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Slalom Cone Skating Forum Discussions about slalom cone skating, high-jump, and other freestyle trick skating. (Note that vert, street, and park skating discussions should be posted in our aggressive skating forum.)

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Old September 27th, 2010, 10:52 PM   #1
AwkwardTurtle
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Location: O'ahu, Hawaii
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Arrow Flat and Banana Rocker Set up

I have been using flat set up for my hockey skates for some time I think. I can't tell if the wheels are exactly flat set up because it feels like some of them may have been run down. So, they are sort of like a banana rocker set up now I guess, since my friend and I switched wheels around.

I believe I know most about the flat set up, since it has the best stability among the rest of the wheel set ups but I don't know much about the banana rocker set up. I have been trying to search for pictures of rockered wheels but I haven't been able to find them. Even using Google images, I've found it very difficult to find a single picture of it. I know there are 2 smaller wheels on the outside with 2 larger in the inside, but I can't scale it in my mind because I don't know the sizes.

Basically, I would like to know the pros/cons of flat set up and banana rocker set up from you guys. As in, the best places for them and if they can help or render your abilities.

I do know rocker set up is better for slalom, or at least most recommended. But for Hawaii there are many hills here and there it's safer to go with the flat set up. I can always just buy a separate set of 76mm or 80mm (4) to test both out. But with some background information available, it would be a lot easier not only for me, but for those with the same question. (I think I sound like I'm demanding for answers.. but I am sort of desperate since the resources to this kind of information is limited to only forums that I can understand aka English.).

Thanks

Edit: I've browsed around yesterday and found this article on wheel set up. But sadly, they only have drawings of them it. fml...

http://skating.thierstein.net/Knowle...Rockering.html
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Old September 28th, 2010, 12:14 AM   #2
stacy
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You aren't going to find many photos of a rockered wheel setup because it is a pretty small visual difference, and would be very difficult to get a photo that conveyed what was going on.

I'm only going to address the situation with a "flat" frame. If you are on hockey skates, you may have a hi-lo frame which would be a different situation.

The most common way to rocker is to put wheels that are 4mm smaller than the largest wheel size in the front and back, and to put the largest wheel size in the middle. So on a 243 mm frame you would have 76-80-80-76, and on a 231 frame you would have 72-76-76-72. In shorthand those would be 76/80 or 72/76 rockers. The effect of this is that your wheels now make an arc (or banana) shape, instead of a straight line, and when you skate you will only ever have 2 wheels on the ground at one time-- front 2, middle 2, or back 2. This makes you much more maneuverable, which is why it is preferred for slalom and other kinds of freestyle and artistic skating. It does also, as you mentioned make you less stable, and in particular more prone to the dreaded "speed wobble" if you are going too fast. Better skaters tend to be better at counteracting this, but if you are uncertain on your skates, it is best to be cautious.
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