outdoor skating, the only nice smooth and level surface available is a basketball court and a tennis court. I use them early in the morning or late at night when it is not occupied.

Glad to read your wheel issue was resolved. I use thin spacers to prevent the truck from pressing against the bearings. I also use them to prevent the nut or the nut socket from pressing against the bearing shield. Something, the spacer may come with the lock nut. The spacers I use are also designed to work with a bearing that does not have a shield.


(Click on thumbnail for full size image)
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Old August 26th, 2016, 07:42 PM   #8
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You can also go with 100% nylon axle nuts that start to grip after less threads engage and can still have more threads gripping even though they may protrude a bit beyond the ends of axles. However, I have only seen them offered in the 8mm axle thread size.

I make my own in both the 7mm & the 8mm sizes, and I love them.

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Old August 28th, 2016, 02:16 PM   #9
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You can also go with 100% nylon axle nuts that start to grip after less threads engage and can still have more threads gripping even though they may protrude a bit beyond the ends of axles. However, I have only seen them offered in the 8mm axle thread size.

I make my own in both the 7mm & the 8mm sizes, and I love them.

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Old August 28th, 2016, 02:15 PM   #10
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Enjoy your street skating. I would not dare practice during an open session at a rink. There are too many distractions. There is an Olympic rink size room with wooden floor in a near by university that I use on the weekends. For outdoor skating, the only nice smooth and level surface available is a basketball court and a tennis court. I use them early in the morning or late at night when it is not occupied.

Glad to read your wheel issue was resolved. I use thin spacers to prevent the truck from pressing against the bearings. I also use them to prevent the nut or the nut socket from pressing against the bearing shield. Something, the spacer may come with the lock nut. The spacers I use are also designed to work with a bearing that does not have a shield.


(Click on thumbnail for full size image)
Thanks Gee. I have never seen those things before. The washer and nut yes but that other thing. Where on the wheel does it sit?
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Old August 30th, 2016, 04:53 PM   #11
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Thanks Gee. I have never seen those things before. The washer and nut yes but that other thing. Where on the wheel does it sit?
The image I post before has Atlas dust caps, lock nut and dust cap with an integrated lock nut. I like to use the Atlas dust cover on the side of the wheel toward the end of the axle and I like to use the Rannalli dust caps on the side of the wheel against the truck. The Rannalli dust caps made of thick steel, they work well as a dust cap with integrated thin spacer. Dust caps were popular before bearings were made with circlip and removable cap. I still prefer using dust caps to removing and setting a circlip.

Rannalli rear dust cap

(Click on thumbnail for full size image)

Atlas plates with Atlas and Rannalli dust caps

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Old August 17th, 2016, 01:58 PM   #12
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I just can't skate on them. Is it me? Is it my wheels? It's really annoying. If it's new level slabs then I'm fine, but the old ones with dips and bumps all over the place I find so difficult and slow me down to almost a walk. I went to a new park today. I struggled and stumbled all the way there and back. At the park I was flying around perfectly but I have no intention to stay in the parks, only using them for practice at the minute. What to do?
There are some things you can do to change the condition.

Since you have mentioned you can fly all around the places of the skate park, I should probable rule out one thing, but just to be complete, I will still ask that ""What is the condition of your bearing? What speed grade is it?"

The next question is "What is the size of your wheel?" If you can play in skate park and doing tricks without a problem, you are probably using too small wheels for the road. Aggressive skates use only wheels smaller than 60 mm for the reason of doing tricks. Those wheels are not for the road, design and size. I played aggressive skate in the past, so I know it.

The third question is "What is the hardness of the wheels?" Though it is not really doing much, but in fact, softer wheels gives better grip but slower speed. Vice versa, harder wheels give better speed but regular to not so well grip. Well, of course, the brand name of the wheels also have something to do with the science..... though it may not be that much....

The fourth question to ask is the chassis. If your skate is free style type, your chassis should be adjustable. That means you may adjust the chassis to see if certain angle is better for your stroke. Everyone walks differently in gait, so does the stroke when skating. You can adjust the position of the chassis for better performance for yourself.

The fifth question, do you fasten your skate snug, tight, or loss? To skate properly, a lose fit condition is a "no good." In aggressive skate, people want to look cool, so they normally only do slightly right fit or a little bit loss fit, so they have room for tricks. But for regular skate, you want a proper fit or snug fit for better power transfer.


Above are the things I will check if I have your issue. All the questions I list are my personal experiences for years of playing inline skates. I am not as good as I used to be, but I'm still in love with in line skates.

Let me know if you need more details. I will try to explain.
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Old August 17th, 2016, 04:42 PM   #13
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There are some things you can do to change the condition.

Since you have mentioned you can fly all around the places of the skate park, I should probable rule out one thing, but just to be complete, I will still ask that ""What is the condition of your bearing? What speed grade is it?"

The next question is "What is the size of your wheel?" If you can play in skate park and doing tricks without a problem, you are probably using too small wheels for the road. Aggressive skates use only wheels smaller than 60 mm for the reason of doing tricks. Those wheels are not for the road, design and size. I played aggressive skate in the past, so I know it.

The third question is "What is the hardness of the wheels?" Though it is not really doing much, but in fact, softer wheels gives better grip but slower speed. Vice versa, harder wheels give better speed but regular to not so well grip. Well, of course, the brand name of the wheels also have something to do with the science..... though it may not be that much....

The fourth question to ask is the chassis. If your skate is free style type, your chassis should be adjustable. That means you may adjust the chassis to see if certain angle is better for your stroke. Everyone walks differently in gait, so does the stroke when skating. You can adjust the position of the chassis for better performance for yourself.

The fifth question, do you fasten your skate snug, tight, or loss? To skate properly, a lose fit condition is a "no good." In aggressive skate, people want to look cool, so they normally only do slightly right fit or a little bit loss fit, so they have room for tricks. But for regular skate, you want a proper fit or snug fit for better power transfer.


Above are the things I will check if I have your issue. All the questions I list are my personal experiences for years of playing inline skates. I am not as good as I used to be, but I'm still in love with in line skates.

Let me know if you need more details. I will try to explain.
Hi Everest. And thank you. OK. ..if I skate park I'm sorry I meant that I skate in the park. Just a normal park with a smooth tarmac type surface path around it and skate fine on that. Have no where reached the trick stage yet. I've since been skating on different skates. Some sfr cosmic. Which for a cheap skate if found to be the most comfy and controllable. But still an issue with pavement to a degree. The bearings in those are stock abec 7 I believe and in good cindition and I have 65mm 78A airwave wheels.
When you say chassis? I'm not sure what that is on the skate. The plate?
Yes I wear them snug and tight. Though I only go up to one before last hole as it's more comfy fir me that way.
I've actually since bought some krypto route 65 but when I put them into the sfr they kinda jam on the axle, don't slip up and down well. I thought the bearing maybe wernt flush but they are. And when I put them on my other skates they're fine. Trouble is they are rookie ruckus and I've realised that flat heeled skates are not for me. I don't understand why the wheel won't sit right on the sfr.
I also have a pair of suregrip fame a few days ago and am finding them harder to control than the sfr. Could that be due to the nylon rock plate? I'm only small so surly not a weight thing
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Old August 17th, 2016, 05:42 PM   #14
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Chassis (or more commonly in my experience, frame) is an inline term. You could call it the equivalent of a plate in some regards, but adjusting a plate requires redrilling holes in the bottom of your boot. The stock mounting should be good enough for you.

I'll also point out that harder wheels are not necessarily faster outdoors. If the surface is perfectly smooth harder wheels are almost always faster, but if there are bumps it's actually advantageous to have a wheel that deforms rather than popping you up in the air (even just slightly), since when you land you actually absorb some energy.

ABEC ratings don't mean anything anymore, and it was always just a machining term. It used to be that the companies which could afford to manufacture higher ABEC rating bearings also had better materials and design. Now Chinese manufacturing is so cheap there are much better indicators of bearing quality.
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Old August 17th, 2016, 11:38 PM   #15
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Chassis (or more commonly in my experience, frame) is an inline term. You could call it the equivalent of a plate in some regards, but adjusting a plate requires redrilling holes in the bottom of your boot. The stock mounting should be good enough for you.

I'll also point out that harder wheels are not necessarily faster outdoors. If the surface is perfectly smooth harder wheels are almost always faster, but if there are bumps it's actually advantageous to have a wheel that deforms rather than popping you up in the air (even just slightly), since when you land you actually absorb some energy.

ABEC ratings don't mean anything anymore, and it was always just a machining term. It used to be that the companies which could afford to manufacture higher ABEC rating bearings also had better materials and design. Now Chinese manufacturing is so cheap there are much better indicators of bearing quality.
Right, got cha. Thanks. Yeah I'm getting to learn this about the bearings. It's frustrating though. Thinking is it me, is it the skates lol. Joke is of all the skates I've bought the cheap sfr I skate best with though I find them a little heavy. The suregrip fame I bought the other day almost seem to have a mind of their own. Not as easy to site on as the sfr though they are lighter. It's all a bloody nightmare lol. Always something
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