S k a t e L o g     F o r u m
Inline Skating and Quad Roller Skating
Forum Hosts: Jessica Wright | Kathie Fry

FOLLOW US: Our Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Email    


Home - Forum Index - Africa Skating - Asia Skating - Europe Skating - Oceania Skating - Pan America Skating - Roller_Rinks - Friend the SkateLog Forum in Facebook - SkateLog Forum on Facebook

Forum Administrators: Jessica Wright and Kathie Fry | Email Us
Access code for buying and selling subforums: "skates"
How To Get a User Account and Posting Privileges in the SkateLog Forum
Use Google to Search the SkateLog Forum

Go Back   SkateLog Forum > Special Interest Skating Forums (sorted by number of posts) > Speed Skating Forum
FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Speed Skating Forum Most of the discussions in this forum will be about inline speed skating but discussions about ice speed skating and quad roller speed skating are also welcome.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old December 11th, 2006, 09:04 PM   #1
mjcole
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Toronto ON
Posts: 53
Default heat molding RB Problades

Hi everyone,

Recently I bought a pair of Rollerblade Problades, these are RBs racing skate, low cuff, all carbon boot 4x100mm frame, etc. (Yes I would have liked to have bought the Bont Vaypor customs, but hey it's a first racing skate for me, and it was on sale at Inlinewarehouse.)

Anyway I am curious, has anyone tried heat molding on Rollerblade? It should be possible, after all you can heat mold a K2 or a Bont why would Rollerblade be any different? Does anyone have any comment or suggestions for someone comming from a K2 Radical 100 to the Problades, or, more generally, racing skates? What can I do to reduce the damage the skate does to my ankle? (It keeps digging right in at the top of the cuff, so far, thanks to the weather it hasn't really mattered much, haven't gone anywhere, but in the summer I might be grounded, judging by the way my ankle is bleeding now.)

Thanks

Michael
mjcole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 12th, 2006, 03:01 AM   #2
BWI-Sheldon
Pro Bike Chaser
 
BWI-Sheldon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Maryland
Posts: 3,378
Default

Yes they are heat moldable. I skate with someone that has them and did it.

Shedlon
BWI-Sheldon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 12th, 2006, 11:41 AM   #3
Pepper Montana
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 986
Default

Hi Michael,
They are moldable to a very limited extent. Nothing like the skates I have now which actually seem to move when heated. I needed to use extensive amounts of heat and force to make the smallest incremental changes in the fit of the Problades. For as long as I wore those skates I needed to wear the Ezeefit booties because they just didn't fit quite right. Couldn't get it good in those boots and I was doing a minimum of 50 miles a week in them last summer. I ended up exchanging the RBs for K2 pro longmounts when the Rollerblade frame cracked in July. I also bought from Inline Warehouse, btw. Keep that thought in mind if/when your frames crack. IW now has the Powerslide line and lots of people on this board are happy with them.

For a person who is just getting into speedskating I think that the best thing to do is determine your goals. If you want to go fast you should find training partners or a team to help you learn skating techniques because it makes learning how to go fast much easier.

Good luck and keep us posted!

Last edited by Pepper Montana; December 13th, 2006 at 06:32 AM. Reason: clarity!
Pepper Montana is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 20th, 2006, 05:04 PM   #4
j_nolesfan
Training to catch up.
 
j_nolesfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Pensacola, FL, USA, Earth
Posts: 1,266
Default

I'm not familiar with Rollerblade boots but I think you should be able to do it. Get a heat gun. Be patient. Heat your hot spot gradually. The goal is to allow the heat to conduct through the outer covering and deep into the shell. You can't do this quickly or you'll fry the leather/lorino/vinyl covering. It can take 15 or 20 minutes to get a spot properly warmed if you're doing it correctly. Keep the gun moving. I like to blow it against my skin occasionally while heating to judge the amount of heat I'm hitting at the current distance between the gun and the boot. I usually do this with the boot on my foot. If I want to expand an area, I usually add an extra layer inside the boot between my foot and that area. I use a piece of leather cut from a work glove. This, in addition to the sock on my foot, will add pressure to the point I want to expand. You'll feel the heat inside the boot when it starts to get warm enough. Be cautious, you don't want to burn your foot. My ankle was the latest adjustment. If the cuff's what is hurting your leg/ankle, you'd think you could warm up the cuff area and use your hands to bend the top edge of the cuff away from your leg. Another option would be to heat up the cuff while wearing the boot and while the boot is warm, pivot your foot in the manner that causes the problem. Just go slow and make gradual adjustments.
Good luck,
Jeff
j_nolesfan is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 12:17 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.