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Beginning Skaters Forum This is the place for beginning skaters to ask questions and share their stories. We would love to hear about your experiences learning to skate. No question is too dumb!

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Old October 27th, 2015, 04:48 AM   #1
Rooboy
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Default Tips for hockey stop

Apologies if this has been covered, I couldn't find it.
I am back into in-line skating after a few years off. I now realise how rubbish at it I was before.
For context, I can do crossover step, I'm OK with T-stop both feet and can do a spin? stop mostly (feet face opposite directions) but I can't get a hockey stop. I have youtubed 'til it hurts but my right skate won't "slide" out. It just grips and I turn 90deg left or I stack!

Any tips on positioning my weight or upper body or wheel hardness that I should consider?
Thanks in advance.
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Old October 27th, 2015, 09:09 AM   #2
Mort
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First steps is learning to plow stop. Once you can do that you can learn to hockey stop as the lateral kick motion with jutting out the heels is very similar.

When I started learning hockey stops i only used say the right outside foot to slide when turning hard to the left for a hockey stop. The other foot just glided in the direction of the stop, heel first. Kinda looked like an outstretched T stop.

Slippery wheels make this a lot easier to learn. Grippy wheels increase the strength and skill required, but alson drastically decrease stopping distance.
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Old October 27th, 2015, 10:54 AM   #3
WJCIV
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What surface are you skating?

What wheel hardness and what profile (hockey, urban, speed) is it?
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Old October 28th, 2015, 05:40 AM   #4
Rooboy
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Thanks for the replies.
I'll try and drill the plow stop. When I've tried them in the past they were hard work on the adductors and knees, and again, wheels gripped very hard.

I skate on tarmac/bitumen/asphalt (depending where you grew up) and sometimes concrete and also (sadly) on pavers which are all too prevalent in my area and remind me of every filling in my teeth! I don't often do drills on pavers though.

My wheels came with my Crazy Skates. They seem to be their generic wheel and described as “80mm Urethane” and just have the number 8 on the actual wheel. This doesn’t seem to fit with the 0-100 durometer rating …unless they are REALLY soft.
I think the profile is ‘recreational’ which I guess = urban?

I actually did some research and discovered: 1. Apparently you need harder wheels when you are heavier (I’m 97kg) 2. All skates and accessories are VERY expensive in Australia and expensive to ship from the US!! Now I know I’m going to skate more it’s almost worth me buying new skates to get better wheels.
Thanks again.
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Old October 28th, 2015, 10:24 AM   #5
WJCIV
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rooboy View Post
I think the profile is ‘recreational’ which I guess = urban?
Probably fitness, which is closer to or exactly the speed wheel profile. If your goal is to do tricks and moves you might be better off with an aggressive or hockey wheel. If this is a minor point of your skating and you just want to put in miles stick with the rec wheels.

I should probably explain what I mean by profile. If you look at the wheels straight on you can see that different wheels have rounder or flatter shapes. As an example look at the second pic for a speed wheel, a pure aggressive wheel, and a slightly less aggressive wheel. Note that I am not recommending any of these. They're just typical examples of profile. The flatter profile makes it easier to stay upright while doing certain moves.

There's no way the wheel is 8A. I don't know too much about the scale that low, but I would think that would be a consistency close to warm butter, so just standing on them would reduce them to mush. More likely that is a brand or model. I'm not familiar with it.
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Old October 28th, 2015, 11:40 AM   #6
Mort
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8A would be about the firmness of a padded sock. Possibly a bad printing.

Its likely an 80A wheel and 80mm. A easier to slide wheel would be Urban/outdoor hockey wheels. Around the 85 to 87A mark. Theres a lot of Slalom discipline slides out there. Shaw would be the user on here to ask about slides. Hes all about them, and would know what wheels are out there that would be best to learn on or have a good middle ground.

Try posting in the slalom cone skating forum.
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Old October 28th, 2015, 06:40 PM   #7
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Default Morts Reply 01 plus more

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rooboy View Post
Apologies if this has been covered, I couldn't find it.
I am back into in-line skating after a few years off. I now realise how rubbish at it I was before.
For context, I can do crossover step, I'm OK with T-stop both feet and can do a spin? stop mostly (feet face opposite directions) but I can't get a hockey stop. I have youtubed 'til it hurts but my right skate won't "slide" out. It just grips and I turn 90deg left or I stack!

Any tips on positioning my weight or upper body or wheel hardness that I should consider?
Thanks in advance.
Mort, to me, in his first note back got most of the how to...
Now you can still do it on other wheels yet unless you are a natural the learning is lots harder. BTW we have had this wheel hardnesses tread vs floor repeated tons of times.

Geez I thought Hockey stops on InLines was easy easy compared to Quads with it's narrow width.

WJCIV asks a good question. The Surface does matter to how advice is given. It could be wet, it could be a dirty surface inside, in could be outside on payment, it could be?? The Advice changes depending on the surface.
Currently I skate mostly InDoors, yet that is not all I have skated.

Yours in Skating, MA NY Skating Dave
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Old October 28th, 2015, 11:12 PM   #8
Mort
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Hockey stops for inlines are harder than quads. Quads have a wuder footprint and are far more stable. Inlines have a lot of grip, and can slide out easily under some conditions. With the narrow footprint and tilting an inline can do it can easliy flip out from under you.
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Old October 30th, 2015, 03:12 PM   #9
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Default Well Interesting Mort Different Strokes for . . .

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mort View Post
Hockey stops for inlines are harder than quads. Quads have a wuder footprint and are far more stable. Inlines have a lot of grip, and can slide out easily under some conditions. With the narrow footprint and tilting an inline can do it can easliy flip out from under you.
Interesting comment. To be fair most of the InLiners I see lately, like the Power Slide, and for awhile like months they were playing with it across the floor; although, they could easily do a hockey stop. Now we have Ice Hockey players up here and sometimes come inside using Hockey InLine skates, some not all. Even met more of them with Hockey InLines in Indiana when I skated there. They skated street hockey.

Anyway it looks like your situation and skaters and wheels and surfaces are different. If you change your wheels and get off the 110s or 90s, I think you skate on, you probably could do them easily.

On Quads we have a range of Artistic Skaters that don't feel comfortable with the Hockey Stop for a variety of reasons. (Including Flat Spots). For Derby on Quads I was watching a trainer do them backwards prior to being the Practice Leader. He had some pretty neat early drills for the Gals team.

Yours in Skating, MA/NY Skating Dave
P.S. Just remember I skated with an InLiner years ago who did Forward flips across the Rink at the Close of every session. New York State Windsor.

BTW, Never learned whether you got Side Surfing down on your InLines. One young man maybe 15 or so finally was doing it last week, yet it was kind of funny how he did it, more angled position then most good InLiners. Yet he still was doing Side Surfing even if a bit odder than most. Some of the young gals are trying it on their InLines, yet the other really good young guys, about their age tried awhile ago and kind of lost interest. Now they like the up on your toes cones, racing and dodging and girls
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Last edited by MANY_SkatingDave; October 30th, 2015 at 03:18 PM. Reason: Side Surfing BTW / Bones Turbo Wheels
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Old October 31st, 2015, 03:48 AM   #10
Mort
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I still can't side surf for crap. Still limited on flexibility, but its getting better, i dont remember to stretch enough, thats my problem. I can hold a straight line but lack enoufh flexibility to pump speed.

I dont skate on 90/100/110 wheels, I use rec skates that typically have 72 to 80mm wheels in them.

A power slide and a hockey stop are pretty much the same thing, with the exception tjat most people calling it a power slide are only sliding 1 foot and using the other to roll. Kind of like a T stop in reverse.

Flat spotting wheels is a personal problem not so much a wheel hardness. If your angle of attack during the stop is too perpendicular its gonna cause the wheels to slow up and possibly stop rotating during the slide, thats what flat spots wheels. I have flat spotted wheels before, it was totally my fault. My angle of attack was perpendicular to my line of travel, wheels slid, cause flat spots, had to machine them.
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Old November 3rd, 2015, 12:20 PM   #11
Derrick
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mort View Post
I still can't side surf for crap. Still limited on flexibility, but its getting better, i dont remember to stretch enough, thats my problem. I can hold a straight line but lack enoufh flexibility to pump speed.
Try shifting you weight foot-to-foot while coasting spread eagle. Put your feet well appart and keep your knees bent. Don't worry about pumping. The pump will just happen as you learn to shift weight. At least that's what worked for me.
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Old November 3rd, 2015, 02:04 PM   #12
Mort
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Try shifting you weight foot-to-foot while coasting spread eagle. Put your feet well appart and keep your knees bent. Don't worry about pumping. The pump will just happen as you learn to shift weight. At least that's what worked for me.
I know how lol, i taught my daughter to do it, I cant point my toes very far away from each other. Maybe 120 deg before limitations of flexibility are apparent? For my skill level, its quite pathetic. Lol

I can go up on the front axle on one foot an slalom on 2 wheels around the rink, but cant side surf. MUST... STRETCH....
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Old November 3rd, 2015, 04:02 PM   #13
Fancy-Kerrigan
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Well Rooboy you actually live in the country of a fantastic custom quad wheel guy. Check him out at www.coreyskates.com
So if wheels are your issue, he is your solution.

On the topic of side surfing I have this to offer:
I love side surfing
I can not hold this position in shoes.
Side surfing is made more difficult by a stiff suspension
In fact side surfing is how I dial in my trucks. When it's easy to surf, the suspension is perfect.
Side surfing is easier to do going down hill (coolness factor 100)

On the topic of hockey stops:
One of my least used ways of stopping.
I prefer the tomahawk stop (because flat spotted wheels are bad)
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Old November 4th, 2015, 02:43 AM   #14
Mort
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Quote:
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Well Rooboy you actually live in the country of a fantastic custom quad wheel guy. Check him out at www.coreyskates.com
So if wheels are your issue, he is your solution.

I think hes on inlines, unless Scott is doing them now :P
On the topic of side surfing I have this to offer:
I love side surfing
I can not hold this position in shoes.
Side surfing is made more difficult by a stiff suspension
In fact side surfing is how I dial in my trucks. When it's easy to surf, the suspension is perfect.
Side surfing is easier to do going down hill (coolness factor 100)

I have to cheat with the action already, lol my feet can get about 120 deg before its forced. Just need to keep remembering to stretch, I was a bit pigeon toed as a kid.


On the topic of hockey stops:
One of my least used ways of stopping.
I prefer the tomahawk stop (because flat spotted wheels are bad)
I trained myself to not need toestops, so no matter if Im on blade or quads im ready. If that makes sense. I flat spotted a couple wheels learning to get my backwards hockey stops right.
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Old November 9th, 2015, 02:17 AM   #15
Rooboy
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Thanks all.
Scott politely informed me he doesn't do in-line wheels etc, Fancy-Kerrigan but thanks.
I've been drilling plow stop and getting the turn tighter and tighter.
I have harder wheels on order (...waiting, waiting...) and going to try a rocker setup.
I also found a Canadian guy at my office who plays in-line hockey so I'm going to bend his ear and get him to teach me (if he's willing). He's already told me a good place to buy wheels etc.

Thanks again!
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Old November 9th, 2015, 03:49 PM   #16
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Sorry my bad. I thought you were a quad guy.
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