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Beginning Skaters Forum This is the place for beginning skaters to ask questions and share their stories. We would love to hear about your experiences learning to skate. No question is too dumb!

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Old September 2nd, 2016, 07:34 PM   #1
FrizzleFry
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Default I need to come up with a learning plan

Hello, I am looking for a lesson plan that instructors may use for people learning inline skating. I cannot find a single place that I can take lessons from so I'm never sure off how to spend my time effectively. I honestly have never seen anyone skating in my city at all.

So far I have been trying to increase my one legged balance, make sharp turn radii, and stop with control. My T stop is getting better and my hockey stop is a lot better than it used to be. I have just been bouncing around on forums and YouTube videos without any idea of whether it is really time to work on that specific skill.

If anyone has any recommendations or ideas I would appreciate hearing it. Again, the idea is to make increase skill in the lowest amount of time. I hope to do freeride in the city to play around and do long distance to keep up my fitness.
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Old September 3rd, 2016, 08:40 AM   #2
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Watch ice hockey skate videos, slalom inline skaters too.
Many slalom skste clips will show breakdowns of moves in slower motions. This will develop edging very quickly.

Never forget that you can only push laterally on skates.

Inlines turn like bikes/motorcycles, they lean.

Check out eddy matzger, learning slalom skills will jelp you learn to double push.

Where are you at in this world?
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Old September 3rd, 2016, 12:54 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by Mort View Post
Watch ice hockey skate videos, slalom inline skaters too.
Many slalom skste clips will show breakdowns of moves in slower motions. This will develop edging very quickly.

Never forget that you can only push laterally on skates.

Inlines turn like bikes/motorcycles, they lean.

Check out eddy matzger, learning slalom skills will jelp you learn to double push.

Where are you at in this world?
Thanks for the reply.
I live in Cincinnati Ohio USA
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Old September 3rd, 2016, 05:57 PM   #4
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I think you have an ice rink called Learn to Skate Cincinnati. You can try learn all the basics there and determine what you need to master. The important thing in skating is that you need to master the basics of balance and edge control before advancing to more complicated moves.

Skating on one leg will come naturally when you have developed solid edges. I think constant practicing of scissors and doing the basic slalom (i.e. two feet slalom, scissors slalom then eventually criss-cross slalom) is the best way to develop, maintain and improve your control of the skates. Master the basics and soon you will be able to perform a one foot wiggle on either foot going forward or backward for as long as you wish.

There are many skaters who want to go forward and fast and do not bother with the scissors or basic slalom. They will manage to move quickly with lots of errors. Small errors in balance or edging will create technical issues that will prevent the proper execution of more advanced moves and you will eventually lose time to relearning the basics in order to succeed with the advanced moves.
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Old September 3rd, 2016, 06:03 PM   #5
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You have an ice rink called Learn to Skate Cincinnati. You can try learn all the basics there and determine what you need to master. The important thing in skating is that you need to master the basics of balance and edge control before advancing to more complicated moves.

Skating on one leg will become naturally when you have developed solid edges. I think constant practicing of scissors and doing the basic slalom (i.e. two feet slalom, scissors slalom then eventually criss-cross slalom) is the best way to develop, maintain and improve your control of the skates. Master the basics and soon you will be able to perform a one foot wiggle on ether foot going forward or backward for as long as you wish.

There are many skaters who want to go forward and fast and do not bother with the scissors or basic slalom. They will manage to move quickly with lots of errors. Small errors in balance or edging will create technical issues that will prevent the proper execution of more advanced moves and you will eventually lose time to relearning the basics in order to succeed with the advanced moves.
Will ice skating be close enough to inline skating? I never really thought of going to an ice skating rink yet.

As for slalom, do you have a video you recommend or do you think looking the term up in YouTube will be good enough to find someone who knows what they are actually doing. I feel like a lot of the YouTube teachers don't quite teach you that well and it's hard to tell when you don't know any better.
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Old September 3rd, 2016, 06:05 PM   #6
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Here is a video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u7fP0bXt5wo
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Old September 3rd, 2016, 06:09 PM   #7
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Ah I see. I guess it is a lot less complicated than I thought.
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Old September 3rd, 2016, 06:47 PM   #8
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We go up to Cincinnati once in a while. Next time im up that way, we could all meet up and skate.

I take the kids to Castle up there.
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Old September 3rd, 2016, 06:56 PM   #9
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Ah I see. I guess it is a lot less complicated than I thought.
They are simple and many people overlook them. I believe you are never too advanced to work on the basics.
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Old September 3rd, 2016, 08:25 PM   #10
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Hi! I'm a fellow beginner, sort of in the same situation. I thought I'd offer my two cents. During my workout, I wear a stop watch and time all my drills to maximize my training. I also, don't listen to music... I found I'm more focused on my movements without music ... Hopefully this will be helpful in setting up your practice schedule

First 5 min -> Fun ride! This is where I just stretch out and get my feet comfortable in my skates. Usually I tighten my laces afterward.

10 Minutes
Go In-line/ One Legged. MAKE SURE YOU DO BOTH LEGS!
https://youtu.be/L8Gs_eyIPFA?t=1m31s

20 Minutes
T-stop Drill
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UORe85LDgOk
^
I don't do this anymore just FYI. Since, I'm comfortable doing both legs. Make sure you can do both!

Now I do either Bill Stoppard's Power Stop Drill
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fkyrqJ7XJjc

Or

Asha's Scissors/ Decelerating Downhill
Can't seem to find the video anymore... but it's when you're going down hill you scissor to slow then parallel stop.

20 Minutes: Front Crossover

Initially started with... crossover exercises on grass, then concrete. You don't really need cones, just find a spot on the ground where there is a straight line.
https://youtu.be/T1S10YTKRdQ?t=1m24s

Currently, I just go around in circles, both directions.
https://youtu.be/ZP628hZN7Ts?t=30s

5 Minutes: Cool down
Ride around having fun.

What I found to be really helpful is documenting with your cell phone or video camera and comparing it to the youtube videos, this ensures that you're not practicing the incorrect form.

Also, it's not always as rigid as above. Sometimes if I have a lot of extra time, I do one hour of drills and then just free skate with music. Skating shouldn't feel like doing homework anyways.

Make sure you pick drills and exercises that match your skill level.
And most importantly have fun!
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Old September 3rd, 2016, 10:19 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Gee View Post
They are simple and many people overlook them. I believe you are never too advanced to work on the basics.
Thanks. I will definitely be doing slalom if it will help me stop rolling like a baby giraffe. I already have the solo cups to use as cones.
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Old September 4th, 2016, 04:09 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by whyandielee View Post
Hi! I'm a fellow beginner, sort of in the same situation. I thought I'd offer my two cents. During my workout, I wear a stop watch and time all my drills to maximize my training. I also, don't listen to music... I found I'm more focused on my movements without music ... Hopefully this will be helpful in setting up your practice schedule

First 5 min -> Fun ride! This is where I just stretch out and get my feet comfortable in my skates. Usually I tighten my laces afterward.

10 Minutes
Go In-line/ One Legged. MAKE SURE YOU DO BOTH LEGS!
https://youtu.be/L8Gs_eyIPFA?t=1m31s

20 Minutes
T-stop Drill
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UORe85LDgOk
^
I don't do this anymore just FYI. Since, I'm comfortable doing both legs. Make sure you can do both!

Now I do either Bill Stoppard's Power Stop Drill
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fkyrqJ7XJjc

Or

Asha's Scissors/ Decelerating Downhill
Can't seem to find the video anymore... but it's when you're going down hill you scissor to slow then parallel stop.

20 Minutes: Front Crossover

Initially started with... crossover exercises on grass, then concrete. You don't really need cones, just find a spot on the ground where there is a straight line.
https://youtu.be/T1S10YTKRdQ?t=1m24s

Currently, I just go around in circles, both directions.
https://youtu.be/ZP628hZN7Ts?t=30s

5 Minutes: Cool down
Ride around having fun.

What I found to be really helpful is documenting with your cell phone or video camera and comparing it to the youtube videos, this ensures that you're not practicing the incorrect form.

Also, it's not always as rigid as above. Sometimes if I have a lot of extra time, I do one hour of drills and then just free skate with music. Skating shouldn't feel like doing homework anyways.

Make sure you pick drills and exercises that match your skill level.
And most importantly have fun!
You definitely have looked into this. Could you please elaborate on the downhill section? I could be skating around town by now if it was not for some of the hills. How did you learn control?
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Old September 4th, 2016, 07:58 PM   #13
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You definitely have looked into this. Could you please elaborate on the downhill section? I could be skating around town by now if it was not for some of the hills. How did you learn control?
Hm... I'm not sure how to best explain it The closest I can find on youtube is this video of this guy practicing (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kXpiMhEJLHs). What I do is I just add parallel stop after I scissor to decelerate. There is also something called slalom stopping for down hill. Check link here at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ci0rTb-wvsI

Be careful going downhill! I'm still terrified and tend to go slow or stop and then go multiple times. Or jump on grass when you're going down like Bill does here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oiNdQfya030.

Good luck! let me know how it goes!
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Old September 4th, 2016, 08:40 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by Mort View Post
We go up to Cincinnati once in a while. Next time im up that way, we could all meet up and skate.

I take the kids to Castle up there.
I have not been to a skating rink since I was a kid. What do you guys do there?
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Old September 4th, 2016, 10:49 PM   #15
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Default Circle crossover drills are your best learning friend

Here is my 2 cents (well, maybe 20 cents):

The hockey skating VID doing circles is not how a beginner starts out.
The size of the circle should be two or three times bigger than that.

The foundation that needs to be build up first, when learning to skate, is becoming confident that, when you are rolling with only one skate down, you have good enough steering control to maintain balance while you steer the skate through a carving arc line, regardless of whether the single down skate is doing a push stroke, or just free rolling along a curving line.

So learning to confidently control the lean of the single down skate, so that takes you along a desired curving arc line, is your main goal.

For this to work, the single rolling down skate must be maintained at BOTH the proper lateral location (left/right) underneath focus of weight of your body, AND it must also have the the correct amount of skate lean to match the desired curve of the carve arc line.

This skill develops as you learn how to balance well enough to maintain control of the focus of your weight coming down onto the single rolling skate, and how to steer that down skate laterally, below your body weight, so that as the skate moves to the left/right, it tips your body/leg/skate to the needed lean angle that will determine the intended curve path you need to follow.

Skating straight lines, coasting with just one skate down is pretty much a waste of practice time. Skating (not coasting) is a 90+% of the time carving/curving skates activity, not a rolling straight lines activity, unless you're coasting down a long hill.

Too many skaters have weak push strokes (once they are rolling) because they do not understand how the leg push needs to be directed at 90 outward (NOT REARWARD) -AND- the skate should stay pointed parallel to the line of travel NOT angled outward away from the line of travel, This ensures that the the skate can properly track along a carving an arc line as it rolls through the push.

When you skate circles, it requires constant attention to this process of learning to maintain your balance while controlling your direction of travel along a curving path, by shifting (steering) the lateral position of the single down skate's path relative to lateral position of the body's downward focus of weight.

The more the skate carves away from being directly underneath the weight coming down from above it, the more it (and the body) leans, and starts to track a curved arc line path.

By spending literally hours and hours skating circles while doing crossovers, you will become progressively better and better at mastering this skill. You start out doing larger circles and work your way down to tighter ones as you improve. IMO, for beginners, no other drill allows for as much skating skill improvement in a short time as doing circle crossover drills does.

Once you learn the basics, mix it up and start doing them in SLOW MOTION, where you stay on ONLY the one down skate for 2-3X longer before you land the other skate, As you improve, when you do land the crossed leg skate, keep both skates down at once in the crossed position, and split weight between both skates at once, steering them in tandem on the circular path.

This teaches you to learn to point the skate properly as it lands and to twist-steer each skate in sync relationship to the other down skate

Even veteran elite speed skaters continue to spend a lot of time doing circle crossovers drills to stay sharp with their foot placements below their body weight, as they land their up foot skate precisely and sync its pointing direction to the curving arc line that the other skate was tracking along.

-Armadillo
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Old September 5th, 2016, 03:33 AM   #16
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I have not been to a skating rink since I was a kid. What do you guys do there?
We do everything. Inlines, quads, ice, what ever we happen to choose. Though I havent been on my inlines for a couple months now.

Most of the skating that we do is fast, very fast. We shuffle around, dodge in and out/ around people, sometimes get get a lil crazy. Never hit anyone tho.

Rinks are a good place to watch alot of other skaters, mimic them, and find out how to move on a real life experience. Way better than videos if theres good people to skate with.

Im going to an event this month so we may be up there in october sometime.
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Old September 5th, 2016, 04:12 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by Armadillo View Post
Here is my 2 cents (well, maybe 20 cents):

The hockey skating VID doing circles is not how a beginner starts out.
The size of the circle should be two or three times bigger than that.

The foundation that needs to be build up first, when learning to skate, is becoming confident that, when you are rolling with only one skate down, you have good enough steering control to maintain balance while you steer the skate through a carving arc line, regardless of whether the single down skate is doing a push stroke, or just free rolling along a curving line.

So learning to confidently control the lean of the single down skate, so that takes you along a desired curving arc line, is your main goal.

For this to work, the single rolling down skate must be maintained at BOTH the proper lateral location (left/right) underneath focus of weight of your body, AND it must also have the the correct amount of skate lean to match the desired curve of the carve arc line.

This skill develops as you learn how to balance well enough to maintain control of the focus of your weight coming down onto the single rolling skate, and how to steer that down skate laterally, below your body weight, so that as the skate moves to the left/right, it tips your body/leg/skate to the needed lean angle that will determine the intended curve path you need to follow.

Skating straight lines, coasting with just one skate down is pretty much a waste of practice time. Skating (not coasting) is a 90+% of the time carving/curving skates activity, not a rolling straight lines activity, unless you're coasting down a long hill.

Too many skaters have weak push strokes (once they are rolling) because they do not understand how the leg push needs to be directed at 90 outward (NOT REARWARD) -AND- the skate should stay pointed parallel to the line of travel NOT angled outward away from the line of travel, This ensures that the the skate can properly track along a carving an arc line as it rolls through the push.

When you skate circles, it requires constant attention to this process of learning to maintain your balance while controlling your direction of travel along a curving path, by shifting (steering) the lateral position of the single down skate's path relative to lateral position of the body's downward focus of weight.

The more the skate carves away from being directly underneath the weight coming down from above it, the more it (and the body) leans, and starts to track a curved arc line path.

By spending literally hours and hours skating circles while doing crossovers, you will become progressively better and better at mastering this skill. You start out doing larger circles and work your way down to tighter ones as you improve. IMO, for beginners, no other drill allows for as much skating skill improvement in a short time as doing circle crossover drills does.

Once you learn the basics, mix it up and start doing them in SLOW MOTION, where you stay on ONLY the one down skate for 2-3X longer before you land the other skate, As you improve, when you do land the crossed leg skate, keep both skates down at once in the crossed position, and split weight between both skates at once, steering them in tandem on the circular path.

This teaches you to learn to point the skate properly as it lands and to twist-steer each skate in sync relationship to the other down skate

Even veteran elite speed skaters continue to spend a lot of time doing circle crossovers drills to stay sharp with their foot placements below their body weight, as they land their up foot skate precisely and sync its pointing direction to the curving arc line that the other skate was tracking along.

-Armadillo
This is a lot of information. Thank you for taking the time to explain this. I'm having trouble understand the part about pushing your feet outward and not pushing back. I wish that I could see it in action so that I could follow what you are saying better.

The crossover circles sound like a good thing to add to my practice though. I will see how many I can do before my head is spinning, though I have not done crossovers at all yet. Thanks again for sharing your detailed experience with me. I get excited thinking about trying it the things I'm told will make me better.
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Old September 5th, 2016, 04:49 AM   #18
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Skating straight lines, coasting with just one skate down is pretty much a waste of practice time. This depends on if the skater needs the practice or not. One skate rolling straight for extended periods of times leads to a skater being comfortable in attempting 1 foot slaloms to maintain speed, build speed, or even shed speed. All without using the other leg the entire time. Skating (not coasting) is a 90+% of the time carving/curving skates activity, not a rolling straight lines activity, unless you're coasting down a long hill.

Too many skaters have weak push strokes (once they are rolling) because they do not understand how the leg push needs to be directed at 90 outward (NOT REARWARD) -AND- the skate should stay pointed parallel to the line of travel NOT angled outward away from the line of travel, This ensures that the the skate can properly track along a carving an arc line as it rolls through the push. Eh, when skating you have to push rearward as the skate carves, more so twards the end of a stroke. Since you can only push off a skate laterally, the direction your foot must push against cannot stay perpendicular to your line of travel. If you only push perpendicular to your direction of travel, you will never be as fast as you can be.



-Armadillo
If youd like to simulate a crossover, step sideways up stairs, such as left shoulder facing up the stairway, right leg steps across the left leg and up the staircase. You litterally walk sideways up the stairs. Skating for crossovers is essentially the same. You are steping sideways and making a circle. You'll want to turn your chest to the direction you wish to go, this includes up the stairs. Your arms should swing , but not rotate (hook punches). Think of how a sprinter runs, and the way they blade their hands as they pump their arms. Your crossover should have a similar motion and stay in line with your torsos pitch. If you find your arms are crossing the center of your chest your hooking your arms. Bring them closer to your sides and it should help.

The real magic with pointing your chest the direction you wish to go is it realigns your hips when the ouside leg (crossover leg) lifts off the floot. The inside leg will pigeontoe slightly as the outside leg swings across (hopefully with the absolute minimal clearance needed) when the outside leg (crossover skate) is set down it should establish a new line, your toe will be pointing in a much different direction as the underpush leg just had. This greatly assists the crossover skill in performing a turn.

I generally find the center of my chest turned towards my left hip, around 45 of rotation or so on sharper turns.

The way to simulate a leaning condition is to start by leaning into a wall with your shoulder then positioning your skates with a lean as well. This will let you feel how your legs should be positioned. The under push legs toe should ve pointed slightly away from the wall and the toe of th crossing over leg should be pointing towards the wall. If done correctly, the skates will habe 2 different angles of attack and will hold you in place.

I recommend carpet first, since it takes a lot of the rolling element away, but you can still feel which way the skates would/could roll.

A crossover eventually becomes a move that must end up with the crossing leg literally "catching" your body. Which takes some confidence that comes with time. Since you must completely trust your skate to hold you in a leaned state as you step across with the other leg.
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Old September 6th, 2016, 12:38 AM   #19
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This is a lot of information. Thank you for taking the time to explain this. I'm having trouble understand the part about pushing your feet outward and not pushing back. I wish that I could see it in action so that I could follow what you are saying better.

The crossover circles sound like a good thing to add to my practice though. I will see how many I can do before my head is spinning, though I have not done crossovers at all yet. Thanks again for sharing your detailed experience with me. I get excited thinking about trying it the things I'm told will make me better.
VID→ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZP62...youtu.be&t=30s

Watch this hockey circle drill video from earlier in the thread & slow it down to .5 or .25 speed. At 43 seconds begin observing how the wheel alignment is CONTINUOUSLY BEING STEERED to follow the curving arc path of the circle, and the direction the down skate's wheels are pointing is "constantly carving " to keep the skate frame at a perfect RIGHT ANGLE to a radial line coming from the center of the circle (i.e. frame stays tangent to circle).

Most beginners barely CARVE AN ARC as they push against the down skate, and instead, they let their pushing skate follow along too much of a straight line that angles their foot/leg outward away from the center of the circle. The more the down and pushing skate, foot & leg angles outward and away from the center of the circle, the less energy is produced by the push.

The purpose of the push is to move your body inward toward the center of the curving arc path that the skate is made to carve along.
So, it is counterproductive if you allow your wheels to just follow the too straight line path they prefer to roll.

Instead, you need to carve the skate so that it follows an inward curving arc, as your leg extension then pushes your body FURTHER INWARD toward the center of the arc/circle, being moved that way by the LATERAL direction that the leg's thrust force & its RADIALLY INWARD extension motion sends your body. You are literally throwing your body left and right with the push from each leg and you can only gain the most acceleration from this effort when the down skate is carving along an inward curving arc path.

Beginners think that because they DO KNOW (correctly) that when you start out from zero speed, you must point the skate more angled outward and direct the leg force more rearward, that this means you just have to keep doing this harder and faster as you gain speed. NO, NO, NO! Everything changes once you start to gain some rolling speed, and the down skate must be made to carve inward along a curve with each push, while the leg push direction must be altered from being directed at a rearward angle, to being directed 100% 90 lateral (left/right).

The video close-up segments illustrate this very well.

-Armadillo
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Old September 6th, 2016, 12:52 PM   #20
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VID→ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZP62...youtu.be&t=30s

Watch this hockey circle drill video from earlier in the thread & slow it down to .5 or .25 speed. At 43 seconds begin observing how the wheel alignment is CONTINUOUSLY BEING STEERED to follow the curving arc path of the circle, and the direction the down skate's wheels are pointing is "constantly carving " to keep the skate frame at a perfect RIGHT ANGLE to a radial line coming from the center of the circle (i.e. frame stays tangent to circle).

Most beginners barely CARVE AN ARC as they push against the down skate, and instead, they let their pushing skate follow along too much of a straight line that angles their foot/leg outward away from the center of the circle. The more the down and pushing skate, foot & leg angles outward and away from the center of the circle, the less energy is produced by the push.

The purpose of the push is to move your body inward toward the center of the curving arc path that the skate is made to carve along.
So, it is counterproductive if you allow your wheels to just follow the too straight line path they prefer to roll.

Instead, you need to carve the skate so that it follows an inward curving arc, as your leg extension then pushes your body FURTHER INWARD toward the center of the arc/circle, being moved that way by the LATERAL direction that the leg's thrust force & its RADIALLY INWARD extension motion sends your body. You are literally throwing your body left and right with the push from each leg and you can only gain the most acceleration from this effort when the down skate is carving along an inward curving arc path.

Beginners think that because they DO KNOW (correctly) that when you start out from zero speed, you must point the skate more angled outward and direct the leg force more rearward, that this means you just have to keep doing this harder and faster as you gain speed. NO, NO, NO! Everything changes once you start to gain some rolling speed, and the down skate must be made to carve inward along a curve with each push, while the leg push direction must be altered from being directed at a rearward angle, to being directed 100% 90 lateral (left/right).

The video close-up segments illustrate this very well.

-Armadillo
This makes more sense now. At least with turns it makes sense to me. I imagine this is applicable in non turning situations as well? When I watch Bill Stoppard I see him doing crossovers constantly. Is this so that he has more room to push his down skate laterally instead of back? Should I be doing some sort of crossover at all times or is it mostly a tool for turns?

I did start practicing my crossovers yesterday for the first time. It's pretty frightening at first but my legs quickly found the feeling. Speed and tighter arc are still a ways off though.
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